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Oil Painting => Oil Painting General Chat => Topic started by: nolan on February 01, 2010, 06:04:37 AM

Title: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on February 01, 2010, 06:04:37 AM
In this part of the forum you can chat about or ask questions about anything to do with oil painting.

If you have done or are busy with an oil painting and want our comments on it, then please post it in the Encourager Section (http://http://www.paintbasket.com/members/viewforum.php?f=9)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: patindaytona on December 27, 2010, 04:39:12 PM
I thought I had it all down. I studied the color wheel, everything. Today, almost emmediately as soon as things started going wrong I get so impulsive. I had some greens mixed for distant shrubbery,etc.
To make it short, I started grabbing anything on my pallete. It's a landscape. I am pretty good with tones and can judge them well on the painting, but that's mostly what i'm looking at. In other words, the colors are not accurate (not the same greens in the photo, but at least they ARE green). You've seen painters who work real fast and just dip into all kinds of paints. I'm a little that way, because I see things "IN"the painting (invision) and that makes me impulsive. I begin using my finger, using a dry towel to "wipe out"..because i'm invisioning things from what I've already got layed down. It turned out fairly well eventually, but not done with it yet. It's just that when i had something good and it messes up, i panic and have no idea what to do! I wipe out what i think is wrong, and then it's a big smear, then i really panic and start dipping any paint pile that's there, some greyish blue, some pure green, some pure burnt sienna and start mixing on the canvas. I guess their's no real answer here. Anxiety causes impulsiveness. It's not a good thing.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: patindaytona on December 27, 2010, 05:37:22 PM
The sky went ok, but the foreground no. I'm just hoping it was a difficult subject to begin with. Their's little contrast. It's not like "a tree goes here, a rock goes there". All it has is subtle variation. So I quickly got carried away and added thick paint with a knife, and made it all much more contrasty. I ended up sloppily mixing my shadow color with some green here and burnt sienna there, quite carelessly. But the thing is......all those colors are kind of compatible with each other. Was I making mud, or was i actually doing something that was not wrong? No matter what the ratios were, would it end up right because the core color would always be something that belongs in a landscape? Hoping it was just this painting alone that was a difficult one.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on December 27, 2010, 06:10:09 PM
 ;D sometimes the odd mixes do work, but you will always get better results if you mix your colours according to a system. That way you have a lot more control over the resultant colour.

Having said that, it isn't always necessary to mix the colours exact, you often want to enhance / change the colours to get certain effects or change the lighting in the scene
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: patindaytona on December 27, 2010, 07:27:05 PM
Usually when I tell myself it's done (painting every nuance I can possibly see!), i let it dry, then get it out a couple days later and then start to modify. Using glazes. That usually seems to be the way i do all my paintings. Toning down colors, enhancing, cleaning up edges,etc.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: patindaytona on December 27, 2010, 07:47:39 PM
Another way to look at it is that painting is an interpretation. It can border on the abstract. Off colors,etc. BUT....if it is tastefully worked out, it's ok. Still...i prefer to try and do those colors more correct.
Title: Portrait
Post by: Kelley on February 26, 2011, 03:49:31 AM
I have only done one portrait in acrylic and then it was very long time ago.  I may start one in oil as I mentioned to Dennis, but I need to complete the painting of the jetty fishing.  Would it be more difficult doing a self portrait in a mirror or a painting from a picture?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: DebRamthun on February 26, 2011, 06:09:47 PM
I have  a question concerning varnish... I am nearing completion of a painting I want to show.  I have no idea how to varnish when the painting is still fresh.  I have never varnished before liking the muted tones but this one needs to look fresh.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
I can be found on facebook under
_deb_ramthun_  (with the slashes removed)
the painting is posted there and shows the progression from start to within a few weeks of done.
Thanks again
Deb
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Kelley on February 27, 2011, 01:38:33 AM
I have yet to varnish a painting Deb.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: dennis on February 27, 2011, 02:13:31 AM
Hi Deb
First I need to know what the medium is you paint in - oils or acrylics.
In acrylics you can varnish the painting as it is thoroughly dry - say an hour or 2 after completion if you have not been using an extender gel.

Oil paintings, even if thinly painted, need to be left for about 4 months before applying a varnish. If impasto style then can be anything from 10 - 12 months depending on the thickness applied.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on February 27, 2011, 12:04:16 PM
Dennis... is varnishing an acrylic painting a necessity or just good practice? Curious  :confused:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: DebRamthun on February 27, 2011, 12:48:31 PM
It is an Oil painting.... I had not varnished yet just because usually when a painting was done.... well it was done and varnish was just an afterthought.  But I was in the art store (insert any art store name in your area)  and there was a varnish for use when the paint is still relatively fresh.  I don't remember the exact name of it but it could be applied early and then reworked over.  the suggested use was for when you wanted a painting varnished for a show.
I am not sure how to insert photos here so this is the facebook link to the painting.
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=174176722628266&set=a.162289600483645.31199.109053815807224&theater (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=174176722628266&set=a.162289600483645.31199.109053815807224&theater)

If you click further you can see it in progression....
I want to really have the brush stroke in the background not dull out.
Thank you so much.  Any advice about varnish is appreciated.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: dennis on February 27, 2011, 07:06:29 PM
Quote
and there was a varnish for use when the paint is still relatively fresh.

I must admit that I have not heard of this before. As they say, "One is never too old to learn!"
Will have to research this one. Many places will not let a painting be entered for an exhibition when it is still wet - the  damage factor, insurance, etc.

Varnishing is not a necessity but it does give a additional protection layer and also enhanced the colour.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: DebRamthun on February 27, 2011, 11:22:09 PM
The painting is within a week or two of done.  And will be hung in about two months. just wanted to keep that crisp apple color and shine. 
thanks for the thoughts and ideas.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Kelley on February 28, 2011, 12:25:24 AM
Deb, I followed the progression of the painting and was quite impressed with how you documented everything. Wonderful work with Abe. :clap:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: dennis on February 28, 2011, 05:07:00 AM
An interesting piece of information I googled from a manufacturer.

Quote
Also, contrary to what some believe, applying a drying medium over a wet oil painting will not cause the paint film to dry faster; rather it seals in the paint, preventing proper oxidation, which can lead to cracking.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on March 09, 2011, 07:19:03 PM
Kelley, it would be more difficult doing a portrait from a mirror.

Deb - I only varnish acrylic paintings
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on July 30, 2011, 12:15:49 AM
You can frame a wet painting I have done it many times, you just have to be VERY careful to not smudge the painting when putting it into the frame  ;)

I suppose you could varnish a painting while it is in the frame by carefully masking the frame with masking tape, but that would be kinda lazy, it's too easy to quickly remove the painting from the frame  ::)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: liz on July 30, 2011, 02:04:04 AM
Hi Deb,
Could it be that you're thinking of a light varnish that can be used when your painting surface is dry? It is not a heavy permanent coat of varnish, but maybe 'Retouching varnish,' which is applied to even out shine and protect oil pigment until such time that you can apply varnish, whenever that may be.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: dennis on July 30, 2011, 07:02:21 PM
I regularly varnish paintings when in the frame. I have developed a technique with the brush that does not damage the frame at all. I would recommend that if you are not experienced enough -  take the painting out of the frame first.

Don't use retouching varnish to do the final varnish on the painting. Retouching varnish is a special solution to actually react with the dry surface in order to form a bond with the new layer of paint. Oil paint gets hard and develops a very shiny surface as it ages and if you have to do work on an old painting without preparing the surface to be painted then there is the possibility that the paint will also peel of at some stage - like painting on glass.

If you use retouching varnish as a final varnish then you stand the chance that you can damage the painting. PLEASE remember that retouching an old painting is a specialized job.

You can see one of my restoration jobs here: http://www.paintbasket.co.za/restoration.htm (http://www.paintbasket.co.za/restoration.htm)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on August 02, 2011, 12:17:47 PM
Very wise.... listen to the headmaster  :smart:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: liz on August 03, 2011, 01:56:09 AM
Thanks, Dennis, for clarifying the use of retouching varnish which is used while yet working on a painting, but not for use as a final or permanent varnish.

Most of my paintings have never been varnished and the colors are still brilliant as some of you have seen.  When looking at them closely, however, a coat of varnish would 'brighten' them up.  Should I use spray or liquid varnish?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: dennis on August 03, 2011, 10:58:28 AM
I think that is a matter of personal choice. I have never used the spray so I can't really comment on it. I use the liquid varnish - our own mix.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Kelley on August 13, 2011, 06:48:36 PM
Wow, it sure does feel great to be back!  I feel as if I need to start over from fundamentals.  I have some ideas for painting subjects, but some require preparing the canvas to a very smooth surface.  This is something I've never achieved.  I am wondering how many layers of gesso this would require 5, 7, 10?  What do I use to sand between layers?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on August 13, 2011, 07:56:32 PM
Sandpaper?  :D Welcome back Kelley, nice to have you aboard.  :clap:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Kelley on August 13, 2011, 08:04:28 PM
Thanks Val!  I'll check our local art supply to see if they have such sandpaper.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on August 13, 2011, 11:32:23 PM
use #1000 sandpaper. Just be careful to not sand into the weave
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Kelley on August 13, 2011, 11:34:27 PM
Perfect! Thank you Nolan! O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Anya on September 24, 2011, 08:39:16 PM
What is the best way to patch up a tear in a canvas?

I was just cutting out the clear cover from the rose and sliced through the canvas. I just applied gesso to the back but not sure that will work.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on September 24, 2011, 09:40:21 PM
oops, so you didn't lay the canvas flat on the table and pack books underneath like I showed in the tulip tutorial :knuppel2:

You would normally glue a canvas patch at the back and then touch up the front with gesso.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Anya on September 24, 2011, 10:05:53 PM
Thanks Nolan, I haven't gotten around to watching the entire tulip video. Okay , now I know for next time. I have to tell you that this is such a fantastic idea to use clear cover, it was so quick and easy (except for the tear). It is such a pain to paint around all the edges when doing the background.

I am very excited to get started on  this rose.

