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Author Topic: Pat's WaterFall  (Read 5148 times)

patindaytona

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on: September 11, 2011, 11:09:58 PM
Kind of thinking of doing this one. The more I do, the more I realize it's not going to end up looking anything like the photo. Is this a good choice for a painting? Would you change anything in it? I have not done many foliage paintings...a couple. Just not sure about which of my brushes to use. Big, medium?? If I start in the background, should I also use that same brush for ALL the foliage right up to the foreground (having a uniform texture/detail)?
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 09:06:17 PM by nolan »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #1 on: September 11, 2011, 11:24:37 PM
Beautiful subject! Unfortunately the water foam has been enhanced and is not real looking.
I've seen many photos that are being done this way with the water, lately.
Photographers and their filters can do wonders today.

Question I have, if this was painted, should the center be off set to the right or left a little more?
I'm thinking of our 9 square grid or 4 point perspective 'rule'.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2011, 11:26:44 PM by thegrindre »
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liz

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Reply #2 on: September 12, 2011, 12:08:30 AM
Hi Pat, good to see you doing a nature scene for a change!  It's a nice picture as is, but if a change was needed I would maybe move the waterfall slightly left since the water above is coming from the right side.  Painting rocks under the water's surface may be a challenge though.  I may forget about rocks and put some foliage in the foreground to do less water.  And I would make some splashes/sprays of water where the falls come down than the hazy stuff.  Thanks for asking!

BTW my last picture was an original flower painting.  Now I want to do a lush rain forest type scene, with a stream or waterfall. . . :gl2: :painting:


patindaytona

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Reply #3 on: September 12, 2011, 12:26:12 AM
Not sure yet if I'll do this, if I do maybe in a few days. Can you post your flower painting Liz? I'm just worried about clumping all the foliage till it looks like one huge mass. I can shift the pool somewhat I suppose. Thegrindre...yes, I used a tripod for this shot so the water feathered. Their's not alot of falling water, so I can improvise. Hardest part is starting it.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #4 on: September 12, 2011, 12:52:14 AM
Oh my, Pat, I didn't know you took the shot. It's still beautiful. I love it!

Question I have to all photographers is, if you paint also and plan to paint it, why don't you take the shot or pictures with the center of interest off to the right or left as we're taught to paint it??? Doing this would seem logical for those of us that like to paint from photos.
Would taking a shot off to the side destroy the rules of photography?

Just curious is all. (I know nothing about photography.)

Thanks,
« Last Edit: September 12, 2011, 12:54:01 AM by thegrindre »
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liz

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Reply #5 on: September 13, 2011, 05:39:25 AM
Hi Pat,  I put the flower picture with 'First Paintings' and I was only kidding about using your waterfall photo!  I hope you get started on it! :gl2:


patindaytona

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Reply #6 on: September 14, 2011, 01:50:30 PM
Liz, I'm still not sure where to find your painting at. "First Paintings"? I don't meander much in this site other than here in the forum.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: September 14, 2011, 05:19:39 PM
I'm going to put this one on hold. I had too much frustration fixing, adjusting, on and on with the last sunset paintings. Time off till the big one (flowers tutorial). I might attempt two of them also...maybe.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #8 on: September 14, 2011, 05:34:54 PM
Be patient with yourself, Pat.  The mood, impression is more important that going for perfection! :gl: :painting:

Anyway, the flower painting is under "First Seascape Painting and other firsts"
something like that. :flowers: :)


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: September 15, 2011, 04:00:31 PM
I don't know Liz. I looked, but I give up. Don't know where to go to find that link to your painting.
I like you thoughts on painting. I keep dwelling on all the paintings I ruined because I didn't leave it after 10 hours, but instead progressively made it worse till I gave up after 30 hours and several. Somehow I have to leave that behind me and I still think it's ok to do the fiddling to an extent, but it's like playing with fire. You really end up not wanting to leave it alone once you've made it worse and the more time you've spent, it's almost impossible.
I am a little better at keeping a close eye on not letting things get bigger (expand beyond the bounderies of the original outline). And overall, I don't spend 20 hours...now it's just 4-5 retouching.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #10 on: September 15, 2011, 07:27:34 PM
You are gradually getting rid of the fiddling Pat, we are very proud of your progress so far, keep it up, you are on the right track  :yippee: :beer:

HERE is the flower painting done by Liz that you were looking for O0


Val

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Reply #11 on: September 16, 2011, 12:27:08 AM
You've come a long way Pat. Believe it or not, you are actually calmer than when I first joined here. Plus...your painting is improving leaps and bounds.  :clap:
Give yourself some credit here and a clap on the back!  :clap: (its all I could find)  :congrats:
Cheers, Val

�Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!�

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: September 16, 2011, 03:52:58 PM
Thank you Val. Sometimes I actually take in those encouraging comments like yours if you know what I mean :whistle: Really though, I could not do it without them. You know today's world...so much anxiety and everything. It's really hard to sit STILL and paint with all of that going on in one's mind. If you have the desire, you can do it one step at a time. It's not easy though. Trying to be real, not complaining. Here's my fish I caught this morning. I haven't been fishing in while. It's a "redfish". They are good to eat. No going to paint him, just eat him.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #13 on: September 16, 2011, 06:24:06 PM
So Pat, fishing is the next best thing to do after art!  :clap: I love to fish with a hand line from a boat or small bamboo pole from a pier.  That is one prize fish you caught!  :yippee:  ::) You're probably preparing it right now, and I would enjoy your cooking since I can't both clean and eat the same fish I caught!  ::)


patindaytona

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Reply #14 on: September 16, 2011, 06:26:57 PM
Thanks Liz. Thing is....everyone can fish. Not everyone can be an artist. Yes, probably eat it tonight, not sure, maybe tomorrow. What water do you fish Liz? I'm on the atlantic coast of Florida. I fish from the shore though..no boat.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.