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Author Topic: Oil Painting QnA  (Read 18014 times)

marcanut

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Reply #15 on: July 01, 2012, 02:23:27 AM


Linda (linobe)

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Reply #16 on: July 01, 2012, 04:48:58 AM
I would like to see how to paint abstract backgrounds for things like floral paintings or portraits, etc.; how to make decisions on what colors to use and knowing when to underpaint in acrylics.


valweb

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Reply #17 on: July 01, 2012, 09:28:01 AM
I would like some more explanation on the following colours:  naples yellow and raw umber.   I was told not to use raw umber as it muddies the painting.   I have used it since you have introduced this colour and find it very useful.
Choose to make every day a good day


valweb

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Reply #18 on: July 01, 2012, 09:30:24 AM
Painting clouds especially the perspective.     
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valweb

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Reply #19 on: July 01, 2012, 09:32:06 AM
Highlighting a red rose so that it still looks red and not pink or yellow.
Choose to make every day a good day


Maryna

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Reply #20 on: July 01, 2012, 10:17:51 AM
How to see the colours within a colour. Meaning how do I know I need to use say ultramarine and cad yellow etc (sure you know what I am talking about)
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


claude

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Reply #21 on: July 01, 2012, 12:18:01 PM
I like blending with my fingers. Somebody told me it was dangerous. Is it and if so why?
If not now, when? If not me, who?


Tony (ASM)

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Reply #22 on: July 01, 2012, 05:39:26 PM
Q.1. I'd like hear a bit about 'Glazing' and what benefits it brings and why it's used.

Q.2. I'd like to learn about cleaning paintings. I ask this because, on close inspection of my recent painting 'The Eggsecution', I noticed a lot of fine dust/hairs or something had landed and stuck on it.

Q.3. Can light or dark be detrimental to a painting.

Q.4. When looking for a scene to paint, it's rare that it contains all the elements of a good painting and, a person can spend a very long time trying to find one (like fishing, the good one always gets away as you drive along a scenic route!). Is this where the 'Shadow Box' comes into its own? Create a micro scene where one can manipulate the elements, etc? Or, perhaps composite photo cut outs to create a scene.

« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 06:22:39 AM by Topdoginuk »
''Don't spend life going forward in reverse, just glimpse the rear view mirror now and again then, focus on what lays ahead''.
(Tony. ASM 3rd July 2013)


Vangie

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Reply #23 on: July 02, 2012, 01:48:53 AM
Hi RA.  What an interesting website!!! Thanks for sharing!!!

Hi Maryna.  I sure have the same problem as you... we'll get there with more practice, I hope.

Cheers
Vangie


Lillian

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Reply #24 on: July 02, 2012, 01:52:53 AM
Vangie!  So nice to see you here!  Are you through college/university for the season?  How's it going for you?
"The way to be happy," said Winston Churchill, "is to find something that requires the kind of perfection that's impossible to achieve and spend the rest of your life trying to achieve it."


Rkymtnmary

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Reply #25 on: July 02, 2012, 03:06:53 AM
My question is more of a philosophical nature and I hope I can get across what I'm asking. 

Prior to finding PB, I didn't even know that it was possible to paint unless you were a "real" artist.  But now, because I can do "x, y and z," I know that it IS possible to paint via the acquisition of  a skill set and various techniques.  I can now, whereas before this amazing education, I couldn't.

But what I yearn for is a feeling that I am a "real" artist and by that I mean one who views the physical world in a certain way with a natural ability to translate images, feelings and observations into a work of art.  To be able to take those skills and generate, without a prescribed pattern, a piece of art that originates from emotion, perhaps, mind, spirit..whatever it is that makes one comfortable in embracing the word artist and self together. To truly self-create I guess is what I'm saying.  How do you make that leap?

Nolan, if I made what I'm asking clear, would you mind sharing some of your own perspective on how you see and live your art apart from the education you provide to how we really come into our own skin as an artist?  I know practicing it certainly has to be a feature but how do you bridge what the eyes communicate to the hands and become part of the soul?

Ya, I know it probably sounds crazy...lol...but I'm comfortable being crazy!   :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:


Kelley

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Reply #26 on: July 02, 2012, 03:11:08 AM
Along Tony's lines of questions, is there a proper storage position (flat vs vertical) and location for oil paintings as they dry?
Kelley


Tony (ASM)

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Reply #27 on: July 02, 2012, 07:38:24 AM
I've got another question and, one that other people may relate to or, find interesting:

The thought of painting outdoors (assuming the weather is gonna be okay), can strike fear into new Artists when they may attract attention of onlookers. This requires a high degree of confidence, built on a foundation of knowledge, to be brave enough to do so. I do wonder what percentage of people actually do get out there and try this and, what advice would you and Dennis give on this subject?
I think people don't actually know when they are competent enough to accept they are an Artist, brave enough to perform to a small audience (maybe the sale of ones work and positive comments builds this confidence).
I suspect that people may fear other knowledgeable artists in the audience could throw difficult questions just to be cantankerous.
This is something I'm gonna have a go at next year. I'm gonna paint the Bob Ross style paintings because they can be done very quickly (half hour or so). I will let 'ya know how I get on. Oh, this leads me to the question, have you ever done outdoor live paintings to an audience Nolan or Dennis? (I don't mean teaching a class) and what kind of experience can share about it?
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 06:26:37 AM by Topdoginuk »
''Don't spend life going forward in reverse, just glimpse the rear view mirror now and again then, focus on what lays ahead''.
(Tony. ASM 3rd July 2013)


Maryna

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Reply #28 on: July 02, 2012, 08:28:53 AM
Just thought I mention, remember our questions must be based on classes that Nolan presented and what problems we still experience in some of those techniques.

 ;)
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Tony (ASM)

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Reply #29 on: July 02, 2012, 09:20:28 AM
Thanks Maryna! I didn't realise  :blush: Oh well, if Nolan runs out of questions, he might be able to use these as a back up.  :)
''Don't spend life going forward in reverse, just glimpse the rear view mirror now and again then, focus on what lays ahead''.
(Tony. ASM 3rd July 2013)