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Author Topic: Two Drawings  (Read 2397 times)

patindaytona

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on: November 22, 2018, 06:51:04 PM
The landscape one (from one of my reference photos taken in California 1985) and other of old spanish mission i've been to in New Mexico.The landscape: When you are aware that the drawing you're working on will be seen by someone, you automatically try to adjust it to their needs. That drawing must be perfect! And because you post every drawing, you're not even allowed to make a mistake—ever. UNquote.At least i didn't post these two on facebook, but you're all artist's here so it's ok.  Another quote: If you can see your picture's going wrong, stop. No matter how much time you've already invested into the creation of this piece, there's still some time you can save if you stop now. It often takes less effort to create something anew than to fix it over and over. (which i didn't do because i messed with the landscape for 8 hours when it just wasnt' going to improve at all (the main trees in foreground...5 hours and i was no longer looking at my reference photo....completely off. I have GOT TO not care so much and leave a drawing and start a new one instead. (landscape was all charcoal and mission was pencil except for the sky). I just bought large pad of charcoal paper...the most expensive too and it's not as smooth as i like and not nearly white enough either darn it. Going to buy another pad :whistle:

« Last Edit: November 22, 2018, 06:53:16 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Happychappy

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Reply #1 on: November 23, 2018, 12:43:54 AM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:  Both outstanding pieces Pat.  You are such a good artist. I particularly love the bottom one with its brilliant values which gives the scene such character and interest, something which I still strive to accomplish as I was always afraid of going too dark. Dennis and Nolan kept on drumming into me to "go darker" and while I am much better, there is still room for improvement.


Patricia
Patricia
Blessed are those who give without remembering and blessed are those who receive without forgetting - anonymous


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: November 23, 2018, 03:13:54 PM
Hi Patricia,thanks. oh yea, darks are a very good think in drawing because few people (who are not artists) realize that pencils come in darker grades than your typical no.2 they're used too all their lives. So, that rich black really stands out well. Won't complain much here, but as always i went over things that annoyed me so much forever and all that causes is more frustration. With drawing you have to go super super slow. That's why i had those problems with it. Their will always be tweaking things i know, but the less, the better if you get things more correct from the very start. And the next one i do will be that way. It's a waterfall taken in Jamaica when i went. I need to just relax a while before i even start. Their are alot of areas in it that throw the eye off of where you are looking, so in photoshop, i created a black layer with a cut out window in it so i just move it around to where the small area i'm working on is at the time and won't have to strain all the time to find where i'm at.Not getting ahead of myself on that one!
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #3 on: December 02, 2018, 05:53:45 PM
Hi Pat,
You're doing some very difficult compositions with pencil and chalk! I recall us talking about why we do art many times, and I think much of your stressing is what I see as the reason why I draw and paint.  In my mind I always know that I paint for myself. I wrote about this on my blog site http://artwithaloha.wordpress.com


You have strong feelings because art is so personal.  That is a given.  To be clearer, I draw and paint for myself, for my own satisfaction or joy, or even 'therapy'.  If anyone sees my work, it's not all that important to me what they may think or say because what's important is how I felt about my work.  The art experience or process was meaningful even more than the actual results of my efforts.  Anyway, that's how I feel about anything I do.  Art teaches me a lot about patience and persevering, always challenging myself to forge forward to the discoveries that can be made with art medium.  Stay strong,  :flowers: -Liz


nolan

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Reply #4 on: December 02, 2018, 07:25:05 PM
very nice drawings :clap: :clap: :clap:


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: December 03, 2018, 03:03:43 PM
Liz, it doesn't matter what you say about it..haha, just kidding.i know what you are saying very well Liz, but saying and doing are two different things. I know......i should be doing it as relaxing and only for myself, but..........it's just not going to happen that way for me.I did post on facebook again, and....i've always gotten one or two likes thru my wife and/or her friends.........so forget that. I posted and decided, why? I just deleted them from there and it was a good idea in my favor i believe for doing that.Uh hem....yea, so i'm posting on here. But you're all in the same boat and all artists here with same interests in it...that's different.I'll check out your link today sometime Liz...You think i'm doing too difficult of subjects liz?? I'm thought on those terms before, but i don't think so really too much. Especially with drawing, i find i can correct easier than with paint. YOu know me too...i like to refine over and over and over and i can do that with as SHARP POINT of a pencil..i'm super critical this way and that's "me".
Hello and thanks much Nolan, I appreciate your comment. You ARE the artist here! You KNOW...................that's all i can say.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #6 on: December 04, 2018, 07:11:29 PM
 :) Hi Pat!  A lot has been written about simplifying a composition to emphasize where the focus area or focus point is going to be in a drawing/painting.  When I look at most of my work there is a central theme, story or mood that I try to create.  So the question is how much or how little is needed to accomplish my purpose and how to avoid elements that will compete with each other in the composition.  Actually I think I have simple compositions because my drawing skills are quite limited.


Some accomplished artists and teachers go to great lengths in the preparation of their art pieces and it shows in their work.  Whether hyper-realism or realistic Impressionism they do some or most of the following: notans,thumb nail sketches, tonal painting in a mid tone (canvas preparation with a ground and underpainting), before blocking in dark and light areas and continuing on, redrawing/sketching as they go, etc.  Perhaps if we did more thinking and preparation we may be more satisfied with our art work. Problem is that sometimes we’re not satisfied after we’re ‘done’ and we begin to think about what we did or didn’t do and our/my painting goes through a ‘makeover’!   I still remember my waterfall painting which I should have left alone,  but I fixed the rocks up too much until they turned into boulders.  So I worked on them some more until they turned back into rocks.  When I looked at my original  painting ( I take photos of stages), the rough rocks looked better than the rocks in the final painting! ::) :'(

« Last Edit: December 04, 2018, 07:25:37 PM by liz »


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: December 05, 2018, 01:40:41 AM
Liz, i've tried alot of preperation before many times before starting a painting. What can i say.............makes me cringe to thing how i spoiled a good one after that added carefulness before getting it off the ground.
I try to be very careful when beginning things because i tell myself, THIS will be a good one...you have to get yourself in the mood and feel that way.But even with a very careful outline, i know and i'm sure you know that it can end up being "off". I just did that again with my waterfall drawing.
One very common reason i see is it's because we end up not looking anymore at the actual reference. I start thinking, well i can see for myself that a little bit of tone here will BALANCE things....like you said, the rocks become bigger over time with each little nudge one at a time. Before you know it, they look always like what the brain wants............perfection and it's not organic one bit anymore. The brain always avoids that kind of thing.   They end up looking like watermelons, or pumpkins.
I spent nearly 7 hour non stop yesterday desperately trying to fix my DONE drawing. (it's not bad at all now, but i was taking a big risk messing that long with it).What i did that helped alot...........after all that time and took me less than half hour to correct it pretty much was..............i forced myself to look at the reference again.
You become so so paralyzed when fussing so long that you can't move ...not for a second to go look at the reference (computer screen).
I made myself thinking wont' make one bit of difference.....i SAW the rock was way way cut short, their were three or so mini water falls i obliterated...etc. MAJOR elements.I quickly put them in even though not great.....but they were major PLAYERS, and just the suggestion of them improved it so much.WHY? Because like anatomy,  they made sense. The mini water falls trickled down to the biggest water fall. Without them, it didn't make "visual sense".OK, hope this all helps.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #8 on: January 11, 2019, 03:32:50 PM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: January 16, 2019, 06:15:22 PM
Hi and thanks Val.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.