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Author Topic: Very frustrated  (Read 3087 times)

stoney

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Reply #15 on: September 22, 2013, 07:58:50 PM
Hi Brian,
i am exactly where u are!metal gave me hope ...but  did really badly in folds!i revisited Q and A that Nolan has done where he explains how to blend Tulip.was all excited..i thought ...okay now i get.....only to be disappointed... Paint lifts off wheni try to blend!! And Nolan does it so effortlessly!
So i will be watching this thread...hoping to get some expert advise!

Those proficient do make it seem effortless.  It stems from much practice.  You'll get there, too-in time.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


scouserl41

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Reply #16 on: September 22, 2013, 10:02:02 PM
I painted over it in oils!
I'll try the "Painting White" excercise in Acrylics.
I'll ask the people at my local art class on wednesday what they think.
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


SunRai

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Reply #17 on: September 22, 2013, 10:17:54 PM
A LOOONG time ago I painted in oils, then a few years ago tried acrylics.  The quick drying of acrylics gave me fits.  Now I am doing watercolors, and love them!  I think I've found my medium.  However, during my acrylic time I heard about an additive that lengthens the open time for acrylics?  Does anyone have experience using this?  It may be helpful for those in low humidity areas.  Here's a link to one kind - http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-G-261-425-SD
-Pat

"Creativity requires the courage to let go of certainties."  Erich Fromm


scouserl41

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Reply #18 on: September 23, 2013, 01:25:15 AM
Yes I've been using slow dry medium, still dries too quick for good blending (for me at least).
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


SunRai

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Reply #19 on: September 23, 2013, 02:35:10 AM
Beyond that I haven't a clue!!  :confused:    :gl:
-Pat

"Creativity requires the courage to let go of certainties."  Erich Fromm


Val

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Reply #20 on: September 23, 2013, 11:45:02 AM
More times than not, we have high to extremely high humidity in the Caribbean. Here in Guatemala it is humid+ most of the time. Still even my w/c dry too quickly to blend at times. I'll paint along with Dennis, do a couple of small bits, go back to the first bit and the paint and paper are already dry! Meanwhile, Dennis is merrily dropping in colours! Guess the heat outdoes the humidity!  :crazy2:

Patience seems to be the key.  :gl2:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


Germa

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Reply #21 on: September 23, 2013, 01:01:02 PM
It does, warm air can hold more water than cold air.
Our winters are much dryer than the summers, just because of that fact.


scouserl41

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Reply #22 on: September 23, 2013, 01:42:31 PM
High humidity should prevent the watercolors drying out.
Humid air contains more water than dry air so doesn't absorb water as easily. Dry air like we have here in Southern California (Which is desert) sucks up water instantaneously, which is why we have to remind visitoirs to drink a lot of water because it evaporates from the skin so quickly.
So high humidity doesn't explain why your paintings dry faster than Dennis's Val!
Does Dennis wet the paper before starting? (I know NOTHING about watercolors). Maybe the type of paper makes a difference?
I wonder if coating the canvas with slow dry medium before I start would help the acrylics stay wet?
Oh! An experiment coming on!
Brian
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 02:23:34 PM by scouserl41 »
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


Val

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Reply #23 on: September 23, 2013, 02:10:51 PM
That's what I thought Brian, it shouldn't dry as fast. I've used a number of different papers, same problem. Dehydration is a constant worry here as well, amazing how much water a body can lose!  :eek:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #24 on: September 23, 2013, 09:03:57 PM
Great job Brian :heeha: :clap: :clap: :clap:

The wood is great, love the texture :clap: :clap: :clap:
I feel that the shadows cast by the sweets are too light however which makes you loose height. What you need to do is darken them by adding the shadow colour. That breaks the brightness of the colour  O0

Silver - Where your painting is now gives the feeling of an impressionistic rendition of the scene, so nothing wrong with it at all.  O0 If you had a longer time to blend, this painting would have been very realistic.

Folds in fabric - again nothing wrong with the folds at all - this is going to look great once the pear has been added.

Acrylics - they do tend to dry quickly, that is why I always recommend the guys start with oil paints as you can take as long as needed to do the blending. What you can however do is once the acrylics are dry, go over them with a second coat. The second time around you don't have to worry about covering the canvas anymore and you will find that you automatically are then left with all your time to work on the blending O0


stoney

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Reply #25 on: September 23, 2013, 10:13:41 PM
Almost forgot.  There are folks who use acrylic paint until the last layer, or two, then shift to oils for the finish.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


scouserl41

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Reply #26 on: September 23, 2013, 10:25:29 PM
Thanks for the tips Nolan, I kind of fudged in the sweets because I was concentrating on the wood textures. You've reminded me before about the darker shadows and my portrait class teacher keeps telling me the same thing. Maybe I'll listen to one of you some day??!!
I see acrylic painitngs that are just as well blended as oils, so there must be a way I can get them to work the way I want them. MORE PRACTICE!
Cheers
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


liz

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Reply #27 on: September 24, 2013, 06:05:01 AM
Aloha, Brian- 


I used to do oils, then switched to water soluble oils which I like a lot because they work like regular oils.
But I bought a bunch of acrylic paints to work with my granddaughter Emily (check out her work on my gallery).
So my last 3 paintings were done with acrylic.  Here's my 2 cents about acrylics:
1) When you get the hang of them, they can be easy to work with and you can do layered paintings like with oil;
2)  The two biggest difference with acrylics is that the colors are a lot BRIGHTER when they dry, and they DRY FASTER.
To compensate for the fast drying, lightly brush water on the area you're working on, then paint.  I use a small spritzer and in between spray over the palette.  If you're using a wet palette, don't squeeze out much water out of your sponge, only that it's not dripping when you place it on your painting tray, then put your parchment paper over it.
I find that acrylics are nice to work with.  IF YOU WANT TO SLOW DOWN DRYING TIME FOR BLENDING, FIND A MEDIUM that will allow you to do so.  I use very little medium, but experiment and be patient with yourself.  Cheer up!  :flowers: ~Liz


scouserl41

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Reply #28 on: September 24, 2013, 01:29:04 PM
Thanks Liz,
I'll try wetting the surface first and see how that works,
It's great that you are getting your Grand Daughter involved, and she's got a good treacher!
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


scouserl41

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Reply #29 on: September 24, 2013, 07:45:19 PM
Told you I could do it in oils!
Still need to try the painting white objects in acrylics though, we'll see how that comes out.
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)