Paint Basket Art Forum

Author Topic: Oil Painting QnA  (Read 20230 times)

Val

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 21586
  • SMILE, It's a brand new day!
Reply #75 on: August 17, 2012, 02:02:14 PM
I have wondered about that myself. If you have a tall building, casting a shadow across a road to another building, a lawn or tree in a park...does the one shadow colour just merge into the others or is a totally different mix required? Glad I found this thread....Nolan, Dennis?
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


Val

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 21586
  • SMILE, It's a brand new day!
Reply #76 on: August 17, 2012, 02:04:03 PM
This sounds like it was a banner class! It's on the evergrowing list!!!

I'm starting to sound like a very spoiled toddler....'I want, I want, I want!'

Getting closer to the teen years.... 'But I really NEED this!'

Teen years....... 'But I'll just DIE if I don't get it!'

Wow...I'm really stuck in a time warp.   :D

 :2funny:   :2funny:   :2funny:
« Last Edit: August 17, 2012, 02:08:49 PM by Val »
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


Leana

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1382
  • By painting daily, you grow daily
Reply #77 on: August 17, 2012, 07:14:02 PM
As far as I remember...with cast shadows... should the one shadow fall on different subjects...then you need to use a different colour cast shadow for each of the components...eg I am busy with a painting of a cat standing in a doorway...the shadow of the cat is falling on the white wall as well as the wooden door frame... therefore the cast shadow colour i glaze on the door frame, will be different to the cast shadow on the white wall...but because it 'flows' as one shadow, even if the colours of the cast shadow is different, it does form a unity...
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


nolan

  • Administrator
  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 14221
    • Draw With Nolan
Reply #78 on: August 17, 2012, 10:18:03 PM
I did answer that one in the QnA class, you mix the shadow colour of the object that the shadow is being cast ON, so if a tree is casting a shadow on the red ball, then you mix the shadow colour of the red ball


Val

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 21586
  • SMILE, It's a brand new day!
Reply #79 on: August 17, 2012, 10:47:14 PM
Right....that's another lesson to add to the list.   :tongue:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


BJSouth

  • Pencil
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Reply #80 on: November 11, 2012, 12:35:59 AM
Have seen many how-to videos where painters are using turpentine to think oil paint to near liquid - I thought this should never be done as turps would break bonds in the oil paint.  What are your recommendations for thinning oil paint to very thin consistency?  Or, to thin to any consistency?
Thx! :confused:


polliwag

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1999
Reply #81 on: November 11, 2012, 03:01:52 AM
BJ, In the free oil and acrylics class, Nolan says he uses a product that they have but do not sell.  He recommends Liquin.  He says he knows it works.  Turps break down the oils and should not be used to thin paints.  I think it is Winsor  & Newton who makes the Liquin. Most of the major suppliers should have it.  I have just started viewing the oil and acrylics class, but I have not started using either of these mediums.  I do watercolor now, but am getting ready to try the oils.  Hope this helps.  I was just viewing this part of the lesson tonight.
Dianne

"If you change the way you look at things,
the things you look at change."
               Wayne Dyer


C.Bodine

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2882
Reply #82 on: November 11, 2012, 05:17:45 AM
 :welcome:  BJSouth! Using a product to thin your paints that you use to break down paints when you are cleaning your brushes just doesn't seem like a good idea, does it?  :-\   :)  I don't know why some artists do it! Dianne is correct.  You should never use turps to thin your paint. The liquin is one thing Nolan has suggested.  I think you can use linseed oil, as well. Actually there are several different options, I believe, but wait for the expert to come along and give you the best advice.  I'm sure you will hear from him soon.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2012, 05:21:09 AM by C.Bodine »
Christina


musika

  • Paint Brush
  • *
  • Posts: 757
  • Ray from UK
Reply #83 on: November 11, 2012, 11:38:51 AM
Turps, or other solvents (more accurately, diluents) such as mineral spirits or oil of spike lavender are more or less standard in oil painting. Nolan uses one! BUT, I believe, he recommends not using JUST turps.

Many artists will just use turps to thin for the very first layer (imprimatura) or for toning the canvas and gradually add more oil for each subsequent layer. Turps evaporates quickly (It's like using water to thin in watercolours) leaving the oil paint on the canvas.

It is possible to paint in oils and not use any diluents,  even clean-up can be done with vegetable oil, and soap and water.
Ray


valweb

  • Paint Brush
  • *
  • Posts: 788
Reply #84 on: November 11, 2012, 03:52:59 PM
Before Paint Basket days, I use to use tons of turps....and suffered from sinus.   Now I only use turps to wash my brushes inbetween different colours and when I am finished painting.   I use linseed oil and sometimes liquin.   I don't think turps is good to mix into  ones paint.  :whistle:
Choose to make every day a good day


valweb

  • Paint Brush
  • *
  • Posts: 788
Reply #85 on: November 11, 2012, 04:00:58 PM
I have a book by Helen van Wyk...Colour mixing.  This is what she says..

Q.  What colour do I see.   
A.   It has to be one of these six:  yellow, orange, red, violet, blue or green

Q.   What tone is it:
A. It is light, medium or dark in contrast to its surroundings.

Q.   What intensity is it:
A   It is bright, medium or dull

Q.  What hue is the colour:
A.   It is a warm version of the colour or it is a cool version of the colour.

or:

Use the colour buster that Nolan supplies.   It works well for me. 

It is also very good to do some colour wheels using different blue, red and yellows getting to know ones paint names and colours.

Hope this helps.  :flowers:
Choose to make every day a good day


Rkymtnmary

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1197
Reply #86 on: November 11, 2012, 07:00:27 PM
I use only linseed oil...I did try a Winsor Newton product called "Fast Drying Medium" and went right back to linseed oil...it was like painting with maple syrup it was that sticky...and looks like it too.  I spilled some, as I always do, and STILL can't get it off my table.   :2funny:


ImBatman

  • Easel
  • *
  • Posts: 1376
  • 5375
    • creative with colour
Reply #87 on: November 11, 2012, 07:20:56 PM
Thinning with turps? Was that noise the sound of Nolan's heart monitor flatlining???  :2funny:

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


BJSouth

  • Pencil
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Reply #88 on: November 11, 2012, 09:24:37 PM
Wow!  I'm impressed by all the great responses!  Sounds like Liquin or linseed oil wins the day.   
If you do use turps for that first thin layer, will that ultimately cause damage to the painting? :thankyou:


C.Bodine

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2882
Reply #89 on: November 11, 2012, 09:35:59 PM
The only time I have ever seen Nolan use turps on his painting is to remove something from the canvas.  Then he tries to wipe it off. He has taught us that it will eventually cause the paint to break down.  I know there are many artist who do use it.  What Nolan says just makes sense to me. He does, of course, use it for clean up. 
Christina


 

SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2021, SimplePortal