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Author Topic: Making and Storing Canvasses  (Read 6681 times)

GPeachy

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on: April 15, 2019, 02:18:29 PM
Hi there. I was not sure where to post these questions at so here goes, if there is a more appropriate topic matter, please let me know.

I have a bolt of primed canvas that I bought from https://www.bigduckcanvas.com for making my own panels and stretcher bars. With the panels, I would like a recommendation on the proper type of adhesive to use? There are lots of "How Too's" on the web and I am getting controversial opinions.

And then secondly, I will be having to move and I am not sure if I will need to store my paintings, if I do need to store them, how should I go about doing this and should it be in climate controlled or not?  How should they be packaged, etc?

Nolan, on the panels that you paint on, are they canvas over the panel or primer over the panel?  I tried painting on a white panel without a weave finish and the paint seems to smear around. The panels that I ordered where a smooth hard finish so I may not be working with the best type.

Thanks for any help.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 02:57:53 PM by GPeachy »
Ginger


nolan

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Reply #1 on: April 15, 2019, 10:44:15 PM
A few questions in one so lets answer then one at a time:
1) What adhesive to use when stretching your own canvassesyou stretch the canvas over the frame and then staple it into place.
2) Storing paintingsGet yourself some cardboard sheets and bubble wrap (you can even buy the cardboard with the bubble wrap attached already) from the hardware store or moving company. You then wrap the painting in this cardboard with the bubble wrap on the inside. Stick it all together using packaging tape.

If you have many artworks to store then wrap multiple in the same batch. Separate each artwork with layers of the bubble wrap.This is the method that they used to transport my artworks from South Africa to New Zealand and many are still in these "packages". They fashioned them in such a way that the top has a flap so I slide the paintings in and out of the "package" as I need / rotate them with other artworks in the house. Not a single artwork has gotten any damage or mildew (we live at the sea and the packages were even stored in the garage for a few years) over the years in these "packages"
3) What canvasses I useI always paint on either the store bought canvas panels or store bought box canvasses. All have pre-primed medium weave canvas on them.
If your canvasses are too smooth then the paint will tend to slide on the support. What you can do is gesso the support roighly adding lots of textured brush strokes or you can lightly sand the gesso with a rough sandpaper to give it more tooth for the paint to grip on. O0


GPeachy

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Reply #2 on: April 15, 2019, 11:32:05 PM
Great information, thank you. I actually have stretched my own canvas onto many stretcher bars, I have found that I like the thin-ness of panels for framing sake as I will be doing this for many of my paintings as well.  I will look for the canvas panels. I have actually been gluing canvas onto the panels and rolling out with a giant rolling pin.. :2funny:

 

Ginger


Val

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Reply #3 on: May 04, 2019, 11:46:40 PM
When I have glued any of my papers to backing boards... I use a marble rolling pin.  ::)   It's always good to multi purpose!   ;D
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #4 on: May 05, 2019, 08:22:04 PM
a rolling pin would work well, then add a weight on top until dry O0