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Oil Painting => Oil Painting General Chat => Topic started by: Kelley on November 05, 2010, 05:52:23 AM

Title: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 05, 2010, 05:52:23 AM
I found a couple of pictures I liked that a friend took in fall (leaves have many colors) and winter (snow covered trees) of the same location in Boise, Idaho.  I want to change the scene a bit by gently curving the ravine and adding the same type of trees to both banks, a coloured bridge or adding a hill to counter balance.  I'll start with making a few notans of what is appealing first then work on color.  This will be the first thought out painting I've done yet  :P(without a brush in my hand).  :sweat: The first step is usually the hardest.

I've attached the pics of what I'm working with.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 05, 2010, 10:10:59 AM
wow, the fall colours are absolutely amazing Kelley, it sure would make a great painting that.
The snow one will also look good if you add a deer or something as a spot of colour for a focal point.

Looking forward to seeing the notans :clap:
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 05, 2010, 03:02:19 PM
I was considering a coloured bridge (blue or red perhaps), but I very much like the deer idea instead. Thank you!
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 05, 2010, 07:35:05 PM
To add a bridge I suspect you would have to narrow the river otherwise the bridge would end up too big, but a bridge could look good. Even one of those old stone bridges.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 05, 2010, 11:36:51 PM
Yes, I was considering narrowing the water path and creating a bridge somewhere before the vanishing point, but a deer or even two would be more interesting and give a better mood of quietness and tranquility.  I remember you saying something to the effect that our mood affects how we paint.  I find that to be very true.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 06, 2010, 03:34:26 AM
it sure does. It can change our mood too, that is why art classes are often "prescribed" to folks recovering from depression and anxiety. You can only feel better after painting a nice bright painting. O0
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 06, 2010, 07:15:15 PM
I'm apparently better with color than black and white :whistle:.   Well, here are some notans to start. :-\
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 06, 2010, 07:58:58 PM
here is my notan for the colour scene so you can compare


it has an interesting shape, but maybe a bit on the dark side so you could add some more light for balance. See how you can bring some more light in. I want you to come up with a suggestion or two before I post mine - I don't want to influence you creative decisions by making my own suggestions now.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 06, 2010, 10:24:51 PM
Well, I opened the clearing a bit and lowered some of the trees to view the sky.  Then I fell asleep thinking about what else to do  :whistle:  The trouble I am having is that I see  in colour and the water (although I see now as dark) seemed lighter instead of solid black.  Yours is a wider, broader stroke.  I'll have to develop more abstract than details for the big picture.

Second notan here is with less of a bank on the left.  Third is with more water on right with lighter opening/clearing on the right as well.  Fourth and final is with various openings in trees causing "windows" for light to come through.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 09, 2010, 10:39:56 AM
great job on the sleep notans Kelley  ;D

without a doubt my favourite is "fall windows" it has excellent balance and an interesting shape.
"small left bank" seems heavy on the right - now you can see what we mean by the objects having weight O0
"open clearing" is also nice and will also make a good painting
"more water on right" - the more water tends to draw your eye towards that clearing and out of the picture so that one doesn't work for me.

I am sure you have learnt a lot doing these notans, and saved yourself a lot of headaches in the future because a notan only takes a minute to do and it quickly gives you a feel for what the end result will look and feel like. High five from me for doing them  :twothumbs:
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 09, 2010, 03:20:52 PM
I was going nuts :uglystupid2: for a while trying to figure out how to make variations.  I'll give fall windows a try on canvas next.  Thanks for you assessment and encouragement.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 09, 2010, 08:43:00 PM
:clap:
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Val on November 09, 2010, 10:50:34 PM
Apologies for dropping in but I find this is a fascinating process.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 09, 2010, 11:17:00 PM
You are not intruding and very welcome to join in any time, my friend.  I think you and I can learn from our instructors and each other.  I've never done this before so hopefully this new process will help us both.  I imagine making a notan can help you come up with interesting backgrounds for your water colour as well.  Glad to have you Val  O0
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Val on November 10, 2010, 09:17:33 AM
 :flowers:
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on November 11, 2010, 03:19:57 AM
I was walking hand in hand with my beloved on Sunday and she showed me something extremely obvious.  She pointed out shadows of trees and how the shadows of branches break to allow some light to hit the ground around and through them.  I still marvel at how I could miss something so simple (and yet complex to paint). In case I'm not the only one that misses the obvious :squareeyes: I thought I'd share this.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on November 11, 2010, 03:53:05 AM
thanks Kelley, yes it amazing how often we just presume instead of actually looking  :detective:
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Val on November 11, 2010, 10:34:52 AM
Yes, I too plead guilty to the fact! That's one of the reasons I like to carry my camera everywhere I go. Its amazing the little things one misses while actually being there and seeing it...then looking at the picture afterwards and noting...I don't remember seeing that! Its sometimes these little oversights that make our pictures complete.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: dennis on November 11, 2010, 06:58:13 PM
That oversight is called "Knowing what to leave out and what to put in" -  more on what to leave out than putting in because we tend to put in too much detail - comes from copying a photograph too accurately ::)
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on December 15, 2010, 04:45:55 AM
 :'( sigh... I finally reached the end of the lesson.  I am so, so grateful for the course and feel  :smart:  I now know how to produce an idea, how to come up with a plan and how to transfer that thought process to canvas with either pencil, acrylic or oil.  It didn't really occur to me that I had a choice, but Nolan is right - I don't have to stick to one medium.  I am also starting on a couple of other ideas that I have started notans for (Nolan has walked me through the first).  What a superb journey this has been.