Thanks for great teaching!!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on September 24, 2011, 11:53:25 PM
 O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: artluck on November 03, 2011, 02:54:58 PM
O0

I am learning so much here, thanks to you, Dennis, and other fellow artists.  After watching some of the vids, I realized that there was much learning on the sound basis for oil painting as there was on unlearning my old habits, despite my long lay off.  Needless to say, I am still struggling to integrate theory with practice as many of us may be doing.  May I propose something that I hope others will find useful --- and this is based on your very good response to my question on the color brown --- that we have a thread for some mini-quiz?  Specifically using the theoretical framework for color mixing we have so far learned.  For instance, if one has brown as a base color for instance, the highlight would then be the next color up the color wheel.  But as brown is the shadow color of orange (i.e. red, yellow + blue).  Then, is it safe to assume that the highlight for brown would be adding orange?  Would the shadow then be obtained by adding more blue?

The proposed model for the minI-quiz or whatever the administrators may decide:  if base color for an object of one's painting is color X, what would be a) the highlight color mix for this color? and b) what would constitute the color mix for shadow for the color X?  I have in mind here a complex mix of colors as a base color (as for the brown example) where the conventional color wheel may not provide ready answers, much less for newbies like myself.  It may be for selfish reasons that I propose such a thread, but I hope others may find it useful.  What do you, Dennis and others in my situation think?  Thanks all for your patience.  Hoping that this is not a tall order!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: thegrindre on November 03, 2011, 04:50:50 PM
Would it help any if you saw a 24 color wheel?
The shadow color for brown would be a bluish.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on November 03, 2011, 06:38:04 PM
the whole forum is a mini quizz  ;D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on November 03, 2011, 07:50:05 PM
Its like being a contestant on the $500,000 pyramid!  :2funny: That was an old gameshow from the U.S.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: artluck on November 03, 2011, 08:24:21 PM
Its like being a contestant on the $500,000 pyramid!  :2funny: That was an old gameshow from the U.S.

Sorry, but my post may have been wrongly worded, phrased, etc.  Regardless, I will throw in my questions when I run into a specific problem as it arises.  Just trying to overcome beginner anxieties and frustrations, that's all.  With your responses, the enormity of the proposal quickly began to sink  :2funny:.  Thanks to all for the wake up call anyway!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: thegrindre on November 03, 2011, 08:54:19 PM
No reason to be sorry, most of the current posters on these forums are all beginners. Not many of us have any more then a few months under our belts at most.
There are a few who have many years experience but haven't used in a long time. It's basically why we're all here. We're all 'beginners' in one way or another.

Have fun!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on November 03, 2011, 09:50:51 PM
 ;D in other words, ask your questions you have anywhere on the forum, we'll all do our best to help O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: artluck on November 03, 2011, 10:22:35 PM
;D in other words, ask your questions you have anywhere on the forum, we'll all do our best to help O0

 :thankyou: Nolan.  Very reassuring.  Will do.  Can't wait for my laminating sheets to arrive so I can put my color buster to use.  That should be a start.  Thanks folks!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on November 04, 2011, 12:54:03 AM
I'll have to print a new one...couldn't get mine laminated and it got a little wet....gave me a good idea of what colours NOT to blend!  :2funny:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: NHC50 on February 09, 2012, 12:08:38 AM
Nolan I have a question for you. I am getting ready to do a tulip painintg. I want to do a molted background. So I thought I would try your trick using contact paper over the tulips. But the contact paper will not stay on. I am doing this in acrylics. since the contact paper does not work. do I go ahead and do all the background. Which will be greens, browns, etc. with tall weeds, grasses. then paint the tulips over it.  :-\ If not what do I do?
Hope this makes sense. Oh by the way the tulips are pink.  ;D
Nina
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on February 09, 2012, 02:07:25 AM
use masking tape to tape the edges like I did with my tulip if your contact paper won't stick - seems like the brand you bought wasn't very good then  :-\
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: NHC50 on February 09, 2012, 02:26:41 AM
ok will try that thanks.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on February 09, 2012, 10:08:33 AM
Nolan, just curious .... could masking fluid be used in the initial stages of oil?  ???  I have only tried it once with acrylics and it seemed to work ok.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Maryna on February 09, 2012, 10:14:34 AM
Val, I have use masking fluid with my oils, worked ok, but just be very careful when you remove the masking fluid and just don't put it on too thin :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on February 09, 2012, 06:57:48 PM
technically you could, but I wouldn't as I feel it would disappear under the height of the paint and you would forget where you put it
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on February 10, 2012, 01:57:41 AM
Nolan that is exactly what I was pondering... if the thickness of the oils would be an issue. That summed it up quite nicely. Thank-you.  O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Honeysuckle73 on March 20, 2012, 09:07:38 PM
  :help: Nolan, I just tried to purchase the Shiny Lesson and it took me to 2co and ask me to open an account. Is that a new way to purchase? Should I open an account?  ???  :-\
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Honeysuckle73 on March 20, 2012, 09:39:07 PM
  ::)  O0  Nolan I got it!!  :clap:  :clap:   I was hitting the wrong button somewhere.  Finally got it right and now have the shiny class.  I have so many classes saved up, I will probably not live long enough to do them all.  Feel I must do the drawing course first (Dr. should release me this week, had to have a 3rd surgery last week (minor) as it does not stay available for long as the replays do.    :thankyou: :thankyou:  :thankyou: and Dennis for all the great lessons.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on March 20, 2012, 09:48:48 PM
wonderful, you must be getting withdrawal symptoms already  :D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on March 21, 2012, 12:33:41 AM
Honeysuckle, I hope you get well soon so you can get back to painting.   :1hug:

Nolan, what is your take on 'retouching varnish'?

I think my grandson would like to have the portrait I painted of him for his birthday on May 9th.  Would it be too soon to varnish it?  I think I finished painting it around December 30th.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on March 22, 2012, 09:00:52 PM
I am not a fan of varnishing oil paintings and seldom do it myself, but the retouch varnish is supposed to still allow the painting to continue drying underneath without the painting cracking, but as I have not used it myself, I can't confirm this
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: NHC50 on March 23, 2012, 01:54:36 AM
Nolan question, why is it they you are not a fan of varnishing oil painintgs?
Nina
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: erika on March 23, 2012, 06:34:11 AM
Interesting thread, I have been using retouch varnish after oil paintings are dry to the touch and ready to be exhibited, or sold.. but not old enough for a formal varnish with Damar or similar.

It is especially useful when a painting has dull patches due to certain paints drying differently, especially the browns like umber, sienna.  Retouch varnish is then used to 'level' out the shine on the surface of the painting.  Retouch has a high level of oil in the mix, so it can not seal the painting as such and cause damage - it's merely a temporary fix for the shine.  Spray cans work best.

OK anyone make their own medium?  I sometimes use my medium as a replacement for retouch varnish, a light glaze over the top does the same thing..  My medium consists of gum turps, damar varnish and stand oil.  I suppose there are umpteen recipes for this.. what is yours?

Enough babble from me  :blush:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Maryna on March 23, 2012, 06:39:54 AM
For me this is like greek, never done any varnishing, glazing or anything, don't know what it is for and why to do it  :confused:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: erika on March 23, 2012, 07:02:50 AM
me again...  :coffee: I absolutely LOVE the 'lift' varnishing gives to acrylic paintings, bringing out the colour and just giving it that umph   :uglystupid2: lol and I've found that acrylic is actually very vulnerable without it.. it's just plastic after all, and can do with a little bit of protection

Oils on the other hand can stand the test of time without any help from varnish - although it does protect it from dust and fly poo  :2funny: or rather, makes it easier to clean  :detective:  .... I loooooooove oils, just wished they would dry like, yesterday!  :licklips: :twothumbs:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Maryna on March 23, 2012, 07:23:03 AM
fly poo  :2funny: guess here it would be more gecko poo  :2funny: so many here, almost looks as if we got a farm or breeding program  :2funny:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on March 23, 2012, 12:56:58 PM
Erika, you said,
Quote
It is especially useful when a painting has dull patches due to certain paints drying differently, especially the browns like umber, sienna.  Retouch varnish is then used to 'level' out the shine on the surface of the painting.  Retouch has a high level of oil in the mix, so it can not seal the painting as such and cause damage - it's merely a temporary fix for the shine.  Spray cans work best.

I wouldn't have thought of varnishing my painting if it didn't have a large area that is dull/matte.  The painting looks ok as long as it's not in bright light.

You say Retouch varnish is a 'temporary fix'.  Does that mean that the area will return to it's dull state eventually?

Nolan, why not varnish?  And would you refresh my memory as to why this area took on a dull finish? 
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on March 23, 2012, 07:12:53 PM
Great info, thanks Erika  :clap:

Lillian, I don't like to varnish my oil paintings because there isn't a varnish on the market that doesn't yellow over time. Once a varnish has yellowed, it is a difficult and expensive process to remove that varnish again to get back to the original vibrant oil.

I do however varnish my acrylic paintings as they come alive when varnished and look a lot more expensive. Oil has a natural semi gloss due to it's oil content so looks good without the varnish.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Leana on March 23, 2012, 08:59:02 PM
For dull patches on an oilpainting I use Windsor & Newton's Artists' Painting Medium... works like a dream.  I bought the Retouching Varnish...have not used it yet. I also varnish my acrylic paintings.  O0

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on March 24, 2012, 12:06:58 AM
Erika, if my painting eventually returns to the original state, I don't see the point in my putting the retouch varnish on it.  I finished painting it around the end of December.

Nolan must have a good reason for not varnishing oil paintings, hmmmmm.  Perhaps it's too soon yet anyway.

Leana,  :thankyou:

I just went to the W&N website and here's what it says:

"[i]"Oiling out" is recommended for dull areas of a completed oil painting, how is this done?

Oiling out is the application of an oil medium to a painting which has sunk (become dull), or lost its oil to the layer underneath. The most common causes for this are an over-absorbent, cheap ground or the use of too much solvent and insufficient or no medium. When the colour is dry, Artists’ Painting Medium should be sparingly rubbed into any sunken areas with a clean cloth." [/i]

I think that will be the route I take unless of course Nolan advises against it.   :)

I took another look at the painting and, well, I suppose it really doesn't look that bad.

Like you, Erika, I like shiny things too but for this, I would just like a uniform sheen on it.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: GailBrown on March 24, 2012, 12:29:57 AM
I mix my own medium as well.  It is 1/3 damar varnish, 1/3 odour free mineral spirits and 1/3 walnut oil.  It works well and not too shiny.  I have been using this for the last 3 years and I am happy with it even though it can be a little cloudy in the bottle (not noticeable on the canvas).   I bought the premade medium made with walnut oil because I thought it might be better but I got a shiny finish (by mistake).  I don't like it because if I am using a lot of medium for a background for instance it becomes excessively shiny compared to the rest of the painting.  I have gone back to my homemade stuff-tried and true.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on March 24, 2012, 12:36:30 AM
Thanks Gail.  I'll bookmark this for future reference. 

