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Author Topic: How to make a transparent glaze  (Read 1768 times)

Annie.

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Reply #15 on: September 20, 2019, 01:49:26 PM
Observation:  some pigments pool in the little indentation of the weaving of the canvas, even if perfectly mixed and even on the palette, making the glaze uneven.

Would glazing be easier if done on a wood panel instead?  Nolan's lesson was on canvas, but I believe some of the Renaissance artists used oil glazing technique on wood. 

Anyone did glazing on wood panel?    I never work on wood yet...
Cheers, Annie
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.    ? Plato


nolan

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Reply #16 on: September 22, 2019, 08:53:23 PM
it just the nature of the pigment. Some pigments dissolve in the oil and others don't.

In general the ones that dissolve are your transparent pigments which you ideally want to use for glazing.The ones that don't dissolve are your opaque pigments and are better to not use for glazing.

On the tube you can tell if the paint is transparent or opaque by looking for a circle or a square. If it is filled in the paint is opaque, if it is only an outline it is transparent and if it is half filled then the paint is semi-transparent.


Annie.

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Reply #17 on: September 23, 2019, 11:17:25 AM
Thank you for the explanation.
Cheers, Annie
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.    ? Plato


Trace

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Reply #18 on: January 30, 2021, 05:38:24 PM
Great post thanks Annie. Sorry to drop in, but I'm learning all about colours, oils & glazing atm. I get so confused as to the fat over lean principle and am finding sometimes that my colour adjustment isn't the right look after a glaze. Nolan when you commented previously to Annie ..."Give the glazing a go. It is a good learning experience. If you are not happy, then just paint over it normally. (It will go very quick because you already know what to paint where)"  wouldn't this mean that you are putting lean over fat? and does this contribute to the paint getting a crackle affect after it has dried?  :thankyou:
Tracey


Annie.

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Reply #19 on: February 09, 2021, 11:35:03 PM
TIP
A local artist told me to put just a little bit of white gesso in acrylic medium to make a glaze to 'push back' the background of a landscape.   Anyone has any comment about this?   I can see that it will work, but gesso over a painting???
Cheers, Annie
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.    ? Plato


Maryna

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Reply #20 on: February 13, 2021, 07:24:05 PM
I would never put gesso over an oil painting. I guess it should be ok over acrylic.
I know some canvasses get oil primed, not sure if that will work.
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Annie.

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Reply #21 on: April 07, 2021, 07:10:51 PM
My bad... I did not realized I was in the oil section.  Yes thinned gesso over acrylic not oil.
Cheers, Annie
We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.    ? Plato


 

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