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Author Topic: Tones  (Read 1806 times)

patindaytona

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on: January 01, 2011, 12:45:28 AM
It says that some colors such as yellows have a more limited value range as is shown. But what about the Raw Sienna for example. That's supposed to be very dark yellow. Why does it show that yellow only gets this dark on the chart?
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #1 on: January 01, 2011, 10:02:33 PM
because each color has a maximum chroma (intensity) and value (lightness or darkness). I have included a panchromatic (greyscale) colour wheel on the Color Buster exactly for this reason.  The Munsell colour charts also take this into account :

Munsell Color Wheel System for color mixing


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: January 02, 2011, 03:11:47 AM
Ok, now I'm getting confused. On this chart is shows vertically the tonal values, correct?    If so, you're supposed to darken a color using the next color down on the color wheel.   If this is so,   that would tend to make say.. a blue towards purple ( a bluish-purple).    Ok, if that's so, why doesn't it look that way going down on the chart?
On the chart all the colors do not shift towards the next color down from them at all. They just get darker and darker. It appears as if tonal value here is refering to dulling down a color instead.       Is this correct?
Going left/right on the chart the colors DO shift using the "next color down on the color wheel".     So darkening a color refers to making it go towards a cooler color, and lowering it's value refers to greying it out?
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 08:10:07 PM by nolan »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #3 on: January 02, 2011, 04:03:30 PM
Ok, i can see the blue getting darker in tone as more purple is added. Good enough, i don't want to overcomplicated it. Another way of looking at the dulling down chroma is by saying, "replacing a COLOR with a percentage of grey. Still remains same value though.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #4 on: January 02, 2011, 08:05:09 PM
on the tone checker, the pure color is in the center and then you have more white added upwards and more black added downwards, ie., purely a tonal adjustment


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: January 02, 2011, 09:45:04 PM
Does that mean that a color coming straight out of the tube is not necessarily the highest chroma? Some colors, if you add white will have a still higher chroma?
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #6 on: January 02, 2011, 10:27:25 PM
it all depends on the color. The best place to see it is in the Munsell Color Charts. There you can see that different colours have their highest chroma at different tonal values. These highest points correspond with the panchromatic color wheel (also on your Color Buster)

Compare the Munsell color chart pdf and the panchromatic color wheel to see it the best