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Author Topic: Tracing  (Read 198 times)

patindaytona

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on: December 09, 2020, 08:48:50 PM
Read it many times and places on the web about tracing and how it's not considering cheating.........but..........I still feel like i am! The proportions of a portrait for example are so dead on and I'm sure anyone who see's these things, are thinking all of that is pure talent. It would take me forever to get the proportions right if i did it freehand. Just would like to hear some input on this subject.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Bill76434

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Reply #1 on: December 09, 2020, 09:18:04 PM
I sometimes trace using the light box. The good thing is it gets you into the painting quickly. Mostly I use the grid and proportional dividers.


dennis

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Reply #2 on: December 10, 2020, 02:18:19 AM
Tracing is not cheating. Anybody is able to make a tracing, but NOT everybody is able fill in the spaces in the painting. Tracing is a simple act, but it takes a lot of training to make a masterpiece out of it.
I've seen many a student make a mess of a tracing.
I've had many years of freehand drawing, yet as a professional, when time is a factor to put money in the bank, I've had no guilt in tracing a subject. I use any method to get the job done  :2funny:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #3 on: December 10, 2020, 10:16:08 AM
Tracing is not cheating. Anybody is able to make a tracing, but NOT everybody is able fill in the spaces in the painting. Tracing is a simple act, but it takes a lot of training to make a masterpiece out of it.
I've seen many a student make a mess of a tracing.
I've had many years of freehand drawing, yet as a professional, when time is a factor to put money in the bank, I've had no guilt in tracing a subject. I use any method to get the job done  :2funny:
Dennis, how can they make a mess out of a tracing? I should not argue your point for sure! But, when someone see's the accuracy involved weather a portrait, or buildings etc. it is THAT which makes a major part of what appears as talent. I do understand your meaning about it's not just filling in between the lines. I feel so compelled to mention to anyone when they see my paintings that i trace first. I've always traced. Even my drawings I have traced first then did the shading etc. I feel like a fraud. I'll always struggle with this.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


njnjgirl

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Reply #4 on: December 10, 2020, 01:35:58 PM

[size=78%]Look at the paintings of the same subject in any of the lessons and you can see how they look different, yet were all traced.   Not everyone paints the same or gets the same result. I feel tracing is a tool, like using a template for circles or masking fluid to retain whites.[/size]
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: December 10, 2020, 03:06:14 PM
Good way of looking at it NJN. The tracing doesn't dictate the final result of the painting with maybe as much impact as i suspect.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #6 on: December 10, 2020, 09:54:30 PM
Tracing is no more cheating than using a brush to paint or taking a photo of a scene or using a computer screen to reference from. It is simply a tool in the artist's toolbox.
It is there to use if you want to. If you don't want to use it, don't. Either way, never feel guilty.

Just like you don't feel guilty using a brush instead of your fingers, don't feel guilty about using ANY tool you want to create your artworks.
Way back in the ages some muppet came up with the idea that x, y or z in art is cheating to either make himself appear more important or somebody less competent in order to get get ahead of a competitor and it stuck.
It is time to cast these crazy, imaginary roadblocks aside because it just stifles creativity.
Think about it, does a road marker feel guilty about using a template / mask to paint the road markings? Does a builder feel guilty about using a laser level to build straight? Does an architect feel guilty about using a CAD program to design a house? The list can go on, but the answer is always no. Nobody ever accuses them of cheating. So why should we feel guilty about using the tools of our trade?

It's as simply as that and don't let anybody tell you otherwise O0


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: December 10, 2020, 10:45:43 PM
Good analogies. Keeping this Nolan as something to read again if i have to. Thanks
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


zoorekan

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Reply #8 on: December 10, 2020, 11:13:13 PM
My 2 cents worth,,,, Depending on the subject I trace, use a Grid system, charcoal in or pencil in but my favoutite means of all if the painting is not complicated is just sketch it with a brush,,, normally a smallish flat or bristle filbert on a stained ground..

Tracing can be problematic as I found with the piece I am currently working on which is very detailed,,,, - psychedelic Mucha - inspired piece. I had to go with that blue copy transfer paper as here in Peru they've never heard of the Graphite stuff.. so the ink ended up running and in doing the under drawing and underpainting that caused a lot of issues having to re-imagine as opposed to re-image parts of it,,, it's a work in progress for sure but a learning experience in a country where not just a range of decent quality materials are available but at times nothing you look for can be got!That said their are some AMAZING artists here in Peru! I doubt very much they painted their works with Winton or VanGogh! lol

We do at least get a reaonable range of Rembrandt Colours and there is one Supplier who stocks Gamblin/Grumbacher/Golden and Williamsburg but alas they are now very limited stock and will not re stock until January.. either it's annual or 6 monthly. I must inquire aboute graphite transferr papers so thanks for rasing this topic
Now is the winter of our Discount Tent,,,, Just be sure to observe Social Distancing Measures if you plan to buy one or share one with others

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John


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: January 08, 2021, 05:40:20 PM
he began by making a drawing (either by hand or tracing it from a found image). He then went over the lines of this drawing with ink or watercolour. The final stage in his process was to press a clean sheet of paper onto the wet lines to make a ‘printed’ image. Andy Warhol
« Last Edit: January 08, 2021, 09:57:04 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #10 on: January 09, 2021, 03:16:25 PM

[size=78%]Look at the paintings of the same subject in any of the lessons and you can see how they look different, yet were all traced.   Not everyone paints the same or gets the same result. I feel tracing is a tool, like using a template for circles or masking fluid to retain whites.[/size]
I think that getting the proportions (shapes and perspectives) correct can be done freehand........in time, with anyone, but it would take alot of correcting along the way. Getting to the correct outlines is something that everyone can agree on. Their is no interpretation involved with that part of it (unless you purposely like to distort).
i would feel very uncomfortable if i were to just fill in between the lines and be done with it though. I believe the painting has to show some real work involved with it to overshadow the ease of which the outlining was done.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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