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Author Topic: The Positive Side of Things  (Read 1790 times)

patindaytona

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on: December 24, 2010, 02:23:54 PM
Just some thoughts on painting. I tend to let my painting dry many time over a few weeks. The good thing is that unwittingly, by painting layer over layer and modifiying each succesive dry layer, I'm actually glazing, or scumbling and without being totally aware of that, it's adding more interest to the painting. It's kind of like overlapping object for more depth, but in a real 3-D space on the canvas.
I tend to sway alot from my first intentions when painting a photo. So, it's always loosely based. Some people do the entire painting in their head with no reference, so it's kind of like that to a less extent. If it does go off into another direction, i guess just go with the flow and don't restrain it. These are just some tips and perhaps some encouragement to others too if they find themselves going along the same paths.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #1 on: December 24, 2010, 08:33:18 PM
The modern trend is to paint in a way that all colors are blended into one another (as a single layer) at one sitting (alla prima). I tend to do that a lot. The old masters painted in layers, adding one layer over the other mostly without much blending. I'm not talking about glazing here - that is another technique altogether - but solid paint over the other. This is where the expression "Fat over lean" comes from. The under layers are always painted over  very thinly and allowed to dry. Each subsequent layer has a bit more oil and substance in it and the last layer is applied quite thickly. The secret is to allow all layers to dry completely BEFORE applying the next layer. If this is NOT done then cracking of the top layers will certainly come to light.

If done the other way round then the top thin layer will dry out before the lower layer has a chance to dry. As the lower layers dry out a change of volume occurs and stress crack begin to show in the top layer.                                                                   
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: December 25, 2010, 01:55:25 AM
That's one thing I'm worried about. I have no clue as to how much each application of paint contained medium to which amount. I just kept painting many many times. I hope if it does crack, it won't look too bad and maybe have some character to it instead. I've gotten so frustrated painting some for months because i wasnt' happy with it. I sure hope it'll be ok. I fall into dispair real easily. I have to take my paintings very seriously because I just couldn't keep doing it otherwise.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #3 on: December 25, 2010, 02:00:51 AM
If this is what it'll look like up close, it's not too bad. Mine isn't the Mona Lisa. I'm pretty sure mine WILL crack, don't know how long though before it does. I know for sure on one painting, I made thick impasto and painting lightly over that. As long as it doesn't look real bad or even worse, start to fall off the canvas.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #4 on: December 25, 2010, 02:02:22 AM
As you can see...
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: December 25, 2010, 12:04:56 PM
After all the paintings I've done, now i'm worried they'll all start cracking and look bad in a year, 5 years, 10? I can't do a painting unless it's many sittings because I get overwhelmed easily by it. Their's no way I can measure the amount of medium each time I paint because i have so much to be thinking besides that. I just dip my brush into the medium every time I add paint. Now I don't feel like painting because before i even start I have to be wondering about this.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #6 on: December 25, 2010, 06:22:52 PM
Pat, you don't have to worry too much. If have not put on a very thick layer and then added a very thin layer over it when the under layer is not dry yet then the chances are you will not have cracking problems.

Mix a drying medium such as Liquin, or similar, with your oil paints. The real problem comes when you paint impasto style and only use refined linseed oil as a thinning medium as linseed oil takes a very long time to dry out. Most colors dry out fairly fast except the whites.

Remember: you will have had to have done something very drastic if cracking appears, and then only after many years.

Carry on painting as normal and don't look for ghosts in the cupboard :heeha: :whistle:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: December 25, 2010, 07:40:20 PM
A few of my paintings are very thick. I would say impasto but not super impasto. I DID paint over it using thinned paint (as a glaze using alot of medium though). Of course, it would be the THINNED layer that would crack, and not the thick stuff. So...it would be very very tiny cracks. Hopefully, if anything does, it won't affect the "look" of my painting too much. Cracks wouldnt' be all that bad as long as the overall appearance still looks good. And as long as they aren't into something like the eyeball or something that would effect the appearance. One source I read said that most painting will crack within 6 to 12 months because that's the most critical drying time. I have a very thick painted one I did about 4 months ago and I didn't see any cracks. I DO drastic things to some of my earlier ones. I put on very heavy coats of Liquin as a final glaze to bring out the luster. It looks like cellophane wrap over the impasto. Also, put on at least 3 coats of the Touch up varnish because I kept saying I'm done....but wasn't. I'm hoping that all this about cracking is highly over rated.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #8 on: December 25, 2010, 07:43:04 PM
When you say dry, do you mean dry to the touch? It is pretty dry to the touch before i paint over it. I usually just dip my brush into the liquin and paint. Get out the painting many times and do the exact same thing. No measuring. BUT...it's dry to the touch. This has got to be the most perplexing thing about painting!
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #9 on: December 25, 2010, 08:48:55 PM
As you are using liquin already don't be over anxious. A normal painting layer will be dry to the touch in a day or two and over painting will not be a problem. The point is this: if you are painting thickly in the first layer you must let it dry very well before painting over it with a thin layer.

BEST: paint the under layer thinly - let dry and then paint the normal layer over it.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill