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Author Topic: Recommended Canvas sizes  (Read 1523 times)

Kelley

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on: October 09, 2010, 09:56:19 PM
do you have a recommended size to work with?  I presently have two 40 X 60 cm (16 X 20 in.) canvas panels and two 61 X 91 cm (24 X 36 in.) prepared canvases I've already prepared with a couple layers of gesso. 
« Last Edit: October 09, 2010, 11:16:13 PM by nolan »
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #1 on: October 09, 2010, 11:22:05 PM
I have moved this question to it's own topic as I think it merits it's own thread.

I can't recommend any particular size of canvas as being best, it all depends on the artist and what you feel comfortable painting on, the subject matter you are painting and where you are painting.

What I can say is that with our Saturday workshops we recommend the guys use a 16x20" canvas as we have found that anything bigger becomes a battle to complete in one day.

Smaller isn't always better or easier though, eg. if you are new at portraits I always recommend a bigger canvas (16x20" plus) as a small portrait has to be 100% accurate or the errors in the portrait become glaringly obvious.

On the other hand, if you are painting outdoors, then a smaller canvas (9x12") is usually better because you have very limited time to capture the scene before the lighting changes too much.

Hope that helps.


Kelley

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Reply #2 on: October 10, 2010, 11:33:15 PM
That is actually a good guide, especially if I am in a hurry.  I'll reserve the two larger canvases for when I have a lot of time I can spend on details or more elaborate scenery.  Thank you Nolan!
« Last Edit: November 10, 2010, 07:00:39 AM by Kelley »
Kelley


bottleman

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Reply #3 on: November 10, 2010, 05:56:51 AM
I once took a painting class where the first work had to be 4 by 3 feet, regardless of style or subject matter. The idea was that it would "magnify" your weaknesses, showing what needed immediate attention.

One tip for a canvas that is larger than what you normally use is to do exactly what you usually do, except with a larger brush.


nolan

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Reply #4 on: November 10, 2010, 07:45:17 AM
:bigwelcome: to the site Bottleman

More often than not painting on a bigger canvas is actually easier than a small one, especially for subjects like faces where a small mistake on a small canvas can look amplified.

PS - enjoyed the paintings on your site very much, I have added a link to your site on our friends page O0


bottleman

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Reply #5 on: November 10, 2010, 08:19:25 AM
I've always found that when an actual item, such as a portrait or still life, is painted larger than life, that in itself becomes an abstraction; you are seeing something in a way you usually don't.  Abstraction is about bending/breaking certain rules, or an alternate method of visual expression, hence an error in a face could be interpreted as deliberate.

Thank you for the kind words, and for adding me to your friends page.