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Author Topic: How Do You Sort Your Box?  (Read 735 times)

Val

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on: October 03, 2017, 01:44:50 PM
 :confused:   A query for all you pastelists out there.

I have been researching how to set up your palette in your pastel box. It seems to come down to two main options. One, is to lay it out based on colour (much like the colour wheel).  The second, is to lay it out based on value. Which would be darks, mid tones, and lights.

Is one preferential over the other? Benefits?

I also understand the old adage of "whatever works best for you", but as a newcomer to the world of pastel trying to sort out the myriad of colours, shade, and tints, it's all a bit daunting.

So.... what method do you use, how do you set up your box?


Happychappy

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Reply #1 on: October 06, 2017, 12:51:56 AM
Crumbs Val, I use my pencil pastels and sticks as they come packed in the box or tin.  I have never thought of arranging them in any order because a lot of Pastel tutors, using the pencils, which I use almost exclusively too, refer to the numbers to be used and not the colours or anything else.  Just shows you, we learn every day.  Anyway, I will be watching closely to see what the other pastelists do. Thanks for posting this interesting question.


Patricia
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Annie.

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Reply #2 on: October 06, 2017, 02:41:37 AM
I don't do pastel painting but looked at Dennis video and what I thought was an impressive collection of pastels.  I assume the idea is the same for any media using colors (even with only 10 tubes of paint).

I can picture the colour wheel now and this how I arrange my paints and pencils.  That. Seems logical to me.

But I hear Dennis vouce in my head saying "colour is not so important, having the correct tonal value is what makes a great painting"... so tonal arrangement may be the key to a great painting.

Now if only I could see tonal values between differeny hues  :-\
I still have to use the balck and white photocopy machine... and I am routinely surprised as how far off I am... yes, I know, practice, practice, and more practice.


Val

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Reply #3 on: October 06, 2017, 03:20:06 AM
I think at this point I'm just going to try and organize them by colour. It may take a month or more  :crazy2: but I figure sooner or later I'll end up with some semblance of order!  :D I'm sure I'll get to know them as I use them and can rearrange them as necessary. I think that will be my job tomorrow, to start setting up my box so I'm ready to rock and roll!  :heeha: I will be using the cheaper pastels I have for practicing and doing lessons.

I also use my pencils from the tins they came in.
 
I learned something new today....I can paint sheep!


Val

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Reply #4 on: October 06, 2017, 03:23:26 AM
You are right on that Annie, value is key. I have trouble sorting value when looking at colours. That will be something that comes with time. I just know when it 'feels' right!  ;D


Annie.

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Reply #5 on: October 06, 2017, 12:44:28 PM
Maybe you should keep your cheap pastels from your good ones... I would gringe at the idea of mixing student and prof oils in a good painting.  :-\


Val

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Reply #6 on: October 06, 2017, 03:25:49 PM
My Staedtler pastels are regarded as 'Studio Quality', not sure exactly what that means, but they are the ones I used for my frog. The colours are lovely and bright, and creamy smooth to lay down. But I will keep them separate in their own box. O0


Annie.

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Reply #7 on: October 06, 2017, 06:46:16 PM
 O0


lynn p.

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Reply #8 on: October 25, 2017, 02:27:31 AM
Val, I just saw this post.  I read Maggie Price's article (she is now deceased but article is probably still on web, I'll see if I can find it) who sorts by value.  I tried that but then I found that I was hunting too much although it made sense.  I think if I was an abstract painter or one of the modernist painters who doesn't attend to color much it would be perfect.  I finally settled on sorting by color and value, dark greens to light for example within same section.  If I have room I separate by cool and warm.  I will say that the super softies should not go in a box as they crumble easily and rub off on every other stick.  I keep Roche, Ludwig, Great American,  Sennelier and Schminke's out of my travel box as I have crushed too many of them and then had to clean the whole box. I keep mount vision, grumbachers, diane townsends, Rembrandts, unisons etc. in my box.  Also, if you have a great, expensive set it is good to clean each pastel after use and put back in their little foam, cushy, spot. This sorting thing is a real puzzle though.  Eventually I think I will get a second box for portrait pastels and use my first for landscape as I am carting around stuff I don't often use when doing portraits.  Also, Alan Flattman, who is teaching our plein air class believes you should only have 60-90 half sticks for plein air arranged by color and value so than you aren't caring much around so I have a set of Great Americans just for plein air.  This is an EXPENSIVE hobby :D :D


lynn p.

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Reply #9 on: October 25, 2017, 03:17:45 AM

Val, here is Maggie Price's article.  Her arrangement is slightly different than I recall and I may try again.
http://paintingpartners.blogspot.com/2010/11/value-of-organization.html


Val

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Reply #10 on: October 25, 2017, 03:06:32 PM
Ta much for the link Lynn, I'll go have a read while I wait for the clouds to stop crying!  ;)


Val

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Reply #11 on: October 25, 2017, 04:25:03 PM
Interesting read. I did try sorting by value, but ended up in a right muck!  :D So spending more time with my colour wheel and finally getting a better sense about it. So easy to confuse yourself with so many different opinions!  :crazy2:

Dark to light by colour is what I am going to start with, then deal with the values in each family. It just makes more sense to me, to say I need a yellow for this flower, and go to that group and pick out the value accordingly. Makes keeping the colours clean much easier as well.  ^-^
Will have to try it and see how it works out.  :painting:


Cath

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Reply #12 on: December 28, 2017, 08:22:52 PM
This thread has only just caught my attention and it sure has my thinking cogs working.  :detective: :think:
Like Patricia, my pastels have always just been kept in the container and allocated places they were in, at the time of purchase.               
Thus,  the different grades of softness or hardness are also separated.
Cathy


Val

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Reply #13 on: December 29, 2017, 07:12:10 PM
I love to be able to take my box ashore (like my w/c paintbox) and try to paint what I see. I like to have a bit of the hard, semi hard, soft, and extra soft pastels available with me. By using the hard pastels to block in my lights and darks, I don't overload the paper too early and am able to put multiple layers on top if needed to gain the desired effect. By grouping the colours in their families, I have everything where I need it and I am finding it much easier to to pick out what I need. Obviously I can't carry all of the boxes of various varieties, so I have to learn which pastels I use most, and adjust my box accordingly as I go. I still have a very long journey ahead of me with pastels, but it is well worth the effort to learn.... and I am having an absolute riot on the way!  :yippee:

Sadly I haven't met anyone down here as yet that uses pastels. But I am certain I will convert somebody one of these days!  ^-^     ;D


Cath

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Reply #14 on: December 29, 2017, 10:33:02 PM
Ah, hence the danger or skinny-dipping in a sea of disolving pastels!   ;) :2funny:  (other thread)

Jokes aside,  not having started the PB pastels journey, yet, it will be an advantage to learn from your experiences when the time comes.   :)
Cathy