You use this medium while doing the painting though, right?

I'm wondering what to do with the dull areas on my dry painting.

I use M. Graham oils and medium when doing the painting and I really like using them as they don't have a strong smell that would cause me to have headaches.

I did prepare my canvas with a good quality gesso, so I don't know what caused the sinking.  I did not use any alkyd medium as a first coat.  I'm wondering if that could have caused the dull finish.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: GailBrown on March 24, 2012, 02:48:40 PM
Lillian-- I have paintings that have dried unevenly similar to yours.  I haven't varnished, but I do use a little mdium when I paint.  I think the unevenness has to the colour you are using, perhaps some of the pigments absorb more than others.  I have noticed it especially in dark areas.  Now that some of my work is over a year old, I would consider varnishing.  I probably would just pick the spray varnish as it covers pretty evenly and you can do it lightly.  I have seen some people ruin their work with uneven varnish brush application.  Together with not being a fan of shiny stuff, I have resisted varnishing to this point.  Hope this helps.  p.s. I also use M Graham paints for the same reason as you.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on March 24, 2012, 09:50:14 PM
 :thankyou: Gail,

Decisions, decisions!    :think:  Now I'm thinking I'll wait until December rolls around and give it a light spray with the varnish.

You're right, it's the dark area that went dull and it's a large area.

I did want to give it to my grandson for his birthday in May, now he'll have to wait for Christmas.  I guess it will teach him to be patient!   :2funny:

I'm hoping to paint his big brother as soon as he gets his police uniform.  I would never dreamed of tackling anything like this if it hadn't been for Nolan's great teaching in the portrait painting classes.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on March 25, 2012, 10:09:41 PM
You're doing brilliantly Lillian.  It's no wonder your family all want their portraits painted!
You can do me if you like  :goofy:    I can't keep a straight face in a photo either!  >:D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on March 25, 2012, 10:36:48 PM
Val, if you sail that  :boat: up the St. Lawrence and pose for me, I'll paint your picture for you and of course it would have a smile.  Maybe it would make as many waves as the Mona Lisa.   :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on April 29, 2012, 10:17:49 AM
The 'Moaning Val'   :whistle:    :2funny:   :2funny:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on April 29, 2012, 12:03:08 PM
 ;D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Rose M. on June 13, 2012, 04:07:24 PM
Hi everyone, I am painting a ballerina with oil and was wondering is there anyone who could tell me how to make the paint translucent.  Part of her dress is sheer and I need to make it look that way.  I am using French Ultramarine blue for the dress.

Also, what colors do you use to paint the flesh?

Thanks for your help.

Rose 
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on June 13, 2012, 09:12:54 PM
Use thin colour washes or glazes to get the sheer effect

There is no magic mix for skin tone unfortunately, you will need to match what you see  :-\
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Zilpa on December 15, 2012, 07:53:55 AM
Hi all, I have a question. I was doing really well today following Dennis with the bluegum oil painting, When I had an accident with the canvas falling of my easel. I caught the canvas but it looks like my little house and the tree bushes next to it are either on speed or running away. can I let it dry and just repaint over the top of the affected area or do I need to do the whole thing again.   :help:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on December 15, 2012, 07:52:12 PM
paint over it before it dries. You can even scrape off the smudged area first if needed (I am presuming your are painting in oils)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Zilpa on December 16, 2012, 07:56:41 AM
Yes I am painting in oils. It is my first try with oils so thanks Nolan I will do that and see how it all turns out.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on January 14, 2013, 09:50:51 PM
For me this is like greek, never done any varnishing, glazing or anything, don't know what it is for and why to do it  :confused:

It protects the painting from the elements.  An oils instructor I had never varnished his paintings.  They had a little fire and the paintings got smoke damaged.  He had to repaint the final layer of each one which took many hours each.  He said if he had varnished them just a cleaning would have been needed.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on January 14, 2013, 09:52:40 PM
me again...  :coffee: I absolutely LOVE the 'lift' varnishing gives to acrylic paintings, bringing out the colour and just giving it that umph   :uglystupid2: lol and I've found that acrylic is actually very vulnerable without it.. it's just plastic after all, and can do with a little bit of protection

But but but...then they'd be acrylics!
:::::::::::::::::FFFFFFFFFLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEEE::::::::::
 :angel:
Oils on the other hand can stand the test of time without any help from varnish - although it does protect it from dust and fly poo  :2funny: or rather, makes it easier to clean  :detective:  .... I loooooooove oils, just wished they would dry like, yesterday!  :licklips: :twothumbs:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: GailBrown on January 15, 2013, 10:22:02 PM
interesting thought about protecting the paintings, never considered that they would be protected
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: lynn p. on January 16, 2013, 01:00:21 AM
Gail--I was wondering what you are going to do with the painting you did where part of it is shiny.  I have the same problem.  Thought I could just varnish and all would be well, but I read that if I do that, part of it will still be different from the rest.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on January 16, 2013, 07:21:07 PM
the varnish will even out the gloss Lynn O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: GailBrown on January 16, 2013, 07:37:31 PM
Haven't done anything yet, tend to procrastinate, but it's good to know that it will all even out, thanks Nolan for that
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on January 17, 2013, 04:14:29 AM
interesting thought about protecting the paintings, never considered that they would be protected

If nothing else you've got the normal air pollution.  Some folks still have wood stoves for heating.  Then there's all the gasoline and diesel and industrial emissions.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: lynn p. on January 17, 2013, 05:02:50 AM
Thanks Nolan for that reassurance.  I think you told me this before but started getting nervous when I read otherwise.   I'll be glad when I have some varnishing experience.  The oil paintings I am saving for varnishing are only 7 months old and not dry yet.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: michael lemieux on January 18, 2013, 08:47:52 PM
Nola, when you paint a sunset or sunrise and you have three mountains far in the distance do we keep it in the darkest shadow or do we make the most distance mountain a little lighter?i am using sap grn, crimson and ultra marine. :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: michael lemieux on January 19, 2013, 04:36:21 PM
Nola, when you paint a sunset or sunrise and you have three mountains far in the distance do we keep it in the darkest shadow or do we make the most distance mountain a little lighter?i am using sap grn, crimson and ultra marine. :)
My scene is winter in New England and mountains are covered with fir and pine trees.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Sarah (arch) on January 19, 2013, 04:44:17 PM
Hi Michael. Nolan will arrive soon and advise, but I just read the PDF on color perspective from the Let's Draw course. What an eye opener for me. The more distant your object(mountains) the more they take on the color of the sky. So not only do they become lighter due to atmospheric particles, the more the color will change, due to color perspective--even when forested. So it is going to depend on how much distance you want to give the furthest mountain. Good luck with your scene! Sounds pretty.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Dorothyofoz on January 27, 2013, 01:52:15 PM
Good advise Sarah. I just went through the introduction course for oils beginners and its all very interesting. I bought myself a colour buster and I'm going to try the monthly challenge again on a larger canvas and in oils.  :knuppel2:  It's bound to be better than my last attempt.  :2funny:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting/ Reflections and cast shadow
Post by: michael lemieux on March 01, 2013, 01:06:33 AM
Nolan, that painting deer in the wild you said my mistake was the reflections should go towards me, does that mean that the cast shadow should be in the opposite side of the tree, Is that correct? so that means not only my reflections were in the wrong direction but the cast shadows as well, Is this correct? I glad I didn't try to sell the painting before you told me what I did wrong. See how fortunate we are because of who you are. thank you again Nolan.
 
Michael
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: gartolf on May 20, 2013, 06:05:54 PM
Hello
I like to make a couple of interior paintings depicting different subjects and also painting of a dishtowel or tablecloth with squares in oil
Is there a rule or tutorial to the best way to get around it without all the squares or lines get muddy or mixed up
Please let me know all help is welcome Hans
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on May 20, 2013, 06:12:18 PM
Hello Hans,
You might like to check out the section here in the Acrylic/Oil Live Classes
http://www.paintbasket.com/members/index.php?board=51.0 (http://www.paintbasket.com/members/index.php?board=51.0) 
I hope this helps.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: gartolf on May 20, 2013, 10:48:09 PM
thanks Lillian ,I am not to concerned about the folds they are not to difficult it is about the fine details of lines and chequers and patterns within the tablecloth an or dishcloth.not using rulers but freehand and to obtain a authentic good look
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lillian on May 21, 2013, 12:29:51 AM
Hans,
 I see.  I thought you were  planning to omit the lines.  Are you planning to do a still life set  up?
You could maybe  do the set up and work with it visually, or perhaps take a photo and work with it from that.
As for the lines, you could leave them until last, after the paint has dried for a day or so and then paint the detail by thinning your paint with medium and using a fine liner brush.
I don't know of a particular tutorial on painting checkered or plaid fabric, but if we give Nolan a nudge, he just might come up with something. 
Another suggestion that might help you out is to check this out.  http://www.paintbasket.com/members/index.php?topic=1814.0 (http://www.paintbasket.com/members/index.php?topic=1814.0)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on May 22, 2013, 08:30:23 PM
what is important is that the chequered blocks, etc., follow the curves in the cloth, so you need to carefully observe the angles and curves in the detail work. I will usually only paint in the large, important details in the drapery.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Northbound on May 28, 2013, 07:56:22 PM
Beginner questions here, bare with me? :)

1.  In the lessons it was suggested to use Liquin as a medium with oils, which I have now but um.. what do I do with it exactly?  Is it used to thin paint that is too thick? Do you just mix it into the paint with the knife?  :confused:

2.  I have also seen walnut oil, stand oil and poppyseed oil mediums.  How are they used?  Are they also mixed directly into paint with a knife?  :-\

3.  How do you get a signature to flow smoothly?  I have some rigger brushes, which I read somewhere was good to use but I just make a mess!  Any tips?  :coolsmiley:

4.  I read that using a product called CitraSolv (made from oranges).  It works very well to clean brushes instead of turpentine which gives me an instant headache.  I've tried it and am very pleased with how well it cleaned my brushes but wonder if anyone had any negative experience with it that I should be aware?  ???
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on May 28, 2013, 08:14:24 PM
1) yes, you use it to thin your paints and mix it into the paint using your knife O0

2) You use them in exactly the same way as Liquin

3) Your paint must be as thin as ink in order to flow nicely off the brush with signing your painting

