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Author Topic: Fern  (Read 4543 times)

patindaytona

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on: July 23, 2018, 06:28:43 PM
The fourth one i've done of this particular image.  Even as i speak! I'm being particular here....i changed it many many times and it doesn't mean i left it alone at the stage i wish i could have, but have no choice........i just did when i saw it quite possibly could get bad once again on me. OVER ABSORPTION of the mind by looking way way too long! Also, like i said before when photographing a paintings, it's never going to be a perfect representation...could be slightly better OR worse than the actual.   Yes, even as i speak.......same as painting.  All in all, so what! Not that important.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #1 on: July 26, 2018, 02:13:35 AM
I could have used this as a guideline when I did my frog painting (pastel). I can see where adding a bit of a .... teal green/blue colour in the leaf would help with dimension. I ended up scrubbing off the background behind. I'll have another go at it once we get the moving over with.
Good go Pat, and thanks for giving me some ideas on how to fix my painting!  :heeha:    :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: July 26, 2018, 06:36:51 PM
Val, i was thinking today on how when you see photographs, you can really pump up the color on them and yet still maintain the look of being natural. But in real life most of the time it's not nearly that saturated. I was painting yesterday from a photo i have and the photo looks completely natural, but if i painted that sky it would be way way too saturated. A painting has to really stick to it's natural color in real life.I was very tempted to paint the sky as i saw it because it did look ok as it was, but it wouldn't work in paint.I went thru about 40 paintings yesterday i have and touched up every single one (for the millionth time).   I improved ALL.  I realize now that in painting, unlike a photograph, you have to have a focal point and all else has to become subdued....weather it be that some area(s) compete with some contrast, or maybe over saturated.  I pushed those things all down and now the focal points all tend to have become much more attractive with no divisions or competition. It really works!
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #3 on: July 27, 2018, 09:34:56 PM
 :yippee: Don't you just love it when things just fall into place?  I remember if I couldn't figure something out at school, he would say, "Never mind, you're just waiting for the nut to drop!" Well all I can say is that nut is in one heck of a tall tree.... it's taking a heck of a long time to drop!  :2funny:
Good on you Pat, that little tidbit will make your paintings that much easier.  O0
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet