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Author Topic: PJ's Adventures....  (Read 102097 times)

linley.plester

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Reply #1560 on: January 29, 2018, 12:49:50 AM
 :2funny: :2funny:  Val, I think we might include Stoney as the third PB member in the 'deranged sense of humour' category, along with you and me! still chuckling... :2funny: :2funny:


stoney

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Reply #1561 on: January 29, 2018, 12:53:14 AM
Thanks Mea, he's doing fine and once he's over the tired feeling should be tip top. How do I know this? He's already starting to annoy me! In a good way.  ;D

He's getting back to normal.  A good sign.


stoney

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Reply #1562 on: January 29, 2018, 12:55:29 AM
:2funny: :2funny:  Val, I think we might include Stoney as the third PB member in the 'deranged sense of humour' category, along with you and me! still chuckling... :2funny: :2funny:

Of course!  I've never pretended otherwise!  :D

It's all my US Navy training........ (whistling)


stoney

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Reply #1563 on: January 29, 2018, 01:08:05 AM
A bit of excitement aboard old PJ this morning.

Lloyd has never really reacted badly to bug bites or bee stings....until today. He leaned back against the saloon cushion unaware there was a bee there escaping the rain. It stung him twice around the shoulder blade and within a few minutes he went into anaphylactic shock. He was totally unresponsive and I immediately went for the epipens. I injected him, got him in the recovery position and started monitoring his breathing, blood pressure, and pulse rate. He came round quickly and I got him talking to me but his vitals were way out of whack. After about an hour his BP started coming back up, pulse rate was dropping back down, thank goodness, breathing normally, and getting some colour back in his face. It has now been four hours and he is sitting up and feeling weakened but much better. I'll have to keep watch and keep monitoring him for 72hrs. to be sure he doesn't relapse. There is no doctor in town here, just a tiny pharmacy. He has no recollection of what happened... I just told him he'd have to do better than that to get clear of me that easily! lol

It is amazing how one's training comes back to you in times of crisis. Scary though, I thought at one point I might lose him. Another episode for the book Patricia.  ;)

Good thing you had the training and the equipment at hand.

BTW, something many people aren't aware of.  And that's full body electrical paralyzation via both hands on a freak circuit doesn't have to leave burns-and I didn't even get to the elongated light bulb in the boiler sight glass I was going to replace.

It felt like a large white hot bar of steel was being shoved through my chest.  The black dot in the center of my vision (like an old tube TV set after you turned it off) was expanding and I was fighting black out.

The ship rolled and the current dropped which gave me my legs back (which was on full emergency).  I slammed into the bulkhead a couple feet behind me with my boots 4-5 feet off the ground. 

I had gone down there right after lunch.  My legs absorbed the shock on the deck plates and I climbed the ladder out of the boiler room.  The ship rolled and I stumbled and hit the bulkhead (it hurt to breathe).  Then I heard over the 1MC (ship's P.A. system); "Dinner for the Crew".


linley.plester

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Reply #1564 on: January 29, 2018, 02:33:14 AM
All I can say Stoney is, that with so many narrow escapes, you must have been meant to be hung! You seem to have more lives than the proverbial cat!


nolan

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Reply #1565 on: January 29, 2018, 06:57:32 AM
Wowza :eek:

Glad you were around to save the day :twothumbs: :congrats: :cloud9:


Val

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Reply #1566 on: January 29, 2018, 05:59:38 PM
So am I Nolan, scary time. Should it ever happen again, you can rest assured I will be ready. Stopped the antihistamines yesterday and he's raring to go!  :doh:     ;)     ;D


Val

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Reply #1567 on: January 29, 2018, 06:11:31 PM
Linley, ...... Stoney .....   :drunk:       :drink2drop:    One can only imagine!   :faint:       :2funny:


stoney

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Reply #1568 on: January 29, 2018, 06:44:45 PM
Well done, Val!!!!! Sharon, bees turn up in the darned places. I had a hive settle in a tree outside my flat and despite closed doors and windows they were always getting into the flat. After treading on them a few times, I learned to wear shoes indoors, and eventually persuaded a bee keeper to move them for me. They must have been a more aggressive type than usual because he received 30 stings in the process. I've also seen them sitting on toilet seats at picnic grounds. Beeware!!!

But then Australia 'ups the ante' with all the poisonous snakes and spiders as well as the tiny marine animals, some transparent, that await you.  I've read the Huntsman Spider causes a lot of road accidents when they drop from the car's sun visor.


stoney

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Reply #1569 on: January 29, 2018, 07:27:36 PM
All I can say Stoney is, that with so many narrow escapes, you must have been meant to be hung! You seem to have more lives than the proverbial cat!

(Meow)  :D

Oh, there's much more. 

You see, I thought it was a case of my legs recovering like you jumped off something.  I regained consciousnes half-way to my feet.  I had to have hit the deck like a pile of rags and was unconscious by myself for four hours.


The US uses 110 VAC at 60 Hz..  The Hz. is close to the heart beat and, with that, muscles contract.  The UK uses 220 VAC at 50 Hz.  I'm told that Hz. has the tendency to expand the muscles getting you away.  And, yes, it really Hz.  (The joke demanded to be typed).

You do feel it and you're fully aware.  Every second.  However, you can't even scream.  Your whole body is short-circuited.  There was no safety violation.

Armored cable with it's woven strands is used in high temperature and pressure areas to protect the wires.  No one likes them as they're so blasted dangerous.

A boiler sight glass is similar to a contractor's bubble level.  Flip it vertical and expand the area between the lines and add a metal shield around the 5 inch long light bulb with a slit through it to let light through.  It tells a person whether the amount of water in the boiler is correct or too high or low.

