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Author Topic: Oil Painting QnA  (Read 20238 times)

ImBatman

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Reply #90 on: November 11, 2012, 11:55:50 PM
If I may offer a possible way to think of this issue:

Oil Paint is Oil-based, not Turps-based.

The turps is used as a solvent to cut through the oil in cases where removal is required - because water wouldn't work. If turps was a good inclusion in their paint products, I'm sure manufacturers would use it, because it would be much cheaper than the oils they use.

Make sense to anybody?

Batman.
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NOELINE

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Reply #91 on: November 12, 2012, 10:08:18 AM
  just asking?   I watched a U tube video about oil mediums and the overall  producers  shows that you can mix 1\3   linseed oil, 1\3 turps and 1\3 varnish  to make a good oil med.  But i wondered about the turps because i heard the same, turps is not good for the long levity of a painting.  please help me in this?


Maryna

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Reply #92 on: November 12, 2012, 01:09:49 PM
I use Linseed oil, I have never bought Liquin.

turps is for cleaning brushes, DO NOT thin you paint with turps, it will destroy the painting, you will only see the effects in about 10 years or so, then you can chuck the painting away.
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


polliwag

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Reply #93 on: November 12, 2012, 02:50:17 PM
I haven't started oils yet, but hope to real soon.  I don't think I will chance using the turps for thinning.  Better to be safe than sorry.  If you clean your brushes with turps, do you just dry the brush off with a towel as much as possible before dipping it into the paint again?  I know the class probably told me that, but my brain is overloaded with all these tips and techniques!  I think as soon as I can find time I will go through the videos again and make a list of such items for quick reference.
Dianne

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Rkymtnmary

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Reply #94 on: November 12, 2012, 03:52:43 PM
Diane - I don't know if it's right or wrong but I do it anyway only because it makes sense to me...it seems to me that after cleaning your brushes with it,  that there has to be residue on it whether you air dry or wipe dry -  minimal maybe but still there.  So after I clean them, I always follow up with soap and water and rinse really well.  Thus far, I haven't had any issues.  I actually did have a painting crack and it was not in 10 years but under 10 wks!  It was a landscape lesson Nolan had us painting a house in the foreground to learn perspective and not being happy with what I'd done, I "erased" the whole house with turps which also included the ground in front of the house as well.  Well, it cracked over the entire area and looked just awful.  And unbelievably, my sister loved the "effect" and helped herself to it!  That was the first and last time I ever "corrected" a painting with turps!


nolan

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Reply #95 on: November 17, 2012, 11:19:14 PM
turps is for cleaning your brushes and not for painting, that is what painting mediums are for O0


Kelley

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Reply #96 on: November 18, 2012, 05:50:29 AM
 O0 Agree 100% with Nolan.
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #97 on: November 18, 2012, 05:58:01 AM
I have been promising to post these photos for ages now so here they are. This is what a painting looks like when you use turps to thin your paints :



Kelley

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Reply #98 on: November 18, 2012, 06:01:58 AM
I've seen too many paintings in my area resulting in the same condition.  :(    My guess is whomever the their instructor was had no problem allowing students to use turps.  Shame really.
Kelley


Val

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Reply #99 on: November 18, 2012, 12:49:31 PM
What a heartbreak.  :( Lesson understood.  O0
Cheers, Val

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Leana

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Reply #100 on: November 19, 2012, 03:20:52 PM
Nolan, thank you for posting those photographs.  I have to admit, I have also heard and seen a lot of artists using combinations of Gum turps, stand oil/or linseed oil and Damar... Stand Oil is a very think syrup like medium and it needs to be 'thinned'...and apparently the only thing you can thin it with is Gum or Citrus Turps because it doesn't 'work' in anything else  :confused: ... So to be safe my question is> if you use Liquin... (keeping the fat over lean rule in mind)...can you add progressively linseed oil or Stand Oil to liquin to make it fatter  :confused: or is that a no-no.  I have even seen in a newish local art magazine (been out a year now) where they give or suggest recipes in how to make your own mediums.  What I have noticed is that whenever turps is used...it is mixed with Stand Oil (which I know is also linseed oil, but under went a different process) and not Linseed Oil... the Stand Oil is apparently much stronger and 'bendable' compared to normal linseed oil.

I also looked on a bottle of W&N Painting Medium I have here and noticed it is made up of Linseed stand oil and petroleum distillate (which is> produced from crude oil.  Solvents produced from this includes mineral spirits, white spirits etc.)

So besides Liquin and linseed oil...what would be the best thing to combine with Stand Oil then  :confused:

Leana

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Leana

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Reply #101 on: November 21, 2012, 06:48:49 AM
Nolan ... Dennis..... anybody  :confused: ... help regarding my previous post  :eyesclosed:
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


musika

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Reply #102 on: November 21, 2012, 10:31:24 AM
Fat and lean do not mean the same as thick and thin.
Fatter means adding more oil (a fat) even though the result will be a thinner mixture on the palette.
Ray


Leana

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Reply #103 on: November 21, 2012, 11:42:36 AM
Thank you for your reply Musica, however I do understand the difference between 'Fat and Lean' and 'Thick over Thin' principles... what I mean by 'thin'...is to make the Stand Oil 'userfriendly' because it is extremely thick as in syrup like.  So basically in general artists would mix Gum Turps with Stand Oil... my question is what can you mix with Stand Oil...because as far as I know you can't use it as is...you need to make it more liquidy (maybe this is a better word to use instead of 'thin')...if you know what I mean... if you refer to my previous post...
Nolan, thank you for posting those photographs.  I have to admit, I have also heard and seen a lot of artists using combinations of Gum turps, stand oil/or linseed oil and Damar... Stand Oil is a very think syrup like medium and it needs to be 'thinned'...and apparently the only thing you can thin it with is Gum or Citrus Turps because it doesn't 'work' in anything else  :confused: ... So to be safe my question is> if you use Liquin... (keeping the fat over lean rule in mind)...can you add progressively linseed oil or Stand Oil to liquin to make it fatter  :confused: or is that a no-no.  I have even seen in a newish local art magazine (been out a year now) where they give or suggest recipes in how to make your own mediums.  What I have noticed is that whenever turps is used...it is mixed with Stand Oil (which I know is also linseed oil, but under went a different process) and not Linseed Oil... the Stand Oil is apparently much stronger and 'bendable' compared to normal linseed oil.

I also looked on a bottle of W&N Painting Medium I have here and noticed it is made up of Linseed stand oil and petroleum distillate (which is> produced from crude oil.  Solvents produced from this includes mineral spirits, white spirits etc.)

So besides Liquin and linseed oil...what would be the best thing to combine with Stand Oil then  :confused:


Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


musika

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Reply #104 on: November 21, 2012, 12:09:13 PM
My reply was not to you, Leana but to Maryna's post, which has now disappeared.  :confused:

Ray


 

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