I am so encouraged by other artists here and am growing in confidence.  I said it before but was insecure and withdrew my offer to sell.  After considering the reason for selling and what price to put on the painting I am confident and ready to sell.  I will be giving the proceeds of my next [few] paintings to help victims of the Haiti earthquake.  I have some friends that have gone to provide shelter, comfort, and time with Haitians. Since I am not able to go I figure this is at least one thing I can do.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Val on December 15, 2010, 08:06:14 AM
 :clap:  :congrats: Bravo Kelley, its a big step. Well done. Do hope that you will keep in touch via the forum, I'm sure there are still lots of concepts to be shared and discovered.  All the best
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: nolan on December 15, 2010, 11:16:39 AM
That's great stuff Kelley :clap:

Now it's to learn as many techniques as you can O0
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on December 15, 2010, 03:31:28 PM
Val - there is no way I am leaving this site!  I love this place.  I have too  much to learn here.  Thank you so much for your encouragement and fellowship.

Nolan - I definitely agree.  I have so much to learn in the way of technique, style, use of medium.  I started the painting that you helped me do a notan for, but it looks different on canvas.  Not to become a UFO - I will stick with it, but am going to work on another seascape since so many locals here want to see me do it again. 

I purchased a flesh-tone paint because I am interested in painting people.. well, not literally. :whistle:  I have a few photography friends that I may be able to borrow some black and white shots from.  I may actually try drawing first, but I'll need much coaching.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: dennis on December 15, 2010, 07:26:25 PM
 Hi Kelley.
Noticed you bought some flesh tint. You will find that it still cannot be used straight from the tube as such. I normally mix my flesh colours from Cad Red and Cad Yellow and still have to add a very small touch of other colours to get the right colour and  shade (tone) for the portrait in particular.

Another nice colour to use for skin (specially for someone who has a slight tan) in Burnt Sienna. Obviously there are many different mixes for skin colours - each one depending on the race, the nationality, etc. As I said before - art is just one huge experiment - one never stops experimenting to get things and colours as you want them. This is what makes art so interesting and challenging :help: If you really want to learn, try and keep out of your comfort zone :heeha:

Here are a couple of portraits I have done. One was still in progress.
It is clear here that there are so many different colour mixes for skin tones.  :confused:
(http://i771.photobucket.com/albums/xx360/artyman/DSCF3253_400.jpg)

(http://i771.photobucket.com/albums/xx360/artyman/DSCF8656_adj400.jpg)

(http://i771.photobucket.com/albums/xx360/artyman/ChiefIsraelNgobeni.jpg)
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Val on December 15, 2010, 09:08:17 PM
 :oops: I'm so used to w/c I put my newest in the wrong spot! I forgot to mention that it is acrylic on w/c paper (all I have at the moment). Seems to work ok.  Will leave it at that for now.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Kelley on December 16, 2010, 05:37:45 AM
Dennis, such wonderful tips and examples!  I thank you, sir.  I wasn't too sure which colours to mix to get just the right tones.  This will truly be out of my comfort zone so I have nothing but growth during this exercise.  Let's see if I can't get a volunteer to hold still long enough. :2funny:.  Perhaps I'll start with a self portrait.  I am just going through some brainstorming ideas. 

I like the background on the first painting you posted.  The colours on the second are much bolder, younger perhaps.  I especially like the regal looking gentleman in tribal attire.  I have no idea how you achieved his skin tones, but I am going to try it.  I am very fond of your and Nolan's work. O0

Nolan says there are other 'better' artists.  That may or may not be true, but none that I know of that can teach me and encourage the way you do.
Title: Re: Cropping the scene for my next painting
Post by: Val on December 16, 2010, 09:40:08 AM
WOW... haven't tried 'real' people as yet, have always wanted to do portraits but must be able to draw one first! That will be a growing journey a bit further down the road. Lots to conquer before I get there.
Beautiful portraits.
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