4) I had not heard of CitraSolv before, but if it works, then use it. O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Northbound on May 28, 2013, 08:43:49 PM
1) yes, you use it to thin your paints and mix it into the paint using your knife O0

2) You use them in exactly the same way as Liquin

3) Your paint must be as thin as ink in order to flow nicely off the brush with signing your painting

4) I had not heard of CitraSolv before, but if it works, then use it. O0

Thanks Nolan!   :smitten:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Honeysuckle73 on August 07, 2013, 05:30:59 PM
Hello to all!  I am so glad to be able to get back on here.  Several months ago I had been painting accasionally and had to be rushed to the hospital. After a long time in the hospital and a very long time recuperating, I decided to try to paint a little at a time. Well, I found my metal encrusted with paint. How do I get it off?  Hope everyone is doing good and painting and drawing like crazy. Missed it all so very much. Maybe I can do a little at a time and get a painting done.  GLAD TO BE BACK even if it is only once in a while. Maybe I can watch some lessons now, that I downloaded so long ago.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Honeysuckle73 on August 07, 2013, 05:44:05 PM
Sorry, not all here yet. Blame it on a ton of meds?  I meant to say metal palette tray.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 07, 2013, 07:01:20 PM
Hello
I like to make a couple of interior paintings depicting different subjects and also painting of a dishtowel or tablecloth with squares in oil
Is there a rule or tutorial to the best way to get around it without all the squares or lines get muddy or mixed up
Please let me know all help is welcome Hans

Michael Wilcox's book; "Blue and Yellow Don't Make Green" is a fantastic resource.  ISBN:  0-9679628-7-0
It tells you why the standard colour wheel you learned in school doesn't work.

Gamblin Paint Co., has a video; "Navigating Color Space" which will help you, too.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 07, 2013, 07:16:13 PM
Beginner questions here, bare with me? :)

1.  In the lessons it was suggested to use Liquin as a medium with oils, which I have now but um.. what do I do with it exactly?  Is it used to thin paint that is too thick? Do you just mix it into the paint with the knife?  :confused:

A:  It can thin paint and it's a dryer.  Some put a thin coat of Liquin on the painting and paint into it.  It helps get thin skies faster and easier.

I'll put a very small amount into a small plastic cap.  When I need to I'll pick up a hint of Liquin, brush the excess onto my palette then pick up paint.

When a paint layer's dry to the touch I'll put a thin coat of Liquin over it and let it dry.  If I screw up the next paint layer I can wipe the new layer away without disturbing what's below the Liquin coat.

It's more problematic if you discover a compositional problem after you've put the protective Liquin coat on, and its dried.  Then you have to paint over those areas and that can take a good bit of time.

2.  I have also seen walnut oil, stand oil and poppyseed oil mediums.  How are they used?  Are they also mixed directly into paint with a knife?  :-\

A:  You can use Walnut Oil to oil out paintings and as a medium to thin paint.  I've never used stand oil or poppy seed.

3.  How do you get a signature to flow smoothly?  I have some rigger brushes, which I read somewhere was good to use but I just make a mess!  Any tips?  :coolsmiley:

A:  You thin the paint so its like ink.  Twirl the brush in the thinned paint to put a point on the brush.  It takes practice, so practice on scraps until you get the hang of it.


4.  I read that using a product called CitraSolv (made from oranges).  It works very well to clean brushes instead of turpentine which gives me an instant headache.  I've tried it and am very pleased with how well it cleaned my brushes but wonder if anyone had any negative experience with it that I should be aware?  ???

Turps is nasty stuff.  I don't use it.  I clean my brushes with Murphy's Oil Soap(tm), but a gentle dish washing soap can be used.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 07, 2013, 07:20:19 PM
Sorry, not all here yet. Blame it on a ton of meds?  I meant to say metal palette tray.

Razor blade.  My palette's a 1/4 inch thick piece of glass with edges and corner sanded.  No metal 'shrieking'.  Have the glass shop cut it from used glass for less cost.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on August 07, 2013, 08:30:23 PM
Welcome back Honeysuckle, so glad you are fighting fit again  :yippee: :yippee: :yippee: :flowers:

What I do to get old paint off my palette is put a layer of turps on it and leave for 5 minutes. I then use my painting knife to scrape off as much of the softened paint as I can. I will repeat this once or twice more. By that time the palette is usually spotlessly clean
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on August 07, 2013, 09:01:46 PM
 :yippee:    :clap: :clap: :clap: :bigwelcome: :clap: :clap: :clap: :yippee: Welcome back Honeysuckle, seems we're in the land of the walking wounded lately!  ;D Glad you're back, take your time and I'm most certain you'll be back sloshing your oils about in no time.  :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Germa on August 07, 2013, 09:10:23 PM
 :welcome: back Honeysuckle!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MSWcrane on August 08, 2013, 11:04:34 PM
Nolan, or anyone else for that matter, is painting dog fur similar to doing people hair?  I would think it would have to contour to their body though.  Is there an oil painting class about dogs? I want to do a painting of my Daughters two dogs, as a gift for her, so need some help!

I am :pullhair:      :2funny:    :jk: 

Really do need help with this painting.  BTW one is a golden retriver (long blondie) and other is pit bull mix (short furred black and white).

 :help: needed
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 09, 2013, 01:30:52 AM
Nolan, or anyone else for that matter, is painting dog fur similar to doing people hair?  I would think it would have to contour to their body though.  Is there an oil painting class about dogs? I want to do a painting of my Daughters two dogs, as a gift for her, so need some help!

I am :pullhair:      :2funny:    :jk: 

Really do need help with this painting.  BTW one is a golden retriver (long blondie) and other is pit bull mix (short furred black and white).

 :help: needed

Youtube's got several tutorials.  Search string; painting fur in oil
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on August 12, 2013, 09:10:20 PM
Youtube will have to do for now- I do have painting animals on my list for when my website is finished and I can start my classes again  O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Northbound on August 18, 2013, 08:17:37 PM
Beginner questions here, bare with me? :)

1.  In the lessons it was suggested to use Liquin as a medium with oils, which I have now but um.. what do I do with it exactly?  Is it used to thin paint that is too thick? Do you just mix it into the paint with the knife?  :confused:

A:  It can thin paint and it's a dryer.  Some put a thin coat of Liquin on the painting and paint into it.  It helps get thin skies faster and easier.

I'll put a very small amount into a small plastic cap.  When I need to I'll pick up a hint of Liquin, brush the excess onto my palette then pick up paint.

When a paint layer's dry to the touch I'll put a thin coat of Liquin over it and let it dry.  If I screw up the next paint layer I can wipe the new layer away without disturbing what's below the Liquin coat.

It's more problematic if you discover a compositional problem after you've put the protective Liquin coat on, and its dried.  Then you have to paint over those areas and that can take a good bit of time.

2.  I have also seen walnut oil, stand oil and poppyseed oil mediums.  How are they used?  Are they also mixed directly into paint with a knife?  :-\

A:  You can use Walnut Oil to oil out paintings and as a medium to thin paint.  I've never used stand oil or poppy seed.

3.  How do you get a signature to flow smoothly?  I have some rigger brushes, which I read somewhere was good to use but I just make a mess!  Any tips?  :coolsmiley:

A:  You thin the paint so its like ink.  Twirl the brush in the thinned paint to put a point on the brush.  It takes practice, so practice on scraps until you get the hang of it.


4.  I read that using a product called CitraSolv (made from oranges).  It works very well to clean brushes instead of turpentine which gives me an instant headache.  I've tried it and am very pleased with how well it cleaned my brushes but wonder if anyone had any negative experience with it that I should be aware?  ???

Turps is nasty stuff.  I don't use it.  I clean my brushes with Murphy's Oil Soap(tm), but a gentle dish washing soap can be used.

I've been using the CitraSolv now and it's awesome, even smells good.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on August 18, 2013, 08:41:23 PM
Stoney,

Those were great answers to her questions.

We use Liquin Original in our senior citizen art class in two ways:
   1. Dip the brush in it before dipping into the paint.  (No need to use it once an area already has it (wet-on-wet).
   2. Once the painting is dry (several months), we put a light coat of the Liquin Original over it as a preservative.

As for cleaning brushes, our teacher has us use Ivory soap (bar).    I keep a Mason jar with a bit of water and a big spring in the bottom.  I slide a piece of Ivory soap through the spring and set brushes in there when I am through with them.  When I am done painting, the brushes are already prewashed. Then just rub the brushes on the bar, rinse, rub again, until the brush is clean.  Works beautifully and very inexpensive. No smell.  Norman Rockwell used Ivory soap to clean his brushes, I heard.

Hope that helps.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 19, 2013, 07:33:31 PM
Stoney,

Those were great answers to her questions.

We use Liquin Original in our senior citizen art class in two ways:
   1. Dip the brush in it before dipping into the paint.  (No need to use it once an area already has it (wet-on-wet).
   2. Once the painting is dry (several months), we put a light coat of the Liquin Original over it as a preservative.

As for cleaning brushes, our teacher has us use Ivory soap (bar).    I keep a Mason jar with a bit of water and a big spring in the bottom.  I slide a piece of Ivory soap through the spring and set brushes in there when I am through with them.  When I am done painting, the brushes are already prewashed. Then just rub the brushes on the bar, rinse, rub again, until the brush is clean.  Works beautifully and very inexpensive. No smell.  Norman Rockwell used Ivory soap to clean his brushes, I heard.

Hope that helps.

aloha

mea

One can get rid of excess medium on an open palette space or on paper towel.  I get rid of the extra on the palette then use that spot to pick up small amounts later.  I put a little Liquin in a plastic top from a medicine container or plastic bottle cap.

I've tried Galkyd, but don't buy it anymore as it did grow mold.

Several drops of Clove Oil in a not super small but smaller than a baby food lid metal or glass lid.  I seal it in my oil palette and the paint will be still fresh three weeks later.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on August 20, 2013, 02:58:51 AM
Our teacher in my senior citizen art classes has us freeze our palettes in a plastic bag from week to week.  Paint stays perfectly fresh and useable in seconds out of the freezer.  Since we only have a 2.5 hour class each week, it sometimes takes four or five weeks to finish a painting.

No waste!


aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 20, 2013, 06:57:04 PM
Putting oil paint palettes in the freezer works wonders--until you run out of freezer space.

