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Author Topic: Using masking fuild on an oil painting  (Read 7770 times)

MSWcrane

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Reply #15 on: August 08, 2013, 11:36:38 PM
Nolan, when using Clear Cover do you cut it out like masking tape, after you apply, or do you trace onto it and cut out before applying?
Sue   ;-)

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stoney

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Reply #16 on: August 09, 2013, 01:20:31 AM
A technique question?  :confused:


Can I use masking fluid (Pebeo drawing gum) on a canvas under oil paint to keep a part of my drawing  :crazy2: ?


Josh :whistle:

You mean on a very temporary basis like being able to correct an area around the portion masked that's been painted?  Yes, I've done this using the same stuff used in water color.

If you're meaning over the actual drawing, no.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 01:26:03 AM by stoney »
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #17 on: August 09, 2013, 01:27:31 AM
You CAN NOT use masking fluid under oils. The only way to mask off with oils if you use clear cover or even masking tape.

Sure you can.  I've done it.  Simply use care in the removal of the masking fluid later.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


Germa

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Reply #18 on: August 09, 2013, 08:31:01 AM
Nolan, when using Clear Cover do you cut it out like masking tape, after you apply, or do you trace onto it and cut out before applying?

In the classes I have seen, Nolan cuts it out like masking tape.
Maybe it would be possible to trace/draw onto the paper on the back, a mirror image, and cut it out before applying, but I don't think that would be easier since that clear cover tends to be very curly.


dennis

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Reply #19 on: August 09, 2013, 09:32:10 PM
My personal opinion and experience:

Masking fluid was designed primarily for watercolours and NOT for oil painting.
Nolan and I, through the years, have had greater success with masking tape and transparent clear cover than with masking fluid.

If you are using canvas board (panels) then it does not matter if you cut slightly into the canvas,
If you are using stretched canvas on a frame then, to minimize the chance of cutting through I ALWAYS place a  book or a large flat object under the areas to be cut and then gently and carefully cut the tape and clear cover. Up to date I have never once cut through a stretched canvas.

Practice on an old scrap painting until you get the feel of it. In the end it is much better than masking fluid. The secret is to have a very sharp craft knife.

Another point: It is also very easy to miss some areas when removing masking fluid - and because oil and rubber do not go well together a chemical reaction will take place and destroy a part of the painting even months after completing the painting - a great problem if you have already sold the painting. That happened to me once many years ago.
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MSWcrane

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Reply #20 on: August 09, 2013, 11:18:57 PM
 :thankyou: Germa
Sue   ;-)

Whooping Cranes are an Endangered Species and are the tallest birds in North America.


stoney

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Reply #21 on: August 10, 2013, 05:50:45 PM
My personal opinion and experience:

Masking fluid was designed primarily for watercolours and NOT for oil painting.
Nolan and I, through the years, have had greater success with masking tape and transparent clear cover than with masking fluid.

If you are using canvas board (panels) then it does not matter if you cut slightly into the canvas,
If you are using stretched canvas on a frame then, to minimize the chance of cutting through I ALWAYS place a  book or a large flat object under the areas to be cut and then gently and carefully cut the tape and clear cover. Up to date I have never once cut through a stretched canvas.

Practice on an old scrap painting until you get the feel of it. In the end it is much better than masking fluid. The secret is to have a very sharp craft knife.

Another point: It is also very easy to miss some areas when removing masking fluid - and because oil and rubber do not go well together a chemical reaction will take place and destroy a part of the painting even months after completing the painting - a great problem if you have already sold the painting. That happened to me once many years ago.

You mean even after all the masking fluid had been removed?

This is the first I've heard of Clear Cover.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


dennis

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Reply #22 on: August 10, 2013, 07:33:22 PM
Quote
It is also very easy to miss some areas when removing masking fluid

Even in watercolours it is possible to miss out on removing masking fluid. With oils it is much easier to not see to remove masking fluid under the wet paint.

Clear Cover is just one of the trade names for the transparent rolls used for covering and protecting books. Can normally be bought at any stationary shop.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


jocearseno

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Reply #23 on: August 11, 2013, 04:46:08 AM
 :thankyou:  to all of you and Nolan for placing my subject at the right place.


With the clear cover and the kind of drawing I have to cover it would be an evil task. I just want to preserve my drawing on the canvas, make my background and then paint my details. Dennis, the Pebeo masking fluid is grey and with paint on it I can clearly see it and my drawing is made with dark color pencil and I left place for enlarging my subject a little if needed.


Yes Nolan the sea will not be a complete mirror


My test up to now, prove that you do not have to put a heavy film of masking fluid because thick patches may lift with a 2 inches bristle brush with the wet on wet technique because you have to spread your paint or mix it with wide brush stroke but not much pressure. If the masking fluid make small particles, you have to remove it and clean your brush at once and then resume.


I did my test and now I am working on my technique and also on finding the right colors before starting my 30 x 30 inches canvas painting.


 :thankyou:  again and it is fun to have that kind of debate.


Josh  :painting:
« Last Edit: August 11, 2013, 04:54:38 AM by jocearseno »


stoney

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Reply #24 on: August 11, 2013, 04:51:53 PM
Quote
It is also very easy to miss some areas when removing masking fluid

Even in watercolours it is possible to miss out on removing masking fluid. With oils it is much easier to not see to remove masking fluid under the wet paint.

Clear Cover is just one of the trade names for the transparent rolls used for covering and protecting books. Can normally be bought at any stationary shop.

I had let the oil paint touch dry before removing the masking fluid.

Thanks, Dennis.  I'm archiving your post here about clear cover.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


nolan

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Reply #25 on: August 12, 2013, 09:03:52 PM
There are two ways to use the clear cover:
1) draw your shape in reverse on the back, cut out and apply to the canvas
2) draw the scene on the canvas, cut out a rectangle of clear cover that will cover the shape you need to protect, apply to the canvas, carefully cut out the shape with a very sharp craft knife - being careful to only cut the clear cover and not through the canvas


liz

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Reply #26 on: August 13, 2013, 05:27:47 PM
Nolan, can you just use a fine point sharpie and draw on the front side of the clear cover?


Liz


nolan

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Reply #27 on: August 13, 2013, 08:29:46 PM
not sure if the sharpie ink will stick, try it and let us know