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Author Topic: Tracing method  (Read 1182 times)

ImBatman

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on: March 25, 2012, 10:28:21 PM
A  question for Dennis

I haven't done any of the Watercolours tutorials yet - sure I've watched them a bit, but not carried them out.

Is there any reason for using the carbon transfer method instead of the direct lightbox type method? :confused:

I put the template under my 300gsm Watercolour paper up against the wall of my large fishtank (an extremely effective lightbox by the way) and one could quite easily save a bunch of messing around by just doing it directly onto your painting surface. And if you pressed lightly enough, you'd be even less likely to gouge into the paper than rolling over the original with a biro.

Batman
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


dennis

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Reply #1 on: March 26, 2012, 12:31:17 AM
Sure, there are many different ways of transferring the image onto the watercolour paper. The only reason I use the carbon transfer method in the lessons is that many of the members like to paint along and I assume quite a lot watch them at night as well. Those that join early have an advantage of transferring their image during the daytime.

Another reason is that there are new members joining every so often and I need to show them how to transfer. I have a light box at home but not here in the broadcasting studio. Also it is not feasible for me to use the window during the lesson.

If one used the right pressure no grooving will present itself during the process if using a biro point like I do.

Normally it really does not matter what method is used for transferring the image. What really matters is that the lines must not be too dark to interfere with the final painting.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


ImBatman

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Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 01:48:27 AM
 :thankyou: Dennis I just wasn't sure if it was something specific to watercolours. Obviously I know about the other methods because I'm also doing your drawing course. ;)
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


dennis

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Reply #3 on: March 26, 2012, 02:19:54 AM
I forgot to mention that when transferring a design to watercolour paper NEVER to use the bought pencil or old typewriter type carbon paper as this will be extremely difficult to erase, if not impossible.

For watercolours I ALWAYS use either the light box method or the graphite pencil method as I show in my lessons. This way I know that I will not pick up problems.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill