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Author Topic: Very frustrated  (Read 3101 times)

MaryAnne Long

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Reply #30 on: September 24, 2013, 07:52:18 PM
Lovely fabric folds, Brian. :clap:

I could use the leftover fabric to make a new skirt.

Hey, Brian, while looking for a cute emoticom, I found this one and thought of you.  :beer:

aloha

mea (seam-STRESS)
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


scouserl41

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Reply #31 on: September 24, 2013, 08:03:26 PM
Thanks Mea,
I could use a beer about now but I just started a diet!
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


Leana

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Reply #32 on: September 24, 2013, 08:55:12 PM
Hi Brian... to answer your question regarding acrylics.  I paint in acrylics and oils...when I use acrylics though, I always have a spray bottle handy with some water in...but the bottle mist give a fine mist spray.  So when I need to blend with acrylics, I always give it a light spray as I go along.  Another thing to try is instead of doing the entire piece of cloth in one go...do it a section at a time.  So mix your colours for the entire cloth, keep it in your stay wet palette, but then take say the first section of the cloth in the top left...paint that and blend etc...then move to the next section.


I find that by doing the above makes the blending part easier.  I have also made myself an acrylic painting/glazing medium by mixing 2 products. Both products are from Derivan Matisse and they are Polymer Gloss Varnish and Spreader Medium.  I mix it 1 part Polymer Gloss Varnish and 3 part Spreader Medium. 


When I have mixed my paints I will add some of this in with my paints...or another way is to pour some out on the palette and just add colour and the amount of colour desired.


The painting below was painted the above mentioned way.  I have to add that I painted this painting in layers which also helped.  Painting size is 40cm x 90cm.


« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 09:04:49 PM by Leana »
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


scouserl41

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Reply #33 on: September 24, 2013, 09:04:45 PM
Thanks Leana,
I use the spray bottle on the pallet but not on the painting, I'm off to try the white objects painting so I'll let you know if your tips help.
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


stoney

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Reply #34 on: September 25, 2013, 03:05:19 PM
A LOOONG time ago I painted in oils, then a few years ago tried acrylics.  The quick drying of acrylics gave me fits.  Now I am doing watercolors, and love them!  I think I've found my medium.  However, during my acrylic time I heard about an additive that lengthens the open time for acrylics?  Does anyone have experience using this?  It may be helpful for those in low humidity areas.  Here's a link to one kind - http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-G-261-425-SD


Slow-driers.  They do work, but the open time is still short. My view is one's better off at the start working in oils because of the extended open time.  Once you've a better idea of the mechanics of how to get what you're looking for then look at acrylics.  Until that time acrylics-especially in low humidity environments-are exercises in frustration.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #35 on: September 25, 2013, 03:27:38 PM
High humidity should prevent the watercolors drying out.
Humid air contains more water than dry air so doesn't absorb water as easily. Dry air like we have here in Southern California (Which is desert) sucks up water instantaneously, which is why we have to remind visitoirs to drink a lot of water because it evaporates from the skin so quickly.
So high humidity doesn't explain why your paintings dry faster than Dennis's Val!
Does Dennis wet the paper before starting? (I know NOTHING about watercolors). Maybe the type of paper makes a difference?
I wonder if coating the canvas with slow dry medium before I start would help the acrylics stay wet?
Oh! An experiment coming on!
Brian

The desert is a 'different breed of cat'.  I spent 3.5 years at George AFB, in Victorville, CA..  Fortunately, I worked in the avionics labs working on the electronic units themselves and on the Wild Weasel aircraft (F-4 G's) inside maintenance hangers from time to time.

On the flight line tarmac you can literally fry eggs in a frying pan.  Flightline people wore pilots gloves when working on aircraft in the sun to keep from burning their hands.

A good visual illustration of the differences between results in the desert versus Norfolk, Va..  Riding a motorcycle in Norfolk with a leather motorcycle jacket with the forearm zippers unzipped and the chest zipper open a little provided cooling air and the jacket would billow.

In the desert, the same jacket set up collapses around your arm like a baked potato.

The reason for the leather is if you do hit the pavement leather slides where denim grabs.  This can generate heat stroke.  So, you ride in shirt sleeves.  If you hit the pavement due to something you're in trouble, but at least you didn't have heat stroke which can be fatal from the increased probability of hitting the pavement.

Base personnel were encouraged to keep a gallon of water in their car at all time in case of a break down due to the high evaporation rate.

Applying slow dry over the whole canvas won't help you with blending or give an overall increase in open time.  You'll just use more slow dry to no benefit.

The best thing you can do is work a small area at a time.

I understand water color paper is wet before being taped to whatever surface and the paper drying stretches the paper.

I also understand the whole paper can be wet if you want to tint the whole thing and that a finite area can be wet so color fills and stays in a particular area.  It does not expand to a dry area.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #36 on: September 25, 2013, 03:32:11 PM
Lovely fabric folds, Brian. :clap:

I could use the leftover fabric to make a new skirt.

Hey, Brian, while looking for a cute emoticom, I found this one and thought of you.  :beer:

aloha

mea (seam-STRESS)

My wife used to make skirts from table cloth.  She'd cut it to shape then put in a zipper.  Done.

Ah, beer.  While in Scotland I liked Carlsberg Special Brew from Denmark, as well as McKewan's Export and Tennant's Lager.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


scouserl41

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Reply #37 on: September 25, 2013, 04:08:58 PM
Stoney,
Carlsberg Special! Oh that stuff caused a little disruption in my life!
Back in 1971 in Uk there was a brewery drivers strike and there was no draft beer available. Pretty soon all the bottled beer was in short supply too. My new wife (of 3 months) was working for a bank and they decided to have a small celebration for the boss's new promotion.
She didn't drink much just an occassional 1/2 pint of lager. At the party they asked what she wanted to drink and she naturally asked for lager but as there was no draft lager they gave her a bottle. After a while they asked if she wanted another. After the third one nobody noticed that she wasn't there anymore until it came time to leave and they found her passed out on the floor!
Her boss got her into a cab and asked where she lived. At the time we lived on Devonshire Road in Oxton. She told him she lived on Oxton Road in Devonshire! Now there was an Oxton Road but it was a shopping center and they spent an hour driving round trying to find where she lived.
Finally the cab driver figured out it might be Devonshire Road. I was waiting anxiously for her return and suddenly the door of our little flat opened and a guy came in holding up my extremely intoxicated wife. I got her sat down and went after him thinking he'd been trying to take advantage of her!! After hurried explainations he calmed me down enough for me to stop giving him some severe bruising. I took him to his home and explained to his wife that he'd been very gentlemanly and looked after my wife, which prevented HER from giving him some severe bruising.
Turned out the bottled lager they'd been giving her was Carlsberg Special which is about twice as strong as regular lager.
Happy Days!
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


nolan

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Reply #38 on: September 25, 2013, 08:26:33 PM
great job on the oil folds painting Brian, didn't you find that easier


scouserl41

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Reply #39 on: September 26, 2013, 02:00:14 AM
Thanks Nolan.
I knew I could do it in oils but I'm determined to learn how to do it in acrylics too.
I'm working on the White Objects lesson in Acrylics, seems that glazing might work better than blending? I'll try and finish it up tomorrow and post it.
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


SistaPainta

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Reply #40 on: September 26, 2013, 10:59:27 AM
I'm scared of trying out acrylics, hence I won't be any help at all.. But just want to say, wow, I love that metal bowl & reflections.. and your pear & drapes in oil.. But beer is what caught my fancy on this thread.. I love those dark, brewed ones.. Irish & English.. love their flavour and colour and texture.. as for lager, it's Budweiser for me above all  ;D - I like my wine too, found a Chilean cabernet the other day named Santa Rita  ;D - aside from its name, it tastes pretty good too  ;)


scouserl41

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Reply #41 on: September 26, 2013, 01:38:02 PM
I'm scared of trying out acrylics, .....But beer is what caught my fancy on this thread.. I love those dark, brewed ones.. Irish & English.. love their flavour and colour and texture.. as for lager, it's Budweiser for me above all  ;D
I'm not "Scared" of new media I'm always eager to learn new techniques and skills and acrylics are just one more, I'll keep plugging although I love oils in a way I never would have imagined a year ago when I started using them. They frustrated me terribly then but a lot of practice and  some good coaching (Thanks Nolan) and I am a confident, happy painter. Maybe it just needs a years practice in acrylics?
I'm a dark beer lover too! Not so much Guiness but some of our microbrews in the US. My current favorite is a mix of 2 beers. A vanilla porter and a Danish red. The bartender thought I was nuts when I first asked her to mix them but now it's catching on with everyone there.
Budweiser is good if you want to wash yor brushes without wasting too much water!
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


stoney

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Reply #42 on: September 26, 2013, 05:17:58 PM
Stoney,
Carlsberg Special! Oh that stuff caused a little disruption in my life!

Heheheheheheheh.  Occupational hazard.

Back in 1971 in Uk there was a brewery drivers strike and there was no draft beer available. Pretty soon all the bottled beer was in short supply too. My new wife (of 3 months) was working for a bank and they decided to have a small celebration for the boss's new promotion.
She didn't drink much just an occassional 1/2 pint of lager. At the party they asked what she wanted to drink and she naturally asked for lager but as there was no draft lager they gave her a bottle. After a while they asked if she wanted another. After the third one nobody noticed that she wasn't there anymore until it came time to leave and they found her passed out on the floor!

That can happen.

Her boss got her into a cab and asked where she lived. At the time we lived on Devonshire Road in Oxton. She told him she lived on Oxton Road in Devonshire! Now there was an Oxton Road but it was a shopping center and they spent an hour driving round trying to find where she lived.
Finally the cab driver figured out it might be Devonshire Road. I was waiting anxiously for her return and suddenly the door of our little flat opened and a guy came in holding up my extremely intoxicated wife. I got her sat down and went after him thinking he'd been trying to take advantage of her!! After hurried explainations he calmed me down enough for me to stop giving him some severe bruising. I took him to his home and explained to his wife that he'd been very gentlemanly and looked after my wife, which prevented HER from giving him some severe bruising.

I can visualize that.

Turned out the bottled lager they'd been giving her was Carlsberg Special which is about twice as strong as regular lager.
Happy Days!
Brian

The taller can's equal to a triple Scotch.  I wince at the thought of her hangover strength.

I still have the short shaft 25g weight set of darts I bought when I was stationed at the USN sub base in Scotland.  We had to go through Scots Customs each time we left or came back to the ships.

People on my ship were well known by the locals for being sick all the time. The Corpsmen didn't bother keeping records, they'd hear your voice and toss you a bottle of pills.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


stoney

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Reply #43 on: September 26, 2013, 05:30:57 PM
I'm scared of trying out acrylics, .....But beer is what caught my fancy on this thread.. I love those dark, brewed ones.. Irish & English.. love their flavour and colour and texture.. as for lager, it's Budweiser for me above all  ;D

I'm not "Scared" of new media I'm always eager to learn new techniques and skills and acrylics are just one more, I'll keep plugging although I love oils in a way I never would have imagined a year ago when I started using them. They frustrated me terribly then but a lot of practice and  some good coaching (Thanks Nolan) and I am a confident, happy painter. Maybe it just needs a years practice in acrylics? 

Oils are fantastic for the beginner painter as they give you time to think about what/how to get the result you're looking for.  Many of the steps/techniques apply in the acrylic medium, too. A beginning painter, generally and metaphorically is trying to figure out 'which way is up'.

I'm a dark beer lover too! Not so much Guiness but some of our microbrews in the US. My current favorite is a mix of 2 beers. A vanilla porter and a Danish red. The bartender thought I was nuts when I first asked her to mix them but now it's catching on with everyone there.
Budweiser is good if you want to wash yor brushes without wasting too much water!
Brian

You are an optimist there Brian.

While working in Detroit there'd be a bar I'd sometimes frequent after work for a beer.  They served this stuff c-o-l-d.  One day I ordered my Louenbrou (sp) and took a sip.  I darn near spat it out.  Absolute Rubbish!

Puzzled I looked at the label.  It looked ok so I looked closer.  On the bottom of the label was; "Brewed under license by the Miller Brewing Company".  I've never drank one since that time decades ago.
The time it (a work) takes is the time it takes.


liz

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Reply #44 on: September 26, 2013, 06:59:50 PM
Hey Brian, you will do your best painting in oils or acrylic with a bottle of Chinese beer, like the one I had at a cousin's party in Shanghai.  It comes in the size of a bottle of Scotch.  Don't know the name. Ask for the best party beer then go paint and a happy painter will do his best art!  CHEERS, GUYS!
-Liz