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Author Topic: Lower Chroma Distance  (Read 954 times)

patindaytona

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on: January 04, 2011, 07:51:33 PM
.....Started painting the tree in today. It is a bare tree with tons of branches. I had trouble before doing something like this because of the consistancy of the oil paint. It just didn't go down well. I couldn't find my rigger brush, so I used a very tiny flat. It worked pretty good actually and the paint lasted for the full continuation of the stroke. Only problem I have is that it takes such a delicate pressure to make the branches flow right. Sometimes the branch gets fatter instead of thin...really hard. I know i could use a support, which I should have. I always end up doing it the careless way and then correcting mistakes for a week. But it looks pretty good. Letting it dry for now. Also, I found that just the pressure alone makes the subtle tonal values in the branches, no need to create that later on. I know you're supposed to make distant thing duller.      But what about a glorious sunrise scene. In the photo, the foreground is in shadow. Should I still ahere to the rules by dulling down the color in the distance..orange, yellows..in the trees etc. AND then make the foreground richer more saturated colors like purple to intensify the background colors THAT way?
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #1 on: January 04, 2011, 10:05:16 PM
Should I still ahere to the rules by dulling down the color in the distance..orange, yellows..in the trees etc. AND then make the foreground richer more saturated colors like purple to intensify the background colors THAT way?

Difficult question to answer because each scene is different. Often I use my artists license to darken the foreground color so that the viewers eye is draw into the painting. That allows me to use more vibrant colors in the distance. Other times I dull down the distant colors so that I can show more detail in the foreground.