You can't do this with acrylics.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MSWcrane on August 20, 2013, 09:16:22 PM
I put my leftover paint on styro plates and wrap and put in freezer, does take up space, I have 5 or 6 in there now ;)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on August 21, 2013, 09:21:18 PM
If you use these:
(http://www.thebraggingmommy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/ps2.jpg)
(used for holding baby formula)

you will use up almost no space in the freezer. You will be amazed at how much paint these hold. I usually put three, even four colours in one layer as the paint sticks to the sides, so they never touch
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MSWcrane on August 21, 2013, 10:13:26 PM
Gosh, I have not been in a baby dept for 48 years, things have changed I am sure, we had nothing like that for formula  :thumbdown:   

I will have to investigate that dept on my next trip to Wal-Mart  :yippee:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on August 22, 2013, 12:52:32 AM
If you use these:
([url]http://www.thebraggingmommy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/ps2.jpg[/url])
(used for holding baby formula)

you will use up almost no space in the freezer. You will be amazed at how much paint these hold. I usually put three, even four colours in one layer as the paint sticks to the sides, so they never touch


They screw into each other.  I use them for inks.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: doina on August 28, 2013, 07:39:50 PM
If you go to JoAnn store on the jewerly/beads section at the orgaizers, you'll find simmilar boxes. I am using them to store seed beads. they are diffeerent sizes. not to expensive and with the 40% off coupon, is more than affordable. Check dollar store too.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MSWcrane on August 29, 2013, 12:00:28 AM
Checked our local Wal-Mart but they didn't have them, will keep looking.
 
Found 'Rubbermaid Easy Find Lids' (Clear, 2 1/2" square x 2 3/4" tall) each one has a  cover that snaps into the bottom of another container, so they also stack.

Baby Containers Cost: on line $19.99 for a stack of 5
Rubbermaid Cost:  $3.99 for set of 2 (can get 10 for $19.95)
Makes Rubbermaid ones Half the price of the Baby ones
Rubbermaid ones are sold in a pack of 2 containers, so you can buy as few as you want.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on September 02, 2013, 06:42:02 PM
I store all my inks, pens, and nibs in an empty tall coffee container with snap lid.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MSWcrane on September 03, 2013, 03:29:44 AM
Another Great Idea Stoney!!   O0

These little snap containers I posted are for leftover oil paints from a current working painting, to keep them from drying out, I do as Nolan said and put them into freezer, works well, without taking up a lot of freezer space.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Germa on September 03, 2013, 07:59:09 AM
We didnīt have those dispenders too, when my son was a baby, but I found such a īmilk powder dispenderī in a  shop where one sells all that baby stuff people need.
I was there to buy a īlittle childrenīs chairī for in our car.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on September 03, 2013, 02:30:50 PM
Another Great Idea Stoney!!   O0

These little snap containers I posted are for leftover oil paints from a current working painting, to keep them from drying out, I do as Nolan said and put them into freezer, works well, without taking up a lot of freezer space.

Warehouse stores, like Costco in the US, sell coffee in 3 lb. (1.36 kg) containers with snap lids instead of the standard 2 lb 7 oz. (1.10 kg).  Either size make good 'drums' for children.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on September 03, 2013, 02:32:02 PM
We didnīt have those dispenders too, when my son was a baby, but I found such a īmilk powder dispenderī in a  shop where one sells all that baby stuff people need.
I was there to buy a īlittle childrenīs chairī for in our car.

In the US, they're called 'car seats'.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Germa on September 03, 2013, 05:33:25 PM
Thanks Stoney, always glad to learn something and you're always very helpful with words I don't know, without giving me the feeling that I'm stupid.  :flowers:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on September 05, 2013, 03:05:45 AM
Thanks Stoney, always glad to learn something and you're always very helpful with words I don't know, without giving me the feeling that I'm stupid.  :flowers:

You're more than welcome.  :)  Learning another language isn't easy, and English is anything but easy.   What is even more difficult is when it comes to slang.  I try not to use it here, but if/when I do I am more than happy to explain if a person asks. I don't want to assume a person doesn't know something.

When I can tell you what the common name for something in the US, I do.

I had to relearn the written language on my own.  Now I'm having more difficulty with it and my spelling has gotten worse.

The most amazing gentleman I've ever met was from Amersfroot.  I met him in Edinburgh, Scotland.  He was a computer programmer and was texting on irc chat, in English, at 120 words per minute.

There's an old joke about Europeans knowing more than one language.  It goes on to say most/many Americans only know one language, and some don't know it well.

In early and middle school I was taught to speak, read, and write Spanish.  Then I forgot most of the spoken language as I never had a chance to use it.  I wouldn't say I was fluent, but could, mostly, make myself understood.

Many many years later I encountered a gentleman in eastern Oregon and greeted him in Spanish (I would try to use what little I remembered when I could).  He stopped and stared then asked me where that long ago teacher was from.  I said I didn't remember, but thought Spain rather than Mexico.  He told me my teacher was from the Basque region of Spain.  He said the 'echoes of the hills' still could be heard in my speech.

When I was in Paris for a few days I could puzzle out the information and text signs.  I know a few words of French which I picked up here and there.

With your spoken language, I would be totally lost and doubt I would be able to puzzle out the written language. So, you are in a much better position than I.  :D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MSWcrane on September 05, 2013, 04:21:36 AM
 :thankyou:  Stoney, that is a very interesting story about the 'Echo of the Hills'... I only know English.  People here, in Florida, say they can still hear my NY accent, after my living here for 20 years.  My ears are not very well trained, I cannot tell where anyone is from by listening to them.  I wish I could, it would be interesting to be able to do that.  You are special to be able to understand a few languages, thanks for sharing with us.  I look forward to reading more of your travels.   :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on September 05, 2013, 04:00:35 PM
:thankyou:  Stoney, that is a very interesting story about the 'Echo of the Hills'... I only know English.  People here, in Florida, say they can still hear my NY accent, after my living here for 20 years.  My ears are not very well trained, I cannot tell where anyone is from by listening to them.  I wish I could, it would be interesting to be able to do that.  You are special to be able to understand a few languages, thanks for sharing with us.  I look forward to reading more of your travels.   :)

The Spanish I learned was long forgotten, except for a few words.  The basis for French, Spanish, and English (although the two former are closer, I believe, to the base) is Latin.  The written languages have shifted from Latin, but often there are similarities enough between them to be able to puzzle out meaning.  It took a bit of time to do it.

Two incidents in Paris.  The tour I was on had 'meal chits' which could be used at various restaurants.  One restaurant in Paris was an Italian restaurant where the French waiters spoke English!

On the way back one evening, two or three of us (out of the 101, and I was the only one from my ship) passed a closed store and some dessert dishes (pre-dishwashers of the automated time) which caught my eye. 

I didn't speak French (although I knew probably six words) and the shop keepers didn't know English.  So, I pointed at the dishes then made a 'square' motion with my hands several times.  They quickly understood I wished them boxed.

I brought them back to Scotland then shipped them from the ship back to the 'states.  Some time after I left the USN, I used them to serve a dessert.  Upon washing them I happened to look at the bottom which had the manufacturing stamp.  I had to laugh.  They were made in England!  I still have those dishes today.  It may be that same box.

The Paris trip was a week before I had to travel from Scotland  (USN base) to England to RAF Lakenheath ( USAF base) for major eye surgery-on both.  I figured if I did go blind, I would have at least seen something.

When I was transferred from Scotland to a DDG in Norfolk, VA., the electrician who taught me that ship's power distribution system (stand three watches with a trainer as all ship's systems differ) had left the ship in Scotland I was on three, or four, months after I got there.

Well, it was full Scots accents (cut them with a broadsword) and slang.  The next day another person, in a different job, asked me what language we were speaking.  I grinned and said; "English".

Years later I was in Biloxi, Miss., for six months of electronics school.  The first six weeks, which equate to a year in college, was basic electronics.  Thereafter you're going through system after system from theory and schematics to working on the equipment then testing anywhere from five to ten days-depending.

Anyway, the barracks had a few washing machines, and dryers, for a heck of a lot of people.  The best time to do laundry's on a Friday or Saturday night-everyone's elsewhere.  There were a few 'school house' type desks there.  I was reading a book when another guy came in to do his laundry.

He was talkative, and I was bored with my book.  So we're talking and he then asks me where I was from.  I replied; "Detroit".

He tried to leap out of his chair, but got caught on the desk arm portion and went over backwards.  Once he got up he said: "I ain't gonna mess with you!"  The only thing I could do was laugh.  I guess having a chat with a person from Detroit wasn't like he expected it to be.

I was married for three months then was gone for six.  I left my wife in Detroit.  One weekend she flew in and we drove to Fort Walton Beach, FL..  Sunday morning we were having breakfast at a pancake house.  The waitress was friendly and would come back to talk to us after taking care of other customers.

After we left, my wife asked me if I knew why the waitress kept coming back.  "She's a friendly lady"; was my reply. 

"No"; my wife said.  "When you talked to me you talked normally.  When you talked to her, you sounded like you were born and raised there, and you had no idea you were doing it."

While home ported in Norfolk, there were people who thought I was from Georgia from my voice.  Go figure.  :)

If you're curious about my years in the military-ask.  I'll gladly answer.  I didn't retire after 20, or more, years.  I was medically retired (disability) before I reached that point.  I did fight the retirement, but then it became (sadly) apparent it was time.  So, it goes.  :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Danielle123 on May 18, 2014, 03:36:12 AM
 :thankyou: Nolan for that free oil wood Ebook it is most interesting.  I red it all and maybe  one day i will try oils but not now my hands are full.  Also thank you for the portrait one, samething in the future i may get my hands in oil. :smitten:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on May 18, 2014, 05:18:21 AM
 :urwelcome:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Zilpa on May 18, 2014, 12:57:38 PM
Go for it Danielle. You won't regret it.  :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Danielle123 on May 19, 2014, 10:56:22 AM
 :thankyou: zilpa for the encouragement, but I will be doing the water colour and pastel for now as well as finishing the lets draw class.   ;)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on June 04, 2014, 05:42:55 PM
I looked at the oil painting classes lesson plan, and it makes no sense at all. Is this really the order in which to take classes? Also, the oil painting club only lists the $99 option for the year. Is there not a monthly option? I'm confused!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: May lynn on June 04, 2014, 09:04:53 PM
Dear Fencepost;

You must have been looking at the STORE.    The $99.00 quoted there is for a yearly CLUB
membership to Oils.   You can also buy a monthly membership for 9.00 each month.

