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Author Topic: Drawing Course progress - Teddy Bear and Lama  (Read 669 times)

ImBatman

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on: January 05, 2012, 09:09:17 AM
Hi everyone

Well the next major drawing stage has arrived and here are my efforts with the Cross-hatching.

The teddy bear is one that someone at work got at Xmas time, so I took a photo and drew it. And the Lama is from the course materials.

These two are the first 'proper' drawings I have ever done - no tracing involved, all freehand.

I reckon they turned out okay, let me know what you think.

Thanks.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


Maryna

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Reply #1 on: January 05, 2012, 10:46:25 AM
nice going  :)

I am also  doing the course, however just got the manual,    (will get the videos once I have more funds :blush:)
Only at the berries now, going very slowly. Always though I could draw very well, but really didn't know all the techniques. Will post pics once done  ;)
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Tony (ASM)

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Reply #2 on: January 05, 2012, 10:50:03 AM
 :welcome: to Paint Basket (PB) Imbatman!
It's great to see postings by people taking the drawing course. Your pictures look great for a first time free hand. I'm intrigued to see what Nolan or Dennis say about them 'cos I haven't taken the drawing course, yet.
Well done and, please keep us posted with your progress.  :clap:
''Don't spend life going forward in reverse, just glimpse the rear view mirror now and again then, focus on what lays ahead''.
(Tony. ASM 3rd July 2013)


dennis

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Reply #3 on: January 05, 2012, 07:19:37 PM
Hi Imbatman. You've done an excellent job as far as freehand drawing is concerned. It tells me that you have a very good eye-hand co-ordination. The lama is actually from a photograph I took on the side of the road at a farm not far from me.

My advice is to not try and draw too fast (I can see that by the way the strokes are made) My favourite saying is this: "Go slow now for speed later!" Your tonal ranges (lights and darks) in the drawings are correct.

By taking your time now and studying each set of strokes on why they are at a certain directions, etc, and then carefully replicating them in your drawing, you will become a much better draftsman. I can clearly see you have great potential. Don't spoil it by trying to draw too fast. Remember: the tortoise eventually won the race against the hare!

Great job. Keep it up and looking forward to seeing more work from you  :clap: :clap: :clap:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


ImBatman

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Reply #4 on: January 05, 2012, 10:07:18 PM
Thanks everyone.

Dennis,  :thankyou: for the valuable input. It's the story of my life - SLOW DOWN. School teachers said it, cricket and golf instructors have said it, work colleagues say it. I just seem to have two speeds - on and off.

So I'm gonna have to force myself to remember to slow down when I draw - maybe I'll draw up a little sign to leave near my drawing area.

Also I will have to change the way I use the course materials. I have been trying not to copy the drawings as done in he notes - I've been watching the DVDs, reading the notes and then trying to do the drawing with no real guide from the hand drawn ones in there. Kind of proving I can do it without copying. Thanks to your advice I'll change the way I use the course a bit.

And try to slow down!  ;D

Thanks again
Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


dennis

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Reply #5 on: January 06, 2012, 12:00:52 AM
Absolutely nothing wrong with freehand drawing. Do the course by COPYING the lessons un til you are familiar and proficient then go over to freehand to reinforce the teaching. The ONLY way to start learning is to copy the work of people you admire. That's how the great Masters learned to paint.

When you are fairly proficient and confident with the techniques learned then start to draw other subjects as well.
 (I have sketchbooks full of small sketches of hat, pencils, cups, etc, that I did many years ago.)
 
Keep up the good work.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill