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Author Topic: How to Paint Dogs Course  (Read 2182 times)

Happychappy

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Reply #135 on: February 12, 2020, 10:17:25 PM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:  Excellent Marie.     Patricia
Patricia
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TeresaM

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Reply #136 on: February 13, 2020, 08:23:52 AM
Excellent paintings Marie  :clap: :clap: :clap:
TeresaM
"It always seems impossible until it's done" Nelson Mandela


robynann

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Reply #137 on: February 13, 2020, 12:42:36 PM
Fabulous job Marie! I soooo want to take this course... How about a sale Nolan... LOL :2funny:
Art is when you hear a knocking from your soul...
and you answer.....


Rommie

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Reply #138 on: February 13, 2020, 09:31:24 PM

Hi All,
I understand Nolan is out but I'd like to post a question to the more seasoned oil painters.(That would be anyone who has actually completed an oil painting.)
Has anyone placed their artwork in the oven to speed drying time? I became impatient with the second layer of oil and baked it in the oven. It left the white of the canvas slightly scorched. I paint a thin layer over and you can still see the yellowish tinge. I liked how the painting was going but I'm not opposed to completely starting over. Any advice?
« Last Edit: February 14, 2020, 12:50:39 AM by Rommie »


EmmaLee

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Reply #139 on: February 14, 2020, 01:13:10 AM
I have never heard of using the oven to increase dry time. Oils dry by oxidation, not evaporation. I’m sorry I can’t give advice on what you can do to fix the damage. You might try layering opaque paint over the yellow areas until it’s hidden. Your dog looks really well done. You have done a great job!
EmmaLee


Rommie

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Reply #140 on: February 14, 2020, 05:15:10 PM
Thanks Emma Lee that's very kind! I did not know that about oil paint! I'm just wondering if the painting will crack if I paint on top of it. I have yet to finish a painting.
 I usually muck it up way before the second stage and toss it. You're avocado was lovely! The eycalyptus was brilliant as well!


EmmaLee

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Reply #141 on: February 14, 2020, 07:50:08 PM
Thank you so much, Rommie.

I’m sorry I can’t be more help. I have no idea if it will eventually crack or not. Hopefully not. Nolan would be the one to ask. Im sure he’ll have an answer for you when he returns.
I’m looking forward to seeing more of your artworks!
EmmaLee


Maryna

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Reply #142 on: February 15, 2020, 06:32:16 AM
Rommie, I have been painting in oils for many years. Putting it in the oven might not have been the best idea. ;)


Painting with oils is a waiting process. I suggest that you either do one of the following:
1. I mix linseed oil in my paints and I find that with most colors it does dry a little faster.
2.You could opt to mix in Liquin that will make the drying time speed up loads, it should be dry to the touch almost the next day.
3. You could paint something else while you wait for one painting to dry.


Your question about cracking if you paint over. It is critical that your top layer be thicker/more oil in than the previous layer. If you were to paint say a thin layer on top of a layer that is very thick the paint will crack! learned the hard way.


It is very important to be patient when creating art and also working in oils. Even though it is very forgiving and you have time to adjust your paints etc, drying does take time. The final result will be so much worth it in the end.


As the pug is part of the course paintings, I would perhaps suggest that you leave it now. This is great practice, you learned how to do the wrinkles and you also learned that paintings and ovens do not mix well.  ;D


Rommie - I removed your individual topic on the course as you did post it here too. Then we can keep all paintings and posts from the course in one place for easy access.  ;)
« Last Edit: February 15, 2020, 06:36:16 AM by Maryna »
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Rommie

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Reply #143 on: February 15, 2020, 04:53:17 PM
Hi Maryna,
Thank you your advice was very helpful. I'm having to reign in my patience :tickedoff:.That's probably why my paintings often meet a sad end. :2funny:
 I had a rather unfortunate experience with mediums.  I was under the impression that oil paint worked like watercolor and so I used turpentine to thin my oil paints to the consistency of watercolor. :help:
I finally came across one of Nolan's notes that said not to thin with solvent unless you use damar varnish, I believe.
I can't remember where I found it. I have been avoiding mediums ever since.I will definitely try the linseed oil.
Your cat and Yorkie made me want to try the lessons. Their spot on! But I really liked the camel in the Illusion of Movement challenge. It looks lovely in oil!
« Last Edit: February 15, 2020, 05:13:19 PM by Rommie »


Maryna

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Reply #144 on: February 15, 2020, 05:13:35 PM
Turps (household) is for cleaning brushes. Please don't use it as a medium. Your painting will not stand the time, it will start to flake off with age.
There is however a very specialised turps for artists. It is very expensive too.


Mediums like linseed oil or liquid is great. Don't 'water' it down too much. I found now with the fur that I thin it a little more than what I would when I paint the rest and using a good thin rigger brush works the charm.


Don't give up keep going.


I sometimes want to just put a paint knife through my work when it gets to that ugly phase, but I just hang in and keep going and then I surprise myself in the end.


Looking forward to the rest of your doggos.
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


charle

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Reply #145 on: February 17, 2020, 04:44:54 PM
I suggest Liquin as your medium for oils.  It dries much faster than linseed oil.  However, if you find you are in a hurry, paint your under painting with acrylics and then you can paint over with oils for the second layers.  Works very well this way.  By the way, I would start over oven heated oils are like putting your painting in the back window of the car.  Scary results. :gl:
Charle


Rommie

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Reply #146 on: February 17, 2020, 07:31:21 PM
Hi Charlie,
Thank you, I'll give the Liquin a try as well. i had an old bottle of Liquin I bought when I first Joined  Paintbasket but never got a chance to try it. When i pulled it out of the closet it was extremely dark and cloudy, so I chucked it. I was not sure if it was from storing it in a dark closet or the medium itself, so I was reluctant to try it.
I'll definitely give it another go! I particularly love the transparency of oil. They seem to have a slight glow to them. Your dog inspired me to keep going in the class. They're absolutely brilliant.
 I particularly like your  flowers on linen. I don't think you should stop at three. They are quite striking!


nolan

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Reply #147 on: February 18, 2020, 03:24:50 AM
Putting your oil painting in the oven is not a good idea, but I am sure you have seen that by now ;D

Everybody has already given you the correct advice regarding the medium to use, etc :yippee:

Your Pug is looking fabulous :yippee: :yippee: :yippee: I can't wait to see the rest of your course paintings :painting:

PS - every painting goes through an ugly stage. If you want to end up with anice painting you need to push through this stage instead of tossing the canvas in the bin O0


Rommie

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Reply #148 on: February 19, 2020, 03:55:29 PM
Thank you Nolan! Everyone was extremely helpful in your absence! :yippee: I wondered however, why you may apply heat to acrylics and not oils, assuming you figure in smoke point of the binder of course. This was actually the third painting I dried in the kitchen oven.I missed the timer. The other two came out dry and paint-able.
They simply didn't survive the ugly stage. Which was something about painting I'd never actualized; an ugly stage! I never realized how much planning goes into each stage of painting. I will add an ugly phase to the list. I must say that giving an offending painting the boot is somewhat cathartic. :fight: :yippee:


nolan

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Reply #149 on: February 19, 2020, 06:53:41 PM
you can use a hairdryer on acrylic as it is a water based paint so the hairdryer is helping to evaporate the water in the paint.

A little heat does in fact help oil paint dry. I always put my oil paintings in a sunny spot to dry. To much heat, like if you put it in the over, will however damage the painting in the same way as it being in a fire. Remember that the painting consists of more than just the paint, it also consists of linen or compressed paper which will degrade very quickly with excessive heat.