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Author Topic: Pastel sticks as pencils?  (Read 360 times)

Maryna

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on: March 04, 2020, 02:08:26 PM
Dennis, I was just wondering, is there a way to use pastel sticks in a more realistic way as if you were using the pencils?
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


nolan

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Reply #1 on: March 04, 2020, 07:18:51 PM
In my experience getting a realistic effect is in the choice of colours. If your colours match you can paint / draw quite loose but the artwork will still look realistic.

If it is fine detail you are looking for then adding them using pastel pencils is a must as you are going to struggle to get that using the sticks.

You would need to keep sharpening them which wastes too much pastel and they are soft so the sharp edge / point disappears too quick.

The exception to this is if you are working on a very large scale when the thickness of the pastel stick gives you the impression of fine detail.


Val

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Reply #2 on: May 02, 2020, 05:48:31 PM
 :nosey:   Just spotted this and thought I´d stick my tuppence in.  :whistle:
I went back into my gallery and thought perhaps by giving you a few of the sizes and what types of pastel I used might give you an idea of can be accomplished with various types.
Winston is a 5¨ x 7¨ done on Pastelmat paper, pastel pencil, and soft pastel for the background.
The sunflower I´m working on is 20¨x30¨ on Canson Mi Tientes Touch paper, all soft pastel sticks.
Cornstalk Stacks is 5¨x7¨ on Pastelmat paper, Nupastel pastel sticks.
Bridge is 7¨x11¨ Canson Mi Tientes paper, soft pastel sticks, charcoal.
Snoopy is 8¨x8¨ MDF board w/colourfix primer, soft pastel sticks.
Lannie Lizard is 5¨x8¨ Premier Fine pastel paper, pastel pencil, soft pastel background.
I found the paper greatly affects the ability to create hard or soft edges. If you are using only pastel sticks, try snapping the stick to get a very fine sharp line. The hardness of the stick will also dictate how fine/sharp a line you will be able to attain. Of course the very fine grit papers will give a super sharp finish with pastel pencil or the Nupastel.
I think it a great idea to try as many different types of paper as you can to see what combination of paper and pastel works best for you. Sooo many options out there!  :o    :D
Not sure if you will find this helpful or not, but it sure is fun learning what you can do!   :painting:     :yippee:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


Maryna

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Reply #3 on: May 19, 2020, 07:28:28 AM
Thanks will check it out a bit.
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Aniz Oniro

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Reply #4 on: June 20, 2020, 07:59:20 PM
I did my first seascape in soft pastels,and i am not so happy with it .When i look at it from far looks ok but to look closer i can see the structure of paper,and this i dislake.For this one i used watercolor paper.
                 
  May be  is a special paper for pastels? or may be i did something wrong?
Please help me
Maria


Val

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Reply #5 on: June 22, 2020, 06:55:09 PM
There is no wrong when it comes to art.... just a few  :oops: and "whoopsies", to which I can attest I've made many!  :whistle:    ;D
I think you can see in my "Van Gogh" below, I had a similar result as you due to the paper I used. It was done on Canson Mi Teintes pastel paper. It looks fine from a distance, but closeup... and it looks like a case of the pox!I had forgotten that one side of the paper is honeycomb textured, while the backside is smoother. The only drawback being that it does not hold as many layers of pastel. Some watercolour papers have a smoother back, so you could possibly try working on that side.

I prefer the medium to light sanded papers as it is easier to get a smoother finish, which I prefer. It just takes a little getting used to as the sanded papers require a much lighter touch.
So nothing wrong on your end Maria, just keep the texture of the paper in mind.  I love the bright colours you chose.  :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


Aniz Oniro

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Reply #6 on: June 24, 2020, 11:59:37 AM
 :thankyou:so much Val for explaining
I am listning pastel lessons now so many of my questions starts to be clear, and i start  to understand the pastels. :flowers:
Maria


 

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