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Author Topic: Work to be proud of  (Read 2885 times)

liz

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on: September 13, 2018, 07:51:41 PM


I may have mentioned that I started volunteering with an art group at a rehab hospital 4 weeks ago.  A dozen or more folks, young and old, come for their ‘therapy’ once or twice a week.  The majority use art simply as therapy and do their own thing; but a few have discovered an interest in art and know what they want to paint and attempt to do so.  Volunteers set up table easels and prepare basic acrylic or oil paint palettes for them and set up what they need.


Interestingly, the elderly, especially, seem to feel invincible and choose ‘difficult’ compositions because they just like a particular picture.  An 84 year old, recovering from a stroke as many of this group are, started her painting three weeks ago and ‘recruited’ me to be her mentor.  She had many questions and needed a lot of support for her then ‘muddied up’ painting efforts on a large canvas.  That’s the other thing about the 12-15 outpatients.  Some ask for large canvases that even I don’t paint on anymore- 16x20, 18x24.  It seems that bigger means more impressive!?  The art class is about building self esteem, after all...

From a dry looking, muddied up, blurry oil painting where my patient ‘scrubbed’ her paint on with a dry brush, as you can see, the end result was remarkable.  She was an eager learner as we worked on composition:  form and values of the pomegranates, color mixing, applying brush strokes with sufficient paint, perspective and background sky colors, sky holes between foliage, etc., etc.  She was so proud of her final work (and so was I), that she let me share her painting.  The hospital is very strict about their ‘no photos’ of any patients, in or outpatients. 

Another person I’m ‘helping’ is a 91 year old who is doing a floral painting, an acrylic on 11x14.  Her first drawing was very small in the center of the canvas.  We talked about what part was most important (focal point as we know it) and so we worked on her sketch, simplifying her composition and measuring visually and with my hands where to possibly place shapes, etc.

It is my first experience exploring art for myself, too, with these folks.  This is a unique group that is not being ‘taught’ art skills, just exploring art for themselves as therapy and making friends while getting healthy again.  Well, art IS therapy for many of us and along the way we do pick up some art skills and color theory.  ~Liz




MaryAnne Long

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Reply #1 on: September 13, 2018, 07:56:20 PM
Wow, Liz, she did well, considering her initial efforts.

Yes, working with seniors is so inspiring.

aloha

mea
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nolan

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Reply #2 on: September 13, 2018, 08:27:54 PM
fabulous and inspirational :yippee: :yippee: :yippee:


Val

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Reply #3 on: September 20, 2018, 10:32:10 PM
WOW!  :heeha:   That is amazing! I can't wait to be 84... then I can paint like that!    :yippee:      :2funny:     Way to go Ethel!!!  :cheering: :cheering: :cheering:
Nail on the head Nolan,  Inspirational.   O0
Cheers, Val

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dennis

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Reply #4 on: September 21, 2018, 06:52:13 AM
 :clap: :clap: :flowers:
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liz

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Reply #5 on: September 22, 2018, 08:35:25 AM
 :)  Thanks for your comments about Ethel.  She really is a survivor and inspiration.  An old gentleman in the group says he will be her agent.  Both are widows and share the same table each week.  And would you believe- I saw Ethel pull out of the hospital lot with a snazzy late model black Honda Civic, too.  Way to go, huh?!


VAL, crank up your art work now or Ethel will leave us in the dust!


~Liz


Val

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Reply #6 on: September 22, 2018, 09:21:53 AM
I have no doubt that Ethel could do just that!  I'll do my best to catch up once we're settled...  :run:       :painting:         :tooth:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: November 05, 2018, 04:12:29 PM
Thanks a nice painting Liz! Warms foreward, cools receding. Main thing is it's clean and not muddy or overworked. Nice colors.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #8 on: November 12, 2018, 07:56:27 PM
 :) HI PAT!
Isn’t it AMAZING that this little gal in her 80’s just started painting after a stroke and can produce this kind of work?  She is eager to learn about color mixing and basic techniques of paint handling and off she goes!  Actually when I first met her with the beginnings of the painting it was scuffed up and muddied looking, but oil paint being so forgiving allowed applying paint layers and more paint on her brush did the trick!  Also filling in ‘sky holes’ as Nolan taught us helped her composition immensely.


Thanks for your comments! ~Liz


stoney

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Reply #9 on: November 27, 2018, 11:36:24 PM


I may have mentioned that I started volunteering with an art group at a rehab hospital 4 weeks ago.  A dozen or more folks, young and old, come for their ‘therapy’ once or twice a week.  The majority use art simply as therapy and do their own thing; but a few have discovered an interest in art and know what they want to paint and attempt to do so.  Volunteers set up table easels and prepare basic acrylic or oil paint palettes for them and set up what they need.


Interestingly, the elderly, especially, seem to feel invincible and choose ‘difficult’ compositions because they just like a particular picture. 


I can't help but chuckle a bit here.  The above was where I started.  It wasn't 'invincibility' that caused me to choose a 'difficult' composition to work on.  It was because I didn't know enough to realize the particular source picture was a difficult one.



An 84 year old, recovering from a stroke as many of this group are, started her painting three weeks ago and ‘recruited’ me to be her mentor.  She had many questions and needed a lot of support for her then ‘muddied up’ painting efforts on a large canvas.  That’s the other thing about the 12-15 outpatients.  Some ask for large canvases that even I don’t paint on anymore- 16x20, 18x24.  It seems that bigger means more impressive!?  The art class is about building self esteem, after all...[/font]

From a dry looking, muddied up, blurry oil painting where my patient ‘scrubbed’ her paint on with a dry brush, as you can see, the end result was remarkable.  She was an eager learner as we worked on composition:  form and values of the pomegranates, color mixing, applying brush strokes with sufficient paint, perspective and background sky colors, sky holes between foliage, etc., etc.  She was so proud of her final work (and so was I), that she let me share her painting.  The hospital is very strict about their ‘no photos’ of any patients, in or outpatients. 

Another person I’m ‘helping’ is a 91 year old who is doing a floral painting, an acrylic on 11x14.  Her first drawing was very small in the center of the canvas.  We talked about what part was most important (focal point as we know it) and so we worked on her sketch, simplifying her composition and measuring visually and with my hands where to possibly place shapes, etc.

It is my first experience exploring art for myself, too, with these folks.  This is a unique group that is not being ‘taught’ art skills, just exploring art for themselves as therapy and making friends while getting healthy again.  Well, art IS therapy for many of us and along the way we do pick up some art skills and color theory.  ~Liz


The teacher teaches the student while learning from the student as well.  All I've learned has been, with the exception of a couple of classes, been informal.  Much is learned through play.  :)
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


Annie.

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Reply #10 on: April 10, 2019, 10:53:08 PM
  :clap: :clap: :clap:  to Ethel!

And all my admiration to you Liz, what you do is important and highly valuable to those post-stroke.  I am certain that they appreciate the time, and expertise, you give them   :flowers: :flowers: :flowers:


njnjgirl

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Reply #11 on: April 11, 2019, 12:46:50 PM
You and Ethel are inspiring.  I love art for how it touches people.  I admire you Liz, you have such a beautiful giving spirit. :flowers:
Mary Lou

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