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Author Topic: Experiment in ageing  (Read 784 times)

Alan Dixon

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on: August 18, 2012, 09:30:05 PM
I have attempted to paint (acrylic) a winter scene and then try to do a wash to age the painting.
Here is my original painting
I then did several green washes to attempt the aging
I did manage to dull up the picture but I'm not at all happy that I have achieved any aging effect.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Alan


nolan

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Reply #1 on: August 18, 2012, 09:48:16 PM
when you do the aging effect, your initial colours must be solid and vibrant with lots of contrasts, that will allow you to use a darker green wash


Val

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Reply #2 on: August 18, 2012, 11:43:13 PM
Huh!  Another new thing learned, didn't know you could do that. Fascinating!
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


Karen

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Reply #3 on: August 23, 2012, 12:27:30 AM
That's an interesting thing to try to do. Did you want to make the building older or the whole painting Alan? Nolan put water runs and 'rusty' patches on the rainy day walls to make them look older.


Alan Dixon

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Reply #4 on: August 23, 2012, 02:07:30 AM
Actually, the intent of the experiment was to make the painting look like it had been done years ago. I certainly didn't achieve that, but I would still like to figure out how. Can't follow Nolan's suggestion with this one, but I might paint a colourful scene and try that.
Alan