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Author Topic: Using Fixiative on Canvas Sketch  (Read 291 times)

patindaytona

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on: December 28, 2012, 06:07:53 PM
How many of you fix your sketch before you start your painting? It won't hurt the overlying paint i hope (i.e. cracking). I've been doing it since day one. I don't want to chance anything without it because i really put alot of detail into the sketches.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Lillian

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Reply #1 on: December 29, 2012, 02:27:58 AM
Pat, I just finished a drawing course at our local college where we used several different mediums to draw on the canvas.  I used soft pastel for the first time, loved it.  As well, I used watercolor crayon and for more detail, I used watercolor pencil. 

I learned that the drawing can be fixed with a solution of 25% clear gesso to water.  White gesso can be used to erase any mistakes or unwanted areas and then the drawing materials can be used over that and then fixed with the solution.  I was able to dab the solution on the areas I didn't want to spread around and also could blend the drawing materials on the canvas if I wished.  Sometimes I made sure it was well fixed by applying more clear gesso solution.

The clear gesso solution gives good tooth and can be painted over with either oil or acrylic.

One classmate used water soluble oil pastels to do her drawing and did not fix it, not sure if it would need to be fixed or which paint would be suitable over it, oil, or acrylic???    Do you know?  Or can anyone else tell me?  I haven't done an internet search on this yet.
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patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: December 29, 2012, 02:54:03 AM
Great information Lillian, thank you. The watery gesso really sounds like it is a good solution being translucent. I will try it next time around. Im sure that is better than using the spray stuff.
I read about the pastel fixing. Some do, some don't (with spray). I think most don't. I won't anymore either. It chances the values (darks get slightly lighter, and lights slightly darker).
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.