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Author Topic: Dundee, Michigan Old Mill  (Read 8722 times)

patindaytona

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on: July 08, 2018, 04:07:55 PM
Painted from a photograph I had taken years ago. It's a small town about 20min. away from my home town in Michigan. I've been there hundreds of times. I went over...........things again and again, but it's ok. I could see the contrasts weren't right repeatedly and some "lines" were either too strong or not strong enough........repeat repeat...too much, but it's ok. Of course, i see things still.............put it away. NOT that important.   
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #1 on: July 08, 2018, 11:33:34 PM
 :) This is SO beautiful, Pat!  I love the fall colors and the work you’ve put into this painting!  Makes me feel like visiting this place, too! ~Liz


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: July 09, 2018, 12:51:19 AM
Thanks Liz. Whenever I photograph my paintings (i use a radio tranmitted bounced flash shooting in corner of the room towards ceiling to soften the light alot), it STILL ends up not quite right. Sometimes values or colors seem less prominent in the photo. I have to fix them to look like the painting. I do't want to overdo it and make it look alot better, or..........worse. But, this is fairly close and really so what. I'm honest and did the best i could no matter what the case is.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


EmmaLee

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Reply #3 on: July 10, 2018, 12:51:02 PM
Great job, Pat. I love the sunlight in this scene.
EmmaLee


patindaytona

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Reply #4 on: July 10, 2018, 10:50:44 PM
Thanks alot Emma!!! :thankyou:
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #5 on: July 11, 2018, 01:04:34 AM
Great job Pat.  O0   Love the light on the tree tops, chimney and taller building in background. Nice reflections in the river. Well done.  :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

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patindaytona

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Reply #6 on: July 11, 2018, 10:37:12 AM
Hi and thanks Val. I admit that it's one of my best ones i think. I fussed forever, but then I'm thinking of people who paint the heads of needles etc you can see a complete painting under a microscope. So, it's all not that bad i suppose what i do.  It's just that you loose sight of the big picture. Another thing I've noticed is that the longer you look at a painting your doing, the more it looks cartoonish......because so many tones are missing compared with a actual photograph. It looks more and more like that and you start "filling in"to avoid what you're seeing. That's another reason why it's tempting to keep fussing with things. You can drown in it!
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.