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Author Topic: Bright Winter  (Read 493 times)

stoney

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on: November 30, 2020, 06:35:36 PM
Oil Paints: M. Graham and Winsor Newton.

Titanium White, Indian Yellow, Yellow Ocher, Vermilion, Permanent Alizarin Crimson,
Burnt Sienna, Van Dyke Brown, Prussian Blue,  Pthalo Blue, and Lamp Black

11 x 14 inch stretched canvas.




There was no source photo.  I was working from my imagination.  Instead of working in thin layers, as is my usual, I was working with thick paint.  I wanted distance in the painting, and wanted to bring bright colors into a winter painting.  I wanted to see how much I could get done in one sitting.  That meant working fast.  I got a lot farther than I expected.

It's all new techniques to me.  So, I started out with a dry canvas.  That didn't work.  The paint wasn't coming along smoothly.  Tried a different color elsewhere in the sky and that didn't work the way I wanted it too, either.

So, I got a clean brush and put Walnut Oil on it and brushed it on the areas without
paint. Put Walnut Oil on the brushes with paint on them and went over the areas again.  Much better. 

Started out with the Indian Yellow and rough blended Vermillion over it then Pthalo Blue above that.

Scrubbed in a dark purplish layer below the yellow to suggest hills and you can, on the viewer's left side, see where the yellow sky color is.  The band isn't uniform.

After that used a vertical brush to suggest forest.  Put in the foreground using Titanium White and Ultramarine Blue.

Put the clouds in and 'feathered' them in in places.

Put in the trees and branches using Van Dyke Brown and a bit of Ultramarine Blue.  Put snow indications from blowing winds on the trees.  I suggested where the tree roots were and had to stop.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #1 on: November 30, 2020, 06:43:18 PM

Added hints of more clouds and put a tint of orange at the bottom of the sky and lighter elsewhere to suggest clouds.  Went over the back snowfield, working between the trees, to make it more dynamic and a varied terrain.

Added more variety to the foreground snow, too.

Added more branches, snow and height to the trees.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #2 on: November 30, 2020, 06:44:05 PM

The blue sky in the center ended up with a vertical scratch so I fixed that and put some faint clouds in to break things up.

Worked around the shadows in the right trees, adding texture.  Worked on the left tree shadow and mounding.  At the left tree's right root there was a straight snow line ridge.  It was an 'artifact' I didn't like.

Added more snow to the tree limbs and flying snow impacts on the trees elsewhere.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #3 on: November 30, 2020, 06:44:42 PM

Went back into the midground snowfield to make things more chaotic and did the same to the foreground.  Restated the blowing snow on the tree trunks to cover the paint edges.  I turned that left tree root 'artifact' into a small rise in the ground.  Tidying up took more time than I had put into it prior.

I'm aware that a person can spot something wrong in a painting, but may not be able to tell what was bothersome.  This happened with my instructor.  Fortunately, she figured it out.  She put a very thin amount of the sky color on the brush and brushed it over the lower parts of the trees.  There was no sky color visible between the tree trunks.

I thought the result was successful.  My working life, with the exception of my first job, was all technical.  It's a detriment in my painting as I'm so clinical on it.  I struggle with how much detail is enough.  It's that way with observing paintings in a book.  A top example of the struggle is seeing the paintings, and explanations in a book like; "Brushwork For the Oil Painter" by Emille A. Gruppe.

« Last Edit: November 30, 2020, 06:52:59 PM by stoney »
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


nolan

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Reply #4 on: November 30, 2020, 08:15:29 PM
Your painting is coming along nicely :clap: :clap: :clap:

What is bothering me are the bands of colour in the sky. The colours are usually a gradual shading unless it is clouds that are reflecting colour


stoney

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Reply #5 on: December 01, 2020, 07:31:37 PM
Your painting is coming along nicely :clap: :clap: :clap:

What is bothering me are the bands of colour in the sky. The colours are usually a gradual shading unless it is clouds that are reflecting colour

I thought the color vibrancy would carry it through.  I'll go back into it and rework the sky.  Thank you.  It'll be interesting to see what the changes do.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


nolan

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Reply #6 on: December 01, 2020, 09:02:57 PM
the vibrancy is fine it is just the three bands of colour that are bothering me. Clear sky shades perfectly smooth like this:

When there are clouds in the sky then you can get banding like that. So if you want to keep the banding effect just add a cloud effect into the area:



stoney

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Reply #7 on: September 07, 2021, 11:36:36 PM
It's been awhile, and I have no idea where the original thread is.  I didn't realize it was going to be this long before I got back to it; and I incorporated the suggestions.

Anyway, it went to the local county fair and got a first.  Right now it's at the county fair in Tulelake, California.  After that it will go to another Oregon town's 'Potato Festival'.

This one had no source photo and was right out of my head.  It was an experiment in working looser.


The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


Bill76434

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Reply #8 on: September 08, 2021, 12:05:08 AM
 :clap: :clap: :clap: great colours


stoney

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Reply #9 on: September 08, 2021, 12:23:03 AM
:clap: :clap: :clap: great colours

Thank you, kindly.  It was a fun one.  It wasn't unexpected the foreground would take a lot more time than the rest of it.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


nolan

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Reply #10 on: September 14, 2021, 08:25:31 AM
I have merged the final painting with the rest of the posts about it for you O0

It was great seeing the progress of this artwork :yippee: :yippee: :yippee:


njnjgirl

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Reply #11 on: September 14, 2021, 12:31:52 PM
Lovely to watch this emerge.  Very nice! :clap: :clap: :clap:
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


Aniz Oniro

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Reply #12 on: October 10, 2021, 10:57:57 AM
 :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Maria


 

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