If you want to know more about the New club memberships read the announcement thread on the
forum.   Also, look at the PB home page for more info.

I hope this helps!    :painting:

May lynn
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on June 04, 2014, 11:08:41 PM
 :thankyou: May Lynn. On the home page I clicked on the "Classes" dropdown, not the store. I chose "Oil" and there was only one option for club membership: the yearly option. I have followed the discussions and understand the club memberships. I think the lack of a monthly membership option in oils is a glitch that Nolan can fix. :whistle:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on June 05, 2014, 03:40:42 AM
if you click the + icon to see more info about the class, you will be able to choose between the monthly & yearly option O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on June 05, 2014, 04:21:51 AM
It's fixed!  :thankyou:

Now about the lesson plan for a rank beginner. The lesson plan for oil on the site goes: (in this order)

Realistic flower Painting, both classes
How to mix color
Rule of Thirds
Painting Materials
Tulip 1,2,3
Realistic flower painting secrets 1 and 2 (should I repeat this?)
Portraits 1 thru 6
How to paint bluegum trees
How to paint juicy cherries
Still life series 1 thru 6
Landscapes 1 thru 6
Lakes, rivers and waterfalls 1 and 2
How to paint the sea 1 and 2
Painting snow
Flowers in a meadow
Seashells on the beach
Peaceful stream
Koi pond
Snowy mountain retreat
Sand dunes on the beach
The big 5 series

Is this really what I should do? It seems a bit odd, but then so am I.  :idiot2:

I'll proceed according to your orders, sir!  :squareeyes:
Title: varnishing an acrylic background before painting in oil
Post by: DansArtClass on June 15, 2014, 01:37:59 AM
...quick question...should I varnish an acrylic background before doing my oil painting?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: NHC50 on June 15, 2014, 02:23:08 AM
no

Nina  :flowers:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on June 23, 2014, 05:12:33 PM
Well, I've jumped into oils. Water-based W&N Artisan. Took the preliminary classes, now doing the tulip on a 16 x 20 canvas tablet. This isn't as easy as I had hoped.  :heeha: But I think I will love this medium. Many mistakes so far, but am learning.

Big question: The background was still not nearly dry after almost a week, so I just moved on carefully. I'm made a number of Oops...went a little over the intended line. With the stiill-wet paint underneath, I couldn't make corrections, so I'm assuming I will need to let the whole thing dry thoroughly then paint over the mistakes with the background color.

Lots of other mistakes, but have learned a huge amount in this one project. Instead of jumping ahead, I plan to do a series of tulips until I have a firm grasp on what they have to teach. Great class, Nolan!  :thankyou:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on June 24, 2014, 10:22:56 PM
sounds good Judie :clap: :clap: :clap:

Yes just let the painting dry and then come back and do the touch ups O0

To speed up the drying process, get yourself the drying medium for your brand of paints
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on June 25, 2014, 12:56:58 AM
Thanks Nolan. I'll get some medium.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on July 02, 2014, 04:14:53 PM
For beginning oil painting, I'm using a tablet of 16 x 20 prepared canvas to save money. I tear out a sheet and use map tacks to mount it on a sheet of foam board. Works great. Since I plan to remove the paintings and re-use the foam board, I can store the canvases easily.

Question: Can I layer the paintings with tissue once they are dry? Can I roll them in a tube? If I roll them, should they be rolled painted side out or in?

This question is for when I actually have more than one painting finished.  :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on July 02, 2014, 11:49:41 PM
Judie please don't use tissue paper, it will stick. Remember oil paint takes a lot longer to dry than you think. I have paintings here that were painted years ago and are still a little "sticky" if you lean something against it for a while.

If the paint is thin and it feels well dry, then layer them using a wax based paper - I suggest using the wax paper you use for baking as it is the cheapest.

If you roll your painting into a tube, roll it with the paint on the outside so that if it does crack in the process, the cracks close up again when you unroll the painting.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on July 03, 2014, 12:35:43 AM
Would glassine paper work? I recently acquired a 36" x 50 yard roll on closeout.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on July 03, 2014, 09:40:27 PM
don't know it personally but from what I can see on Wikipedia it should work fine O0 Maybe just give it a test with two paintings for a start to make 100% sure.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on July 03, 2014, 11:23:19 PM
For beginning oil painting, I'm using a tablet of 16 x 20 prepared canvas to save money. I tear out a sheet and use map tacks to mount it on a sheet of foam board. Works great. Since I plan to remove the paintings and re-use the foam board, I can store the canvases easily.
[]


Even cheaper is to go to a framing shop and ask for their scrap mat board.  Spray both sides with a cheap clear acrylic spray paint.  You can also use cardboard or newsprint.  This route with the clear acrylic spray paint is *not* archival.

If you use acrylic gesso to coat newsprint or cardboard then you do get more longevity.  It's then limited to the internal integrity (acid content) of what you're painting on.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on July 05, 2014, 01:51:24 AM
Oil easier than watercolor? Not for this novice.  :'(

I am using WN Artisan Water Mixable Paints. Out of the tube they are very thick and do not flow at all.

I have linseed oil, thinner, and fast-drying mediums.

Available mediums:

Fast Drying Medium — This popular medium improves flow and speeds drying time by approximately 50%. (I am using this. It is thick and slimy, sticky like glue if you get it on your hands, and does not improve flow at all, IMO)

Linseed Oil — The main binder in the Artisan Water Mixable Oil Color line and the most commonly used of all the Artisan Mediums, Artisan Linseed Oil reduces the consistency and improves the flow of the paints

Painting Medium — This medium thins the consistency of Artisan Water Mixable Oils, improves the flow and wetting of colors, and also aids in fine detail work. It dries slowly to a flexible film..

Stand Oil — A more durable type of Linseed Oil, Stand Oil is partially polymerized by being heated in the absence of oxygen, thereby producing a longer drying time.

Thinner — As a substitute for water or combined with it, low odor Artisan Thinner is specially formulated to dilute Artisan Water Mixable Oils. It provides a more oily consistency than water and does not form an emulsion with the paint, thereby producing less color change. It may also be combined with Artisan Fast Drying Medium, Artisan Linseed Oil, and Artisan Stand Oil.

What can I try to get paint to flow from my brush onto the canvas instead of globs that need to be dragged and scrubbed into the canvas,exhibiting nary a crisp edge.I tried the fast-drying medium because anything with white added takes at least a week to become tacky. Don't know if it ever dries fully. Would mixing thinner with the fast-drying stuff be okay? :help:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on July 06, 2014, 01:19:22 AM
This video should get you going :
Winsor & Newton Artisan Water Mixable Oil Paint (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHoi_ECqnKU#ws)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on July 08, 2014, 04:37:22 PM
 :thankyou: Nolan. I overlooked your reply somehow and thought you had forgotten me.  :2funny:

Good video, and a search of the net gave more information. The one thing I can't find yet is just how to use a medium.

I want a paint that flows readily. Water could work, but has major problems. Is just thinner a good choice? Linseed oil? Painting medium? How much is too much? (ration of paint/medium) Can I mix painting medium or linseed oil with fast-drying medium? Again, how much.

I am deeply engaged in a second tulip painting using a different photo from the PDF and learning a great deal about how the paint handles and experimenting with different mediums. It is a mess, but a great learning experience. Will post it if I ever manage to finish it.  :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on July 08, 2014, 09:16:57 PM
having not worked with the water mixable oils I can't recommend a medium, but I am sure that one of the manufacturer recommended mediums will work just fine. I use my medium very sparingly, unless the paint is very thick. I usually just ad enough to get a creamy consistency for regular painting
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Germa on July 12, 2014, 01:33:26 PM
you can't use linseed or thinner for water mixable oils; they're not water mixable and will fight with your paint.
You could use water, not to much since it could break colours if you thin the paint TOO much.

You should buy some special water mixable oil painter medium in your art store, if they sell the paint, they will sell the proper medium too, I guess.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fencepost on July 12, 2014, 02:48:43 PM
 :thankyou: Germa. When I mention linseed oil or thinner, I am referring to the water-mixable ones made by the manufacturer of my paints. I'm trying to figure out which to use and how much. I'm gradually getting the hang of it, I think. So much to learn!!!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on September 09, 2014, 02:53:32 PM
Is the best way to varnish one using a brush, or is it OK to use a spray on?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on September 09, 2014, 08:30:54 PM
I use a brush, but you can spray too - just make sure you get an even coat
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on September 09, 2014, 08:45:22 PM
Thanks, Nolan.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on October 30, 2014, 07:54:21 PM
I have some questions regarding thinning with medium.   Are OMS and bought mediums interchangeable?   Does one paint with a 'watery' paint (one mixed with a fair amount of medium) first and then use more paint to make it 'stick' to the layer underneath, or visa versa ?   I'm very confused with 'fat' and 'lean'.  Which is 'fat' and which is 'lean'?  Which goes on first?    Finally, is bought mediums 'fatter' than OMS?    :help:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on October 30, 2014, 08:40:41 PM
please just clarify what OMS is Lil

Fat over lean refers to the amount of oil in the paint. Think of the oil / painting medium as being the fat and you will never forget.

In other words you start off with as little oil in the paint as possible, then gradually add more oil into subsequent layers. This allows the paint to dry without cracking
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on October 31, 2014, 12:49:25 AM
Sorry, Nolan.   OMS - Odourless Mineral Spirits.  :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on October 31, 2014, 12:52:20 AM
That does clear things up a bit.   But is mineral spirits the same as medium?   It doesn't 'feel' the same when mixing to me.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: C.Bodine on October 31, 2014, 02:20:40 PM
Lil, I don't believe Nolan recommends OMS :) as a medium. Since it is used to clean your brushes of oil paint, by breaking the oil down, it might be damaging to your painting. Wait, of course, for his thoughts on the subject, though.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on November 01, 2014, 01:31:10 AM
Thanks, Christina.   It certainly is a lot different from watercolours, lol.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: C.Bodine on November 01, 2014, 01:51:36 AM
Yes, it is!  I love oils, but so much to it! That is why I have tried my hand at wc. I love the easy use and clean up, but boy is it hard to deal with something you can't control! We will see how long I last in wc!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on November 01, 2014, 04:12:53 PM
C., you'll be with us into the next millenium! You know you just love playing in those puddles!  (https://d326oobcc22bax.cloudfront.net/content/50390/1508536.GIF) (http://www.Quebles.com/Hotmail-Tools/Emoticons/)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on November 01, 2014, 08:47:02 PM
Christina is correct, I only recommend thinning your paints with oil or a reputable medium O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Lil on November 05, 2014, 12:18:39 AM
Everything regarding oil painting is basically new to me, so sorry, I have to ask - what kind of oil?  :blush: :)     
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Tania on November 05, 2014, 12:56:27 AM
Lil there are various kinds of oil you can use for medium - linseed oil, walnut oil, etc. You would find them near the oil paints in an art supply store. Hope that helps! :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: C.Bodine on November 05, 2014, 03:31:25 AM
Lol! you are right, Val! I'm here to stay.

