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Author Topic: Working fast  (Read 93 times)

Maryna

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on: March 03, 2020, 02:11:42 PM
This is a question to seasoned oil painters and Dennis or Nolan.


I have been following an artist on Facebook for quite some time. She finish her oil paintings in what I would say record times. This includes animals and pet portraits. So my question or perhaps confusion is how on earth does she manage to paint especially pet portraits so fast. How does she manage to layer hairs so well while it is still wet? Her work is exceptional and excellent. I have actually thought of sending her a message but feel too stupid to ask. Your insights into this?
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


charle

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Reply #1 on: March 03, 2020, 04:23:39 PM
I would send her a message.  I have formed some nice "friendships" with artists on FB.  I paint very slowly and am grateful to be retired so I can paint for hours at a time if I want, maybe she is painting hours and hours a day.  Love to know what you find out.
Charle


nolan

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Reply #2 on: March 03, 2020, 08:14:21 PM
I know who you are referring to Maryna.

Anet's work is awesome and she is a very prolific painter.

Her work is however not done as fast as you may think.

Most of her pet portraits are small canvasses (30cm x 40cm) which you can easily complete in a few hours. Especially after you have had the amount of practice that she has.

Her larger paintings take a few days to complete as would be expected.

She is a perfect role model for those wanting to do pet portrait commissions for a living or even just sell their artwork in general as she pretty much follows exactly what I teach in my course.

She has, over the years, built up a name for her pet portraits by using Facebook to promote them - she posts every artwork as it is completed and if she doesn't have a completed artwork, she posts a progress photo. If she doesn't have a progress photo either, then she will post something interesting art related.
This is posted to her personal page, her art page as well as the various art groups she belongs to. So if you belong to several of them as well, the chance that her posts / artworks will show up in your news feed is very high - increasing her visibility as you are constantly seeing her posts.

When she posts a commission, she clearly states that the artwork is a commission and is sold - social proof which brings in more work.

On the occasion when she does run out of commissioned work, she will do a painting of her choice, which is usually something fun / funny like her laughing zebra's which she knows will sell quickly. She will post progress photos as she goes, saying that the artwork will be available when complete. This drums up interest for the artwork and will often lead to it being sold before it has been completed.

If it hasn't sold by the time it is finished she will clearly state the price, size and her contact info along with the completed artwork pic, making it easy for somebody to get in touch to purchase the work.

Maryna - you are on the right track with what you are doing now, remember to see her as inspiration so you can strive to get to that point as well. When you are at that point too, others will then use YOU as inspiration O0 :painting: :painting: :painting:


EmmaLee

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Reply #3 on: March 04, 2020, 01:10:25 AM
Her artwork is beautiful and I admire any artist that can work quickly. I’m as slow as it gets. I just keep painting until it looks right and that can take a long time. I have been considering posting WIP photos to my social media just to keep interest, but I have a fear of starting a painting and then not being able to pull it off. That would embarrassing.  :sweat: 
EmmaLee


nolan

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Reply #4 on: March 04, 2020, 07:12:01 AM
We all have artworks that we attempt and don't get right. That is part of the growing process.
What you can do is not post your progress pics as you do that artworks, but delayed. For example you give yourself a week buffer before you start posting so what you painted last Monday you post today (Monday). What you painted last Tuesday, you will post tomorrow.

If you see you are running out of buffer, then break up your progress photos into smaller sections and post then over several days.

That not only gives you a buffer for in case you do an artwork you can't or don't want to share, but it also allows you to schedule your posts in advance so you are not running around wondering what to post today, you have a week or more planned out in advance and have plenty of time to fill any "gaps". O0


Maryna

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Reply #5 on: March 04, 2020, 10:54:08 AM
Some wonderful points there, thanks Nolan.
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


EmmaLee

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Reply #6 on: March 04, 2020, 12:45:54 PM
Great idea. Thank you Nolan
EmmaLee