The shield slides onto a base maybe 3/16ths of an inch and is held on with four screws.  There's no reason to turn off power as you're only changing the light bulb.  So, a hook holds the assembly in place.  You hold the assembly on a finger and visually inspect the woven armored cable as far as you can.

So, you grab the base tight in one hand and keep your elbow against your side.  You don't want the wires inside to move.  Undo the four screws and 'feather touch' the shield to wiggle it off the base.  WHAM.

The whole cable ended up being replaced.  Time and temperature had caused the wire insulation in a spot to fail.  It was probably further back where the cable curved under the boiler (there's slack in the runs)  The wires probably 'adjusted' to the change in the curve and the bare spot touched the armor.

Two weeks later I checked my weight as something was wrong.  I went from 167 LBS. to 139.  So, I vastly increased the amount I ate.  It hurt, a lot, just to breathe.  I won't describe the effort to lift the lid of my 'coffin locker'.

I'd be awake four hours and ready to sleep of twelve.  Won't happen.  Regular duty with a couple hours of lay down time.

A month later I went to the medic (no doctor on board) and demanded my medical records.  Things weren't better and I wanted to go to the hospital.  I waited a few hours as a Doc was coming on board and I would be the first patient.

He heard what happened checked me out.  Heart and lungs good.  He couldn't understand why I was still alive.  It should have burst my heart and boiled my brains.  He gave me some pills.

After a few days at sea I tossed them things over the side before they got me killed.

It stopped hurting to breathe some seven or eight weeks later.

Three months later I saw my girlfriend and she almost screamed.  My medium T-shirt hung on me like it was 'extra large'.

Six months later I went roller skating.  I lost my balance, did an arm 'windmill' and that bar of steel went through my chest again.  I was homeported in Norfolk, VA., and this was '77.  My USN contract was up late '78.

In early '85 I was USAF stationed in the California Mojave Desert (opposite end of the country).  Another guy's wife was taking basic medical classes at a Community College.  They use stories to break up lectures.  'Guess' which one she heard.

She told me that she went up to him after class and asked him; "Did this this this and this happen?" 

His eyes got big and (this is years later and on the other side of the country) and he asked her how she knew.  She told him I was now USAF tearing into fighter jet Communications and Navigation equipment at the local base.

She told me something I was unaware of.  The surprise wasn't that the accident happened.  It was that the victim survived.  It made the rounds, at least, at the major Navy hospital that was there.

My last 'escape' (medical) was in '94 and I'm quite content with that.  However, there's no telling how much asbestos is in my lungs from my Navy time.  Three days before I got out a team (in full suits and environmental air packs) sealed off the after boiler room to begin the removal of asbestos. 

There's no way to tell if the asbestos will 'bloom'. The stuff killed a friend of mine and I'll leave it at that.


Happychappy

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Reply #1570 on: January 30, 2018, 12:40:12 AM
Wow, Val, I felt sick in the stomach just reading about Lloyd and the bee sting.  You are an absolute  :angel:  to have saved his life. What a terrifying situation to be in and yes, another interesting, albeit scary topic for your book. Thank the Lord that you had the wherewithal to take charge of the situation and that everything turned out O.K.   :flowers: :flowers: :flowers:  A whole bunch to you Val.


Patricia
Patricia
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Happychappy

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Reply #1571 on: January 30, 2018, 12:45:26 AM
Oh! Stoney, After reading of Val's scary situation with Lloyd and then your near misses with death, I am now going to bed because my nerves are shot.


Darned scary stuff but at least you are here to relate the incidents and as I said before, you should write a book as Val should too. 


Patricia
Patricia
Blessed are those who give without remembering and blessed are those who receive without forgetting - anonymous


Val

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Reply #1572 on: January 30, 2018, 02:21:10 PM
Patricia, I have heard it said more than once that sailing is 90% boredom, and 10% excruciating excitement. While that may be true for some.... I'm feeling I'm getting more than my share on the excitement  end!      

Hoping to find some quiet time, but we are once again (still) being smacked with rains and more heavier winds gusting to 40knots for the next few days. So we'll be staying aboard and keeping watch on some of the newer boats that have come in to hide from the onslaught. Just really not interested in participating in any 'drag races' !  :tongue:


stoney

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Reply #1573 on: January 30, 2018, 03:13:36 PM
Oh! Stoney, After reading of Val's scary situation with Lloyd and then your near misses with death, I am now going to bed because my nerves are shot.




Darned scary stuff but at least you are here to relate the incidents and as I said before, you should write a book as Val should too. 


Patricia

Wasn't intending on affecting your nerves.  The intention's more along the lines of opening a window into what's a quite alien world for most people.

Oh, here's a US Government photo of the ship.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 03:20:25 PM by stoney »


stoney

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Reply #1574 on: January 30, 2018, 03:28:35 PM
Patricia, I have heard it said more than once that sailing is 90% boredom, and 10% excruciating excitement. While that may be true for some.... I'm feeling I'm getting more than my share on the excitement  end!      

Hoping to find some quiet time, but we are once again (still) being smacked with rains and more heavier winds gusting to 40knots for the next few days. So we'll be staying aboard and keeping watch on some of the newer boats that have come in to hide from the onslaught. Just really not interested in participating in any 'drag races' !  :tongue:


Can't argue about the percentages, but terminal lack of sleep should factor in somewhere for the voyage duration.

You're right.  When things get 'exciting' that means something's gone wrong (and there's a lot to go wrong on a warship).  Minor wrongs are one thing, they can be dealt with later.  We were never able to find the proverbial 8-ball that we were behind.  Might have, if we would have had the Hubble.  ;)