 Lil, there is no need to apologize for asking a question! It is the only way to learn.  You have asked the same questions most of us have asked when we started with oils. Ask about anything you don't understand. Someone will have an answer! :)
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: iesepies on November 05, 2014, 09:02:16 AM
Hi to all,

I'm just starting with oil paint and am confused by the information about 'fat over lean'.
What I do not understand is: when you add medium you make your paint fatter, but isn't it also making your paint opacity less? And how can you end with the pure paint (as it comes out of the tube), the pure paint contains no added fat (medium) so it can never be fatter than the paint with added medium.

uhm ... I'm confused.

Does anyone have the answer?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: ncwren on November 05, 2014, 01:06:58 PM
Fat over lean=more medium
It has to do with drying and the layers
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: iesepies on November 05, 2014, 03:01:08 PM
Hi Ncwren,

Yes indeed, it has to do with drying and layers.

But can I apply in the last layer the paint pure (without medium) ? Someone told me to end with the paint as it is.

I think that this is not possible because that (last) layer will always be leaner than the previous layer with medium.

That is what I don't understand.

I hope someone can explain ....



Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: iesepies on November 05, 2014, 06:07:00 PM
Aha!   :2funny: I think I have the answer:
although medium contains oil, it will make paint leaner.
My mistake was that I thought that medium makes paint fatter because it contains oil.
Now I know that I can make the paint-medium-mix fatter by means of changing the percentage of the medium.
And in this way I can end with a layer of paint without medium.

One problem solved!

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Germa on November 05, 2014, 06:12:51 PM
No, problem not solved; oil makes paint fatter.  ;) :D
Fatter paint has a higher oil/ pigment ratio than lean paint.
Everything depends on the medium you add.
If you put pure oil to your paint, it makes your paint always fatter.
Some people add terps to their paint for first layers, or a medium that contains a kind of terps, that makes your paint  leaner.
A medium with much oil and less other stuff that makes your paint dry quicker makes your paint fatter, a medium that speeds up your drying time a lot and has not to much oil in it, makes your paint leaner.

You may be confused with thin and thick paint, but that's a different story. ;)

Fat paint has a high oil/pigment ratio, lean paint has e low oil/pigment ratio.

The idea that you have to end with a layer paint, right out of the tube, without any medium; never heard of it.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on November 05, 2014, 06:36:46 PM
Thank, Germa.  That was a good explanation.  I understand the fat-lean thing better now.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on November 05, 2014, 07:59:52 PM
fat = oil

You don't want to end with a layer of neat paint if you have used medium underneath. HERE  (http://www.paintbasket.com/members/index.php?topic=1046.0)is a topic where we have discussed this topic at great length O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: iesepies on November 06, 2014, 08:28:17 AM
 :thankyou: to all of you! I think I have some understanding of the matter now.
I'll just start painting and get familiar with the matererials.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on November 06, 2014, 10:08:54 PM
 :yippee: :gl:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Mariep on December 01, 2014, 07:26:47 AM
I have watched the color mixing tutorial for the 3rd time.  Every time the light bulb in my head brightens up a little more and the understanding of color get better!!!    :yippee: :yippee: :yippee: :yippee: WHOW!!!! 

Thanks Nolan AGAIN for the brilliant DVD and sharing your knowledge in detail.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on December 01, 2014, 02:16:05 PM
I'm with you Marie.  O0 The colour mixing video and the colour wheel are my two most watched videos. Always seem to get a better grip on it each time. Fantastic explanations Nolan & Dennis.  :smart: +  :smart:   =  a better me! :smart:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on December 01, 2014, 04:16:45 PM
Fully agree,   I also watched the basic videos a few times, I even write bullet-style note (like when I was in school  ::) ), and each time I understand another layer of what is said and why. It is something I will do periodically for a long time.  I have watched Dennis' lecture on Composition.  What an eye opener, I keep posing, thinking, and rewinding.  Thank goodness f last 30 seconds rewinding feature... best invention since the little yellow sticky labels and velcro!

I also watched the W&N video below that Nolan referred to.   I did not think much of watersoluble oil, which by definition has to modify the chemical bound to make it both lipophilic and lipophobic.  Beside being a nice alternative for those sensitive to fumes and turps, I just realized it is a good option for travelling when dangerous goods cannot be carried, such as on airplanes.  It is not always easy to quickly find where to get a small can of trup in foreign country. 

But I have a question about brushes.    At the end of the W&N video, the presenter recommends using only synthetic brushes, commenting that natural hair will behave differently as they swell with remaining water after washing "like a bad hair day".  Obviously referring to the on-going rinsing/washing of the brushes during the painting session. Okay, but with that logic one should not use natural hair brushes for watercolor either!    I am not a watercoulorist but I am pretty sure that I saw natural hair burshes in Dennis' hands.   Am I wrong?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: ncwren on December 01, 2014, 05:49:50 PM
Annie water and oil don't mix so you would have to let thw brushes dry completely with oil.
The hairs swelling (retaining) with watercolor does not matter.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Val on December 01, 2014, 05:54:11 PM
Annie, my w/c brushes are mostly sable, or squirrel hair. It's easy enough to give a gentle squeeze or wipe with a paper towel or cloth towel and you're good to go. So excess water retention is not really a problem... except when 'I' am mixing colours!  ;D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on December 01, 2014, 06:24:21 PM
Natalie, yes for course with oil the brushes must dry.  My question was re: Watersoluble Oil where the brushes are cleaned in water during the painting session.

Val, thank you very much for your reply.   It reinforced to me that drying in the towel should be good enough for hair brushes.

Happy  :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: ncwren on December 01, 2014, 06:32:49 PM
Fully agree,   I also watched the basic videos a few times, I even write bullet-style note (like when I was in school  ::) ), and each time I understand another layer of what is said and why. It is something I will do periodically for a long time.  I have watched Dennis' lecture on Composition.  What an eye opener, I keep posing, thinking, and rewinding.  Thank goodness f last 30 seconds rewinding feature... best invention since the little yellow sticky labels and velcro!

I also watched the W&N video below that Nolan referred to.   I did not think much of watersoluble oil, which by definition has to modify the chemical bound to make it both lipophilic and lipophobic.  Beside being a nice alternative for those sensitive to fumes and turps, I just realized it is a good option for travelling when dangerous goods cannot be carried, such as on airplanes.  It is not always easy to quickly find where to get a small can of trup in foreign country. 

But I have a question about brushes.    At the end of the W&N video, the presenter recommends using only synthetic brushes, commenting that natural hair will behave differently as they swell with remaining water after washing "like a bad hair day".  Obviously referring to the on-going rinsing/washing of the brushes during the painting session. Okay, but with that logic one should not use natural hair brushes for watercolor either!    I am not a watercoulorist but I am pretty sure that I saw natural hair burshes in Dennis' hands.   Am I wrong?
I was responding to your question about watercolors...
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: dcb1968 on January 13, 2015, 02:06:35 PM
I have been told to wait at least six months before varnishing an oil painting to allow the paint to thoroughly dry - a year if you have the color red.  :gl:

I have a question - how can I sketch on linen canvas?   I bought one to try and I tried to use graphite like on cotton canvas and it will not adhere.  Any suggestions? :-\
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on January 14, 2015, 08:46:24 PM
I would use a thinned paint. Charcoal may also work?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on January 26, 2015, 01:43:03 PM
Heard today at art that Dettol is brilliant for use as a brush cleaner, removes all oil.  Haven't tried it yet myself but am going to for sure!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on January 26, 2015, 03:00:25 PM
Interesting.  Dettol is a bran name, are you taking about the antiseptic liquid or the soap bar?

Also is it used in place of the turp cleaner, or the following wash with soap?

Ingredient includes an alcohol (could this damage the brushes in the long run?), as well as oils.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on January 26, 2015, 03:11:26 PM
Yes Annie they were talking about the liquid Dettol.  One said she no longer uses turps for cleaning at all, but the teacher uses it in place of brush cleaner (what I use about once a year, but it is really toxic). Will let you know how it works.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on January 26, 2015, 09:00:47 PM
so instead of smelling like turps you will smell like a hospital ;D
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on January 26, 2015, 09:33:57 PM
 :2funny:  :2funny: :2funny:

It seems there are as many ideas about how to wash brushes as there are artists!

I think the real danger would be in ingesting heavy metals for the pigments.   

Also, I often ear artists say they use 'odourless paint thinner/turp' because they are saver.   Chronic exposure to volatile carbohydrates are dangerous to the respiratory system, and thinking that odorless equal safe is potentially very dangerous as it confer a sense of false security.  Those with sensitivity and allergy, of course, will get immediate problem.  The only advantage to odorless, is that is doesn't bother us so much.  It should be use in a ventilated environment as any volatile.

I also have heard artists say they use acrylics instead of oils to protect the environment.  I don't really understand that, acrylic medium is a polymer (plastic) so not easily degradable; not sure I see why oil would be such a problem.   Again I think the pigment is the potential problem... yet, most don't think much of getting red plastic bowl for the kitchen.  I would think that 'artist pollution' is a very small contribution to the world problem, yet we should still be considerate not to waste. 

Where I live, all left over house paints can be brought to any fire stations for proper disposal.  It is illegal to simply dump them in the trash.  Some acrylic artists make a point of dumping there left over paint and the water that rinse their brushes into disposable buckets, let it evaporate and periodically drop them at the local station.  It also safe the house pipes!

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on January 28, 2015, 02:36:12 PM
Is it normal for a painting to go quite dull when drying.  I keep adding more layers to try and brighten it up, but it just results in duller patches again.  I do not use much, if any medium? :'( :'( :tickedoff: :confused:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: ncwren on January 28, 2015, 02:49:32 PM
I haven't noticed that with mine.  :confused:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on February 07, 2015, 03:40:11 PM
Tks NCWREN. Here is what I am talking about, there is a huge oily patch in the darkest left part of the painting and the whole painting has this dull look about it!  Too much paint perhaps? :crazy2: :crazy2: :uglystupid2:
[smd id=19649]
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on February 07, 2015, 03:42:09 PM
Guess that should read
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on February 07, 2015, 06:26:15 PM
Ms. Fig,

What a nice painting. Love the smoke coming from the chimney.  I think I would have put a dark color on the doors, rather than having them look open (well, maybe they are open to bring in all that fresh air).

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on February 07, 2015, 06:31:14 PM
Ms. Fig,

When we finish an oil painting in my senior citizen art class, we brush (with a foam brush) a light coat of Liquin Original over it.  It instantly perks up the dullness of a painting, plus provides the final protective coat.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on February 08, 2015, 04:12:35 AM
Thanks Mea, does that not make it sticky?

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on February 08, 2015, 06:25:41 AM
The Liquin Original is dry in a day.  We put the Liquin Original on all the year's paintings the week before our annual exhibit.  They are ready to frame the next day - not a  problem.  We have more than 140 oil paintings in our exhibit and we use it on all of them.  We use the foam brushes for the applications, then throw them out (maybe do 20 or so with one brush).

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Fig Artist on February 08, 2015, 01:58:13 PM
 :thankyou::thanks Mea, will give it a try!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on February 08, 2015, 02:46:54 PM
Mea, I assume the oil painting should be well cured before you apply the liguin.

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Bellarina on February 08, 2015, 03:53:07 PM
Never knew you can use liquid as a varnish, always thought it was mixed with the oil paint.  Learn something new everyday.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on February 08, 2015, 07:37:58 PM
Yes, Annie, three months minimum, unless it has a lot of white, then an even longer wait.  The only one we cheat on is the one done closest to the exhibit - maybe a month on that one.  Not sure what my teacher does if that one has a lot of white - maybe not coat it until after the exhibit.

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on February 19, 2015, 08:25:50 PM
adding even just a little bit of painting medium into each colour you mix will help to keep the paint glossy when it is dry
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on February 20, 2015, 12:12:23 AM
Would that also protect the oil painting from sun damage?  Is it only the ultraviolet waves that damage the pigments... assuming normal temperature?
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on February 22, 2015, 09:17:27 PM
I don't think it will protect against sun damage no
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on February 23, 2015, 04:34:56 AM
Sun exposure:

Many acrylic paintings (not mine  :( ) in our house are exposed to the sun... any recommendations for protection? 

Most are canvas stretched on stretcher bars... no glass, etc.  They are too many of them.   Actually, the walls looks like a gallery...

I would appreciate learning how to protect them, while keeping them on display...

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Bellarina on February 23, 2015, 10:48:23 AM
You might want to have a go with this:
Lascaux UV Protect, sold by Dick Blick.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: beachkid on June 08, 2015, 05:51:27 PM
You can tell I am a newbie by this question  :)  Is there a course starting with a beginner for an Oil painting class like the Lets Draw class? :help:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: ncwren on June 09, 2015, 10:58:21 AM
If you look under classes you can bring up a lesson plan for each medium. I think all of them have the first few listed as free.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Terri1258 on September 04, 2016, 09:43:13 AM
Hi all. I have just done my first couple of oil paintings and have been using water mixable oils too. My question is....when or if it is necessary to varnish these paintings?
The first one I completed a month ago and is still wet....mind you, we have had a wet Winter this year.
As an absolute beginner with oils...I have no clue how long they will take to dry.
 :uglystupid2: :confused:
Thank you all for your amazing support.
 :hug: XXXS Terri
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: anabella on October 20, 2016, 01:25:41 PM
Hi, I need your help, please.  :help:

Its difficult to explain. My second hand of paint on the black/blue color, it was find until dry now it looks opaque, you can see the difference with the rest of the painting. What can I do?

 :thankyou:
Anabella
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: MaryAnne Long on October 20, 2016, 11:51:51 PM
Anabella,

I am not certain exactly what you mean, but can you remove the paint from the spot that is not right, then repaint it?  Or can you put a light glaze over the spot without removing the underlayer?

Can you post a photo so that we can offer better help?

aloha

mea
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: C Barnes on March 28, 2017, 04:35:43 PM
Hi Nolan,
  What brand of oils do you prefer to use.  Which brand did you use to paint the kitchen spoons?

Also, what brand of medium do you use ?  (again, the spoons painting)

Thanks for your time,
  Carolyn Barnes I
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on March 28, 2017, 07:28:08 PM
I don't have a preferred oil paint brand and usually just buy what is available. As a result I have a variety of brands in my box.

The medium I use is one that Dennis makes
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on March 28, 2017, 10:39:10 PM
 :thankyou: Robyn.  Happy to hear from you.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: chirchri on May 03, 2017, 03:37:08 AM
What is the best way to dry oil paint faster
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on May 03, 2017, 05:37:03 PM
By adding Liquin Original from W&N to your paint, and leave the painting in a warm dry environment if possible.

Adding oil does the opposite, it increases the curing time.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on May 10, 2017, 08:21:41 PM
What is the best way to dry oil paint faster

If it's summertime where you are; park a vehicle in the sun with the windows closed and put the painting on the dashboard for a couple of days.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on May 11, 2017, 02:48:42 AM
Great pointer Stoney... if you don't live in Canada ... but okay maybe in TO (Toronto) in mid-July  :clap: :clap: :clap

 :1hug:

Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on June 08, 2017, 11:51:13 PM
Great pointer Stoney... if you don't live in Canada ... but okay maybe in TO (Toronto) in mid-July  :clap: :clap: :clap

 :1hug:

There is that, yes.  I'm aware folks in Winnipeg call it 'Winter Peg'.  Yikes!  I wouldn't have any movement in my hands at the temperatures they get.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Abbietaya on July 24, 2017, 10:35:52 AM
Hi nolan and all oil artist,
I watch my first oil video lesson yesterday or rather part 1 of it. First of all i must say i am no too sure about oils, the fact thst they take upto 6 months to dry and the migraine causing diluting mediums, so i might be predudice about them. However, plse can you only dorb with oil? Why can't you paint normally? Why big globs of paint?
Just asking!

I have some windsor and newton oil sticks which say they are oil paint mixed with a littke wax. I am consider using these with a brush and painting normally, to me the advantage of the oil stick is personally, I could use them as paint without the noxious smells. I have watched artist daub with these sticks also and stared in amazement at the mess they have created not only on the canvas but on themselves! Infact, 1 youtube video may me think of kindergarten 2 year olds, infact that is probably an insult to the 2 years olds. Who could do a far better job! Sorry but i don't understand!
Tske care
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on July 24, 2017, 12:33:28 PM
Great pointer Stoney... if you don't live in Canada ... but okay maybe in TO (Toronto) in mid-July  :clap: :clap: :clap

 :1hug:

There is that, yes.  I'm aware folks in Winnipeg call it 'Winter Peg'.  Yikes!  I wouldn't have any movement in my hands at the temperatures they get.

Right you are, and neither in your toes.
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on July 24, 2017, 01:01:41 PM
Hi Abbietaya,

I don't understand your post.  What do you mean by painting normally?  Which video are you referring to?

I think every artist is attracted to a preferred medium for various reasons, people prefer acrylic because it dries fast and errors are easy to cover up, others to oil because it dries slow and you can have long painting session, then again some love watercolour for their lack of mess and ease to travel with, etc. etc.

Perhaps acrylics, if you are concerned about the volatile solvant.

What I have learned is that you only come to appreciate the true values of a medium after you have master some of the basic, so a few lessons.  I know, I used to think that watercolour was an impossible medium.  It was a lot of effort to try it, but know I love it and it is my favorite medium when I travel or have only an hour available.  For longer in house session I prefer  the long open time of oil.

Find your medium and have fun painting.

P.S.  The oil sticks are great for encaustic mixed-media
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Abbietaya on July 24, 2017, 07:07:29 PM
Hi annie,

Sorry if i offended !
When i say paint normally i mean brush the paint not daub and blob.. its true i personally don't care for oils they are toxic in my opinion. But the oil sticks allow brush painting without the mediums though some medium can be used to thin them.. i am going to play with them in the same way i play with the water colour pastels.  They will last a long time that way.. the video was on youtube and personally i found disgraceful,  it it was a person i don't know , i came across it when looking at the paint pouring method. Which is acrylic but this video popped up and to say the person had more paint on themselves than the canvas isn't an exaggeration. I watched a  lesson by Nolan just part one so far and notice he too daubed the paint and i began to wonder if this is how oils are meant to be used... i guess its going to be a medium i will never understand nor i feel grow to love. Thanks anyway.
 :thankyou: :smitten: :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: nolan on July 24, 2017, 08:45:17 PM
Hi Abbie

You can paint in many different styles using oil paint, that is what makes it popular.

I suggest you watch one or two more of my oil classes to see various techniques before you decide O0
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Abbietaya on July 25, 2017, 02:12:55 AM
 :thankyou: :smitten: :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Abbietaya on July 25, 2017, 09:34:31 AM
Hi,
I found an artist on another platform who has given me advice , she paints in oils exactly how i want to and she gave me a tip on non toxic mediums to use. Unfortunately, she has not renewed her membership to the platform and i was on as a guest so our conversation was brief but very informative.
Take care
 :smitten: :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Annie. on July 25, 2017, 12:51:59 PM
Nothing offensive in your post, and definitively no offence taking.  I just did not understand what you were saying by painting normally, and it made the conte t of your post incomprehensive to me.  Your explanation clarified this.

Maybe you should read some of the topic in the oil section.  Tonnes of information, including a post about non-turp solvants and good ones with that are odourless.  Alternative ways to wash oil brushes, etc.  And if oil is not for you, research acrylics or watercolor.  There are also many lessons on pastels, ink and wash, and drawing.  Truly something for everyone and for every taste.

Good luck!
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: Abbietaya on July 25, 2017, 02:09:58 PM
 :thankyou: :smitten: :painting:
Title: Re: Anything Oil Painting
Post by: stoney on July 26, 2017, 05:04:08 PM
You don't have to use Mineral Spirits or Odorless Mineral Spirits (OMS) in your paint, or any medium at all.  I suggest having good air flow through the room if you use Mineral Spirits in any form.

I don't use any Medium in my paint unless there's a need to have my paint thinned to flow more at a specific point in a painting.  In that case, I'll either use a bit of Liquin or Walnut Oil.