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Author Topic: How to make a transparent glaze  (Read 117 times)

Annie.

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Reply #15 on: September 20, 2019, 01:49:26 PM
Observation:  some pigments pool in the little indentation of the weaving of the canvas, even if perfectly mixed and even on the palette, making the glaze uneven.

Would glazing be easier if done on a wood panel instead?  Nolan's lesson was on canvas, but I believe some of the Renaissance artists used oil glazing technique on wood. 

Anyone did glazing on wood panel?    I never work on wood yet...


nolan

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Reply #16 on: September 22, 2019, 08:53:23 PM
it just the nature of the pigment. Some pigments dissolve in the oil and others don't.

In general the ones that dissolve are your transparent pigments which you ideally want to use for glazing.The ones that don't dissolve are your opaque pigments and are better to not use for glazing.

On the tube you can tell if the paint is transparent or opaque by looking for a circle or a square. If it is filled in the paint is opaque, if it is only an outline it is transparent and if it is half filled then the paint is semi-transparent.


Annie.

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Reply #17 on: September 23, 2019, 11:17:25 AM
Thank you for the explanation.