Paint Basket Art Forum

Oil Painting => Oil Painting General Chat => Topic started by: Maryna on September 21, 2017, 06:02:13 PM

Title: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Maryna on September 21, 2017, 06:02:13 PM
Is there a special brush that one can use to sign oil paintings?
I thin down my paint and use a rigger but still it looks fat and sloppy. I want to sign in a professional manner very thinly.
Any suggestions?
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: EmmaLee on September 21, 2017, 07:50:26 PM
I have a hard time signing a nice signature with a rigger brush. I always push too hard and make fatter strokes. To sign my paintings I use a spotter brush. It's super tiny and it takes many dips in the paint to complete the signature but I feel like I have more control.
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: MaryAnne Long on September 22, 2017, 04:49:42 AM
I feel your pain, Maryna.  I think signing the painting is harder than painting it.

I want to sign mine in black or white pen (depending on the background) but someone said that made the painting a mixed media.  I don't believe that since the signature is not really a part of the composition.

Nolan?  Dennis?  What is your take on this?

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Annie. on September 22, 2017, 07:43:32 AM
Maryna,
I use a very thin rigger brush (long hair) and I thin the paint with lots of oil.  I remove the extra on the palette and when I am happy with the stroke I sign the painting lightly.  I need 1 or 2 loadings of paint for my short name.  It took a bit of practice at first but now I feel confident.

Saying that I don't do well with acrylics, and I had used an acrylic 'pen' to sign.

P.S.  Dennis signs his WC with a pen.  Surely that doesn't make it a mixed media.  I sign my WC with WC, the same way I do with oil.
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Maryna on September 22, 2017, 08:57:38 AM
I do battle with my thin rigger. I will give the spotter brush a go.


Mea, don't sign with pen or so. I remember Dennis or Nolan talking about it once.


I also read on Wetcanvas people say a sharpie fades with time.


I think signing with a pen or so on an oil makes it seem less authentic and seems as uf the artist did not bother with the finak and very valuable touch.
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: MaryAnne Long on September 22, 2017, 04:00:38 PM
Thanks, Maryna.  That makes sense.  Yes, now I remember the Nolan talking about this.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Sacgal/Sharon on September 22, 2017, 04:54:00 PM
This is a good chat to have read - I'll have to practice signing some of my oils now!
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: liz on September 23, 2017, 05:52:54 AM
MaryAnne, what did Nolan say?  I have a hard time signing with a rigger brush also.  What about a calligraphy pen on paper? ~Liz
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: MaryAnne Long on September 23, 2017, 06:51:45 AM
Liz,
I cannot find the SEARCH function that we had on the old website, so I cannot find out what Nolan said and I don't remember anything except that it should be distinctive, consistent, and be placed where it will not be covered by  frame.

I bought a Sharpie designed for archival work like signing paintings.  Darn - it's for watercolor.  I am sure I read that they make an oil one, too.  I am going to look next time I am at Fisher.

Luckily I don't need the painting signed until we set up the miniature show on Nov. 4.

Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: dennis on September 23, 2017, 08:01:54 AM
I have been watching this post with interest  ;)
I sign all my watercolour paintings with either a pencil or a black waterproof pen.
My pen and ink drawings with the waterproof pen.
My oil and acrylic paintings with a #2 rigger brush. Don't sign your oil paintings with a pen :heeha: You can sign acrylics with a waterproof pen.
NEVER sign your paintings with an ordinary ballpoint pen, or any other type of pen for that matter, as most of them fade over time.

Just check that your black waterproof pen states that it is pigment and fade proof.
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Maryna on September 23, 2017, 10:23:17 AM
Thank you Dennis.
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: MaryAnne Long on September 23, 2017, 04:36:40 PM
Thanks, Dennis.

I am going to do so serious practice to try to learn to sign the oils with a rigger brush.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: dennis on September 23, 2017, 05:52:42 PM
When you use the rigger brush, do it lightly and with the tip only. The paint must flow like ink.
BTW, signing,  by any means,  has nothing to do with mixed media  O0
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: liz on September 24, 2017, 01:29:25 AM
 :thankyou: DENNIS, for the info on what to sign paintings with.  I signed a bunch of mini acrylic paintings with a waterproof pen. ~Liz
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Annie. on September 24, 2017, 01:28:43 PM
 :thankyou: Dennis.  Now it is very clear.
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: MaryAnne Long on September 24, 2017, 08:35:34 PM
Did some serious practice today on signing on an old discarded canvas.

I ended up getting the best results with a small 0 brush.  I just cannot control the rigger brush.


Obviously, some are better than others.  The best ones were when I broke the round letters into arcs and did each part separately.  I made the paint really inky and redipped the brush constantly.

Thank, Dennis, I feel that I am making progress.  Will practice more again.  It's hard on my eyes for more than 30 minutes at a time.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: liz on September 25, 2017, 12:43:47 AM
 ::)   This signing business can sure be tricky!


Two questions: 
   1)  Do you think the length of the brush bristles/hairs makes a difference in the flow of the paint, in signing not in tree twigs or such;
   2)  What do you think about outlining lightly with a wax or watercolor pencil, then go over it with the paint?  Your letters should be uniform size then.


Actually, another question for Dennis:
   Is it O.K. To sign only first name?  It is hard enough with just first name.  I am trying that now with a flourish.  Just 3 letters. Thanks.~ Liz
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Val on September 26, 2017, 04:26:06 PM
I think it's a matter of preference Liz. Of course you could become confused with other artists if you have a fairly common name. In which case you would need to make it instantly recognizable as yours, as Nolan has done. His is very distinct. O0
Title: Re: Signing oil paintings
Post by: Annie. on September 27, 2017, 01:39:57 AM
I think Liz is great.  Nice and easy to remember, not to mentionned made famous by the movie The Parent Trap  ? .  Just make those 3 letters look special and unique.

My name is common but I have never seen a signature similar to mine.