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Author Topic: Painting on gessoed board  (Read 107 times)

EmmaLee

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on: June 17, 2019, 02:58:54 PM
I have a client asking for a painting to be done on a 10x12” canvas. This is a very odd size but she has an antique frame she wants it to go into. I’m thinking about cutting a piece of Masonite hard board to size and gessoing it. It seems to be a popular painting surface. Has anyone done this before? I don’t want to sell her anything that isn’t archival.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2019, 03:02:17 PM by EmmaLee »
EmmaLee


robynann

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Reply #1 on: June 17, 2019, 05:23:47 PM
I paint on Masonite all the time. I triple prime it using a roller to roll out the Gesso to make an egg shell soft finish. I sand in between layers and being I prefer a smooth surface I sand my last layer too. That's up to you. I love Masonite to do my Portraits on. And it's so affordable. Don't get me wrong I'll take a Linen Canvas also. LOL
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nolan

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Reply #2 on: June 17, 2019, 08:21:52 PM
you can do that. The other option is to purchase a canvas panel that is bigger, then use a carpet knife and steel ruler to trim it to size O0
 :gl: with the commission :yippee:


NHC50

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Reply #3 on: July 10, 2019, 04:15:10 AM
I have glued canvas onto a board.
Nina  :flowers:
Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the ground each morning, the devil says. "OH NO, SHES UP!"


scouserl41

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Reply #4 on: July 10, 2019, 12:51:12 PM
I use Masonite (hardboard) a lot. I think Grumbacher has a piece on the proper treatment for painting on it. Basically there is a LOT of misinformation regarding hardboard due to changes in the way the boards are manufactured.

The old methods involved oil and that interfered with getting a good bond to the surface.

The good news is that the stuff we get today is made using water based material and the only prep needed before gesso is to wipe the surface with a clean cloth dampened with denatured alcohol to get fingerprints etc off the surface.

I follow their recommendations and roll on 3 coats of gesso letting each coat dry before adding the next. I don't sand between coats or sand the surface prior to gesso. Makes it really easy.

I have some signs I made several years ago on hardboard that get knocked around the inside of our motorhome and propped up in the window when we park and they show no signs of chipping or flaking.

Hardboard comes in different thicknesses so for a commission I'd pick a thicker board, maybe 1/4"? A whole sheet 4' x 8' is probably about $10 and if you get it from the home center you can get the guy on the big saw to cut it for you. My favorite is to get them to cut it into 2 x 4' squares, stack them and cut them in half, stack them again and cut them in half again which gives you 12" wide by 4' pieces. If you then stack them and turn the stack sideways 3 equal cuts gives you a whole pile of 12 x 16 boards for very little outlay. If you get the hardboard with 2 smooth sides you can gesso both sides and double the amount of paintings you can do! I did this extensively when I was doing portrait classes every week.

Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


EmmaLee

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Reply #5 on: July 11, 2019, 12:48:16 PM
Great information! Thank you! I ended up going to my art supply store and bought a piece of pre-gessoed Ampersand hardboard to cut to size. It was pretty pricey, $10 for an 11x14” board (I ended up having to go buy another one when my sweet husband cut the first one to the wrong size). :thumbdown: Next time I’ll definitely be going to the home improvement store for a big sheet. I enjoyed painting on the board and as a bonus my oils dried way faster than normal. I don’t know why, but I loved that.
EmmaLee


nolan

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Reply #6 on: July 14, 2019, 10:01:12 PM
the paint tends to absorb into the gesso'd board which makes it dry faster