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Author Topic: Adding the next Color Up and White Only if Necessary  (Read 1782 times)

patindaytona

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on: November 10, 2011, 08:49:42 PM
On the portraits, you used white to lighten the color values. Now I'm confused. I though you're supposed to add the next color up, then white only if necessary.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


C.Bodine

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Reply #1 on: November 10, 2011, 09:02:09 PM
Pat,  I think adding the next color up BRIGHTENS the color and white LIGHTENS the color.
Christina


dennis

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Reply #2 on: November 10, 2011, 09:13:09 PM
You first lighten the colour with white and because it normally becomes a dull chalky colour you have brighten it with the next colour up towards yellow.

Lighten then brighten.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


thegrindre

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Reply #3 on: November 10, 2011, 09:16:17 PM
It's not fare to confuse us.  :2funny:
I'm with CB and Pat and thought Nolan teaches to brighten then lighten if necessary.  :pullhair:
a.k.a. Rick
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patindaytona

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Reply #4 on: November 10, 2011, 11:11:16 PM
Ok Dennis. So...since white will "grey" a color just as a black does. Likewise, when you use a black (chromatic of course) to grey DOWN a color, this is why Nolan added more of the next color down to it again....to brighten it up (exactly like what you're saying here with the white paint)
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #5 on: November 10, 2011, 11:21:19 PM
I teach to add the next colour up first to ensure you keep the chroma (vibrancy) of the colour, then add white if required otherwise the guys get lazy and just add white - this way you never get chalky colours.

In the case where I just added white in this weeks demo, it was into the highlight colour already, so I was just interested in getting a lighter tonal value of my highlight colour. I could have added more of the next colour up, but as the mix already had a lot of white in it, it wouldn't have made a significant difference. Does that make sense?


nolan

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Reply #6 on: November 10, 2011, 11:24:05 PM
Oh yes, and then also to just clarify - when matching a light colour, then you get the tonal value correct first by adding white and then adjust from there. Once you have the tonal value correct, then you will find it is easier to see which colour is missing from your mix.


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: November 11, 2011, 01:00:18 AM
Nolan, it makes sense to me now. In fact I remember that reading about exactly what you're saying a long time ago somewhere in my notes on how you mainly need that extra chroma when brightening up a darker color only.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #8 on: November 11, 2011, 01:55:05 AM
I take the route via the west coast to Wellington while Nolan takes the east coast road. We both arrive at the same place - only a few minutes apart ;) ;D O0 All depends on the scenery along the way :clap: :clap:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: November 11, 2011, 02:42:48 AM
..got it Dennis.
Nolan, is it easier for you to actually DO all the things  you do in painting than it is to have to THINK and explain them? Probably is second nature for you. Sure would be nice.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #10 on: November 11, 2011, 03:42:27 AM
I, too, got it Dennis.  O0
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


nolan

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Reply #11 on: November 11, 2011, 07:34:30 PM
now that is a scary eye avatar you have now Pat  :eek:  ;D

I am pretty used to doing and saying the same thing I have been doing it for so long, but I do sometimes slip up too O0


patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: November 11, 2011, 07:52:54 PM
I'm going to limit my time per day painting. I think it's best to cringe and bear the anxiety and pressure of doing it very slow and deliberate than to speed up and then re-correct and blame myself for not trying harder the first run thru.  My frustration quickly takes over. Just one bite of the elephant per day ;D
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #13 on: November 11, 2011, 10:49:37 PM
 :smart: