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Author Topic: Pat's WaterFall  (Read 5145 times)

patindaytona

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Reply #30 on: September 26, 2011, 08:52:33 PM
Nolan, you know how I always try to save everything till it's totally done. I do that with my wife too..if she comes upstairs, I do NOT want her seeing it because I might screw it up still....and won't show it till finished. I don't want praise only to find out I get severely :whistle: dissapointed after that.
I guess I can post it as what I've done on it so far just today...give me an hour..
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #31 on: September 26, 2011, 09:10:25 PM
Here's an idea. Try moving the falls closer to the foreground while eliminating most of the present foreground by adding more water. That should help your focal point issue.
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


patindaytona

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Reply #32 on: September 26, 2011, 09:39:42 PM
Ok...so far.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #33 on: September 26, 2011, 09:54:26 PM
 :D That's lookin' pretty good, Pat. I'm impressed, for what it's worth.  :)
You've captured that green water excellently.  O0
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


Val

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Reply #34 on: September 26, 2011, 09:56:57 PM
Pat, you just mystify me how you can paint something that looks so good, so quickly. One day I will paint pictures like this.  :clap:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #35 on: September 26, 2011, 10:03:02 PM
thegrinde..in the other topic of waterfall, you can see I've already started it. Should be ok, by the time i'm done.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #36 on: September 26, 2011, 10:05:12 PM
Thanks Thegrinde and Val. The painting itself looks better..it's kind of off and also dark here. I'll take more time on it when it's completed. I'm already fussed with it here and there, but I need to know when to stop not so much by how it looks, but also by how much time I keep spending on same things.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #37 on: September 27, 2011, 12:18:38 AM
the water is really looking great Pat, it got that nice luminosity to it O0


patindaytona

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Reply #38 on: September 27, 2011, 12:21:05 AM
Thanks Nolan...i know what you mean. I can see that too. I probably wouldn't have know what to look for 8 months ago....it IS dark here and looks much better in the painting. Besides that, when I paint in the rest..it's pretty dark, so that will make that water really look richer in color and lighter too.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #39 on: September 27, 2011, 12:36:17 AM
The water and rocks look like they're coming along pretty good!  It's interesting how different people have painting styles.  I usually get rid of all the white on the canvas by painting in background colors; I know someone who starts right smack in the middle and works outward, and some like me work around every part of the painting, refining each part until final details, harmonizing colors as I go along, etc.  O0  I wonder what Nolan and Dennis have to say about painting
styles?


patindaytona

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Reply #40 on: September 27, 2011, 12:40:10 AM
Liz, I just kind of went by what I saw in this particular painting..I knew the pond part had to be first since the surrounding leaves would over lap it. Then next is the little waterfall because the final background leaves again will overlap all around it's edges. On another painting, I might start completely with the background (like the sky, mountains, water we did on the video). As for me, I don't have any formula as far as that goes, just kind of think ahead like this and NOT too much thinking, just dive in.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Kelley

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Reply #41 on: September 27, 2011, 04:04:59 AM
Pat, did you achieve the luminescence by putting a lighter undercoat or thinning the paint... or both?
Kelley


patindaytona

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Reply #42 on: September 27, 2011, 02:48:47 PM
Kelley, I just painted the correct color I saw for the water over a white canvas. Wasn't too fixated on trying to get it thin or anything. I also "discovered" or mayby just remembered out of the past that when I added a little more yellow to the shoreline areas, because it's shallow there, and will tend to have a different color (not as dark blue)
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #43 on: September 27, 2011, 03:00:57 PM
Did a little more today, fiddled alot pretty much going nowhere with that. Have the whole canvas covered now. It's scarey not really sure about what I'm doing. Way too much detail to look at the photo, but I got the idea anyway.
Very generalizing or it would take forever. I always paint till my room is a mess (about an hour). Things progressively spiral that way from the start and it's good to just stop when it gets that bad..not so much out of frustration, but just a good time to quit for the day. Like Dennis said, a mess contributes to frustration.
It's far from having that clean look like Nolan does on the sunset etc. But every artist has his own way and many will do quite "spontaneous" looking paintings. I mix into all the different piles of paint I've premixed (browns, greens mostly), and it doesn't matter because you want that variation..no sense in cleaning a brush for this type of painting. I have seen many artist work just that way. I'll honestly say it's an uncomfortable feeling though to just try this and try that, but something's got to become of it eventually. It like the clean accuracy that Nolan does too...so both methods are good.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #44 on: September 27, 2011, 03:33:43 PM
In Viequez, Spanish Virgin Islands (PR), they have a couple of luminescent bays. At night the anchorage actually glows, looks somewhat similar to the water you have painted, with tiny points of greenish light. A bit eerie at times but beautiful. That's what your picture reminds me of thus far.